•   
  •   
  •   

World With a Greek law change, thousands of refugees could face homelessness

00:40  01 july  2020
00:40  01 july  2020 Source:   pri.org

Migrants. The NGO Oxfam denounces “mistreatment” and “exploitation” in Greece

 Migrants. The NGO Oxfam denounces “mistreatment” and “exploitation” in Greece © AFP / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI More than 33,000 asylum seekers live in squalid camps on five islands in the Aegean Sea, with a reception capacity for only 5,400 people. The NGO Oxfam denounces the new asylum law recently passed in Greece, which, according to the NGO, leads to "mistreatment" and "exploitation of people".

Refugees with precarious incomes also face reluctance from Greek landlords when they seek to rent lodgings on their own. "We have a disabled father and sister. How could the Greek government be throwing us out into the street? This is cruelty," says the family's eldest son Mustafa.

Refugees with precarious incomes also face reluctance from Greek landlords when they seek to rent lodgings on their own. "UNHCR is seriously concerned about thousands of recognised refugees expected to leave Greece 's reception system from the end of May," Boris Cheshirkov

When Bouri al-Kaidi and her four young kids got on a boat in Turkey to make the treacherous journey to Greece a few years ago, they had virtually no other choice.

a person sitting on a bed: Syrian refugee Lama Alnasef holds her 6-month-old son Abdalrahman as her other son Omar looks on in their apartment in Athens, Greece, June 18, 2020. © Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters

Syrian refugee Lama Alnasef holds her 6-month-old son Abdalrahman as her other son Omar looks on in their apartment in Athens, Greece, June 18, 2020.

They’re Yazidis — a religious and ethnic minority — from Sinjar in northern Iraq. In 2014, ISIS launched what the United Nations has now recognized as a genocide against Yazidis — murdering, kidnapping and raping thousands.

Kaidi says her own husband was kidnapped by ISIS. To this day, she still doesn’t know if he’s dead or alive.

Greece starts clearing ground for Athens property plan after long delay

  Greece starts clearing ground for Athens property plan after long delay Greece starts clearing ground for Athens property plan after long delayATHENS (Reuters) - Greece started work clearing ground on Friday for a real estate project that plans to turn a disused airport on the Athens coast into one of Europe's biggest tourist resorts, three times the size of Monaco.

Refugees with precarious incomes also face reluctance from Greek landlords when they seek to rent lodgings on their own. "We have a disabled father and sister. How could the Greek government be throwing us out into the street? This is cruelty," says the family's eldest son Mustafa.

The Greek Parliament was expected to adopt a bill later Thursday aimed at easing crowding in the camps. But that plan could simply substitute one set of problems The Court of Justice nearly always accepts the recommendations of those lawyers , but it is not clear how such a ruling could be enforced.

Related: Life goes on in Greek refugee camp amid diplomatic tensions and pandemic

Kaidi and her four now children live in a small apartment 10 minutes outside of Thessaloniki, the second-largest city in Greece. As they went through the asylum process, they were able to get housing and a monthly stipend of 400 euros — that’s about $450 — through the Emergency Support to Integration and Accommodation (ESTIA) program, which is funded by the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund of the European Union.

Kaidi qualified for the program because she’s a single mom, and because of mental health issues she’s developed since her husband’s disappearance, she said. But recently, the payments stopped coming. And Kaidi was told she’d have 30 days, until July 1, to leave her apartment. Thousands of others face the same deadline because of a new law adopted by the Greek government earlier this year.

New reports on surveillance, 'demographic genocide' of Uighurs

  New reports on surveillance, 'demographic genocide' of Uighurs New reports on China's policies toward Uighurs show draconian efforts to cut birthrates and surveil the largely Turkic-speaking and Muslim population. Israel hesitates with moving forward on annexing part of the West Bank. In Russia, a week-long vote comes to a close. A Eurovision spoof film is inspiring covers from real musicians.A child looks out from a door as a Uighur woman walks by in a residential area in Turpan, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, Oct. 31, 2013.

Palestine refugees and their descendants can register with UNRWA to receive services in UNRWA’s mandated areas of operation. UNRWA has not changed and cannot change its mandate. Under international law and the principle of family unity, the children of refugees and their descendants are

Greece has passed a controversial asylum law aimed at curbing the rising number of migrants arriving on “Urgent measures are needed to address the desperate conditions in which thousands of human beings insisted its aim was to accelerate procedures so refugees could be integrated more smoothly into Greek society and returns of migrants whose Faced with a backlog of 68,000 asylum requests

Under the law, adopted in March 2020, recognized refugees have 30 days to leave organized accommodations like ESTIA, and transition to living independently. Previously, the grace period was six months. The Greek government says it wants to make room for asylum-seekers waiting out their applications in camps on the Greek islands and elsewhere. Currently, more than 31,000 migrants and asylum-seekers are in overcrowded camps, living in unsanitary conditions as they wait for their asylum applications to be processed.

In a TV interview earlier in June, Greece’s Migration and Asylum Minister Notis Mitarachi said the government doesn’t have the capacity to give housing, a stipend, and other services both to people applying for asylum and to those who have already secured it.

Related: Refugees in Greece support each other through coronavirus pandemic

He suggested that the program is being abused by people who no longer qualify for it, and said that there are many in the program who secured asylum in 2018 and 2019 but are still receiving the benefits. Kaidi got asylum in 2018, but wasn’t aware of any rules that she had to leave after six months, she said. So, she decided to stay.

