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World S. Koreans vote for new president to succeed ousted Park

00:56  09 may  2017
00:56  09 may  2017 Source:   ap.org

North Korea Speeds Up Missile Tests To Send Message to Trump

  North Korea Speeds Up Missile Tests To Send Message to Trump "They want to show they can," said one U.S. official. "They believe they learn something new from every launch, success or failure."On Friday, a missile capable of striking targets in South Korea detonated minutes after launch, scattering debris over land and sea. The missile, called the NK-17, is among those the officials said the North has launched knowing they might not be ready.

South Koreans are voting for a new president amid widespread expectations of victory for a liberal candidate. Left-leaning Moon Jae-in, a former human Park , South Korea ' s first female president , is currently jailed at a detention facility near Seoul and awaits a criminal trial set to start later this month.

South Koreans voted Tuesday for a new president , with victory widely predicted for a liberal candidate who has pledged to improve ties with North Park , South Korea ’ s first female president , is jailed at a detention facility near Seoul and awaits a criminal trial set to start later this month.

Moon Jae-in, the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party of Korea, attends his election campaign rally in Seoul, South Korea May 8, 2017. © REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon Moon Jae-in, the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party of Korea, attends his election campaign rally in Seoul, South Korea May 8, 2017. SEOUL, South Korea — South Koreans voted Tuesday for a new president, with victory widely predicted for a liberal candidate who has pledged to improve ties with North Korea, re-examine a contentious U.S. missile defense shield and push sweeping economic changes.

Conservatives worry that a victory by Moon Jae-in might benefit North Korea and put South Korea at odds with its most important ally, the United States.

But Moon has been the clear favorite as the country's powerful conservative forces struggle to regroup after a huge corruption scandal that led to President Park Geun-hye's removal from office and arrest in March.

South Koreans begin early voting to replace ousted Park

  South Koreans begin early voting to replace ousted Park South Koreans began early voting Thursday in the election to replace ousted President Park Geun-hye.Early voters can cast ballots Thursday and Friday at about 3,510 polling stations across the country before the election next Tuesday, the National Election Commission said in a statement.It's South Korea's first presidential election with early voting after introducing it for parliamentary and mayoral elections in recent years, the statement said.Pre-election surveys show liberal candidate Moon Jae-in comfortably leading his two main rivals — a centrist and a conservative.

Millions of South Koreans headed to polls today to elect a new president , a culmination of a two-month race a trailing Because the vote is a special election, the new president will forgo the usual two-month transition and will serve one full, five-year term rather than only completing Park ' s original

Seoul: South Koreans went to the polls Tuesday to choose a new president after Park Geun-Hye was ousted and indicted for corruption, and “I was so disappointed in Park and the establishment”, she told AFP, but refused to say whom she voted for . More than 139,000 voting stations opened at 6 am

"This is the last challenge of my life. I've really done my best so far. I've made enormous preparations. I'm confident. I'll strain every nerve to the last minute to be a president for all the people," Moon, 64, said on the eve of the election.

The final opinion surveys released last week showed Moon, the Democratic Party candidate, had about a 20 percentage point lead over his two main rivals — a centrist and a conservative.

His victory would end a near decade of conservative rule by Park and her predecessor, Lee Myung-bak. When the liberals were last in charge in Seoul, Moon served as chief of staff for then President Roh Moo-hyun. They sought closer ties with North Korea by setting up large-scale aid shipments to the North and by working on now-stalled joint economic projects.

N. Korea again dominates S. Korea's presidential election

  N. Korea again dominates S. Korea's presidential election For South Koreans living next door to a hostile, nuclear-armed state that regularly threatens their annihilation, their vote in Tuesday’s presidential election likely will be based in part on each candidate’s plan for how to handle North Korea. The North Korea conundrum is a perpetual foreign policy headache for South Korea’s leaders and one that is impacting the presidential race in several ways.

Seoul, South Korea — South Koreans voted Tuesday for a new president , with victory widely predicted for a liberal candidate who has pledged to improve ties with North Korea , re-examine a contentious U. S . missile shield, and push sweeping economic changes. Conservatives worry that a

The former South Korean president Park Geun-hye has been sentenced to 24 years in prison for abuse of power and corruption, in a scandal that exposed webs of double-dealing between political leaders and conglomerates, and the power of a Rasputin-like figure at the top of government.

Voting stations opened at 6 a.m. and are to close at 8 p.m. South Korean TV stations plan to release the results of their joint exit polls soon after the vote ends and are expected to predict a winner before midnight.

The winning candidate will be officially sworn in as South Korea's new president after the National Election Commission ends the vote count and confirms the winner on Wednesday. This forgoes the usual two-month transition because Tuesday's vote is a by-election to choose a successor to Park. Her term was originally to end in February 2018. The new leader will still serve out a full, single five-year term.