Greece extends curfew in refugee camps despite criticism

 Greece extends curfew in refugee camps despite criticism © ARIS MESSINIS Despite criticism, the Greek authorities have again extended curfew in refugee camps in the country. The restrictions imposed on March 21 will continue to apply until July 19, the Ministry of Migration announced. Despite criticism, the Greek authorities have renewed the curfew in the refugee camps in the country. The restrictions imposed on March 21 will continue to apply until July 19, according to the Ministry of Migration in Athens on Saturday.

Tenants aged 18 to 21 face exclusion from private rental market if stripped of benefit entitlement, says landlords association.

Europe's refugees face a growing crisis -- they cannot escape poor living conditions in Italy because European law doesn't allow them to leave their first

“It’s true that the people in the camps need to taken from the mud, the makeshift tents, the trash, the unsanitary conditions, and be put in a safe housing environment.”

Zoe Kokalou, Association for the Social Support of Youth (ARSIS)

“It’s true that the people in the camps need to taken from the mud, the makeshift tents, the trash, the unsanitary conditions, and be put in a safe housing environment,” said Zoe Kokalou with the Association for the Social Support of Youth (ARSIS), a nongovernmental organization that works with asylum-seekers in the ESTIA program.

“But it’s not right to take out the already-vulnerable so that we can bring the people from the islands. It needs to work another way.”

Nongovernmental organizations that coordinate ESTIA placements say the program was always meant to bring temporary relief to asylum-seekers.

“The goal of the ESTIA is to empower people to move on, on their own,” said Lefteris Papagiannakis of SolidarityNow, another NGO involved with the ESTIA program.

“But when you lack the next step, then you just put them on their own out on the street.”

"We suffered so much on this boat": high-risk trip for Rohingyas

 © Provided by Le Point "We suffered so much on this boat!": After several months at sea, a group of Rohingya refugees arrived on the Indonesian coast this week told the AFP a journey marked by hunger, thirst and the violence of the smugglers. At least one woman died during the crossing and her body was thrown overboard, according to several refugees who landed on the island of Sumatra.

As Europe turns its back, the compassionate crisis response of local Greek volunteers, despite harsh austerity, puts the international community to shame.

“Certainly, that has and will change ,” she said, though her organisation does not have any Hong They have been advised that protection visa applications can be very slow, with a wait of around a In the face of international and domestic pressure to commit to opening the door to people from Hong

The Greek government, he said, doesn’t have a solid integration plan for recognized refugees: to help them get jobs and long-term housing and learn the Greek language. He has little faith in HELIOS, an integration program funded by the European Commission.

Related: This Syrian is stuck at a makeshift border camp in Greece

“Greece has never worked with doing integration before. Now, it becomes increasingly difficult because the policy of the government changed. The narrative of the government changed. It became more toxic.”

Lefteris Papagiannakis, SolidarityNow,

“Greece has never worked with doing integration before. Now, it becomes increasingly difficult because the policy of the government changed. The narrative of the government changed. It became more toxic,” Papagiannakis said, adding that the fairly new Greek government, which came into power last summer, has taken an increasingly anti-migrant stance.

Integration, Papagiannakis said, requires the cooperation of Greek society. Greeks need to employ refugees, rent out apartments to them. But people are less willing to do that in this environment.

“Because when you demonize refugees and then you ask from the whole society to show solidarity, it sends mixed messages and in an increasingly toxic environment. And people react. It makes complete sense.”

Greece Says Will Do ‘Whatever It Takes’ to Protect Sovereignty

  Greece Says Will Do ‘Whatever It Takes’ to Protect Sovereignty While Greece is willing to enter into discussions with Turkey on a range of bilateral issues, the government in Athens says it will do whatever it takes to protect its sovereignty. © Bloomberg An employee of the Greek Culture ministry walks in front of the Parthenon temple at the archaeological site of the Acropolis, in Athens, Greece, on Tuesday, May 26, 2020. Greece will allow direct international flights to Athens starting June 15, with other tourist destinations to follow July 1, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said on May 20.

As for the ESTIA program, Papagiannakis said he doesn’t buy that the government has migrants' best interests in mind. He points to the fact that just this month, the government said it was slashing 30% of the program’s budget.

Related: Cross-border tensions wreak havoc on bucolic Greek village

“It is all being done with an end goal to deter people from coming — making things difficult in order for people to be deterred,” he said.

Greece’s Migration and Asylum office did not respond to a request for an interview.

Thousands of refugees are now waiting to see how the new rules will be enforced. More than 6,000 are at risk of being evicted and that number will keep growing every month.

As Kaidi’s deadline approaches July 1, she says she hasn’t been able to get any sleep and doesn’t know what will come next for her family. She does know that she doesn’t want to stay in Greece. When she and her kids get the right travel documents, she wants to try to go to Germany and reunite with some family members who have made it there.

121 University of Washington students test positive for Covid-19 .
More than a hundred students at University of Washington fraternity houses in Seattle have tested positive for Covid-19, the university said Sunday. © cpaulfell/Shutterstock Aerial view of Washington University in Seattle and the University District The university said in a joint news release with the Seattle and King County public health department that 121 students had tested positive for the virus in the fraternity house cluster, 112 of them residents in the Greek Row section north of the campus.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 2
This is interesting!