Park, South Korea's first female president, is currently jailed at a detention facility near Seoul and awaits a criminal trial set to start later this month. She has been indicted on bribery, extortion and other corruption allegations that could theoretically send her to jail for life.

S. Koreans want new leader to create jobs minus corruption

  S. Koreans want new leader to create jobs minus corruption Leading presidential candidates in South Korea have tried to tap into public discontent over youth unemployment and corruption, but the lack of concrete plans means their economic agenda did not gain much attention during the campaign. Demand for change in South Korea's economic system remains high as growth and wealth continue to be concentrated in the hands of top few family-run business giants known as chaebol.Anger over allegations of collusion between big businesses and the government helped trigger massive protests that led to the ouster of President Park Geun-hye in March and the arrest of the Samsung heir.

South Koreans voted Tuesday for a new president , with victory widely predicted for a liberal candidate who has pledged to improve ties with North Park , South Korea ' s first female president , is jailed at a detention facility near Seoul and awaits a criminal trial set to start later this month.

#Live: South Koreans head to the polls to elect a new president to succeed Park Geun-hye, who was impeached and arrested in March over corruption

The allegations incensed many in South Korea, with millions taking to the streets and calling for her ouster. Park sympathizers later staged their own rallies. Dozens of high-profile figures, including Park's longtime confidante, Choi Soon-sil, and Samsung's de facto leader, Lee Jae-yong, have been indicted along with Park.

The drama gave Moon, who lost the 2012 election to Park by a million votes, a boost in his push to re-establish liberal rule.

Frequently appearing at anti-Park rallies, Moon called for her ouster and reform measures to clean up social inequalities, excessive presidential power and corrupt ties between politicians and business leaders. Many of these legacies dated back to when South Korea was ruled by Park's dictator father, Park Chung-hee, a deeply divisive figure whose 18-year rule was marked by both rapid economic rise and severe civil rights abuse.

As a former pro-democracy student activist, Moon was jailed for months in the 1970s while protesting against the senior Park. He later worked as a human rights lawyer and chief of staff for Roh, who governed in 2003-2008.

S.Korea candidates in final push as North assails conservatives

  S.Korea candidates in final push as North assails conservatives South Korea's presidential hopefuls made a final push for votes Monday, with the left-leaning candidate a clear favourite, as the North assailed the outgoing conservative government a day before the polls. A former pro-democracy activist and human rights lawyer, Moon Jae-In of the Democratic Party -- who favours engagement with Pyongyang -- has been leading opinion polls for months.The final Gallup Korea survey of the campaign ahead of Tuesday's vote gave him 38 percent, far ahead of centrist Ahn Cheol-Soo on 20 percent.

South Koreans went to the polls on Tuesday to choose a new president after Park Geun-Hye was ousted and indicted for corruption, against a South Korea ' s rapid growth from the 1970 s to 1990 s pulled a war-ravaged nation out of poverty but slowed as the economy matured, and unemployment

South Koreans vote for new president to succeed ousted Park . Thousands in South Korea march against deployment of US missile system. North Korea threatened to impose the death penalty on the South ' s former president Park Geun-Hye over an alleged plot to assassinate its leader Kim

Moon has called Park Geun-hye's hard-line North Korea policy a failure. If elected he says he'll employ both pressure and dialogue to persuade the North to abandon its nuclear ambitions. He also advocates building up a more assertive South Korea and is critical of Park's decision to allow Washington to install the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) advanced anti-missile system in the South. The system has irked Beijing, Seoul's largest trading partner.

Following a standoff between Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un over Kim's reported nuclear test plans, Moon has talked more about bolstering national defense and said THAAD deployment is inevitable if North Korea provokes. Critics say Moon was looking to woo conservative voters.

"I'll take charge so you won't have to worry about security, national defense and peace," Moon said Monday in a message addressed to senior citizens, many of them conservative voters who oppose Moon because of what they see as a soft North Korea policy.

Even if he becomes leader, many analysts say Moon won't likely pursue drastic rapprochement policies because North Korea's nuclear program has achieved too much progress since he was in the Roh government a decade ago. Foreign experts say it may take only several years for North Korea to develop nuclear-armed missiles that can reach the U.S. mainland. The country may already have shorter-range nuclear missiles that can strike South Korea and Japan.

Moon's nearest rivals are Ahn Cheol-soo, a centrist who has shown a more conservative stance on North Korea, and Hong Joon-pyo, a member of Park's embattled party who has called for the reintroduction of U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in South Korea.

Moon's win shows 'longing' for change: North Korean envoy .
A North Korean diplomat said Monday the election victory by left-leaning South Korean President Moon Jae-In reflected the people's "longing" for change.The comments by ambassador to Beijing Ji Jae-Ryong were the first official response by the North to Moon's triumph last week, except for a four-paragraph dispatch by the official Korean Central News Agency two days after the vote.

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