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World South Korea's new president Moon Jae-in could rattle U.S. relations

19:36  09 may  2017
19:36  09 may  2017 Source:   usatoday.com

Trump invites new South Korean leader to US

  Trump invites new South Korean leader to US President Donald Trump is extending an invitation to the new president of South Korea.The White House says Trump spoke with President Moon Jae-in to congratulate him on his election victory and his country'sThe White House says Trump spoke with President Moon Jae-in to congratulate him on his election victory and his country's "peaceful, democratic transition of power.

Liberal Moon Jae - in won South Korea ’ s presidential election Tuesday after his two main rivals conceded, possibly opening a rift with the United States over relations with Moon argued that the U . S . should have waited for a new president to make the final decision to install the billion system

South Korea President Moon Jae - In speaks during a press conference at the presidential Blue And North Korea ' s ballistic missile technology, if successful, could place the U . S . West Coast within And all politics in South Korea , just like everywhere else, is local. North Korea is the first issue the

Moon Jae-in, presidential candidate of the liberal Democratic Party, receives a bouquet from one of his supporters at his home in Seoul, South Korea, May 9, 2017, as the count of an exit poll indicated a win. © YONHAP, EPA Moon Jae-in, presidential candidate of the liberal Democratic Party, receives a bouquet from one of his supporters at his home in Seoul, South Korea, May 9, 2017, as the count of an exit poll indicated a win.

SEOUL —Liberal Moon Jae-in won South Korea’s presidential election Tuesday after his two main rivals conceded, possibly opening a rift with the United States over relations with North Korea. 

Moon's rise to power in S Korea causes worries, hopes abroad

  Moon's rise to power in S Korea causes worries, hopes abroad Which of South Korea's neighbors and allies stand to benefit most from liberal Moon Jae-in's ascension to the presidency this week?It might be North Korea, which sees Moon as an advocate of a softer approach to ridding the North of nuclear weapons. This, in turn, could alarm a more conservative Washington. Beijing, meanwhile, likely hopes to win big concessions from Moon, and Tokyo worries he'll upset a delicate arrangement meant to settle the two countries' difficult past.

Moon Jae - in ( Korean : 문재인; Hanja: 文在寅; Korean pronunciation: [mundʑɛin] or [mun] [t͡ɕɛin]; born 24 January 1953) is a South Korean politician serving as President of South Korea since 2017.

Moon Jae - in visits the White House this week amid policy rifts with the U . S South Korean President Moon Jae - in arrives in Washington Wednesday for a WASHINGTON — There are plenty of issues that new South Korean President Moon Jae - in and President Trump could disagree on when they

"I will build a new nation. I will make a great Korea, A proud Korea. And I will be the proud president of such a proud nation," the human rights lawyer told supporters in Seoul, the Yonhap News Agency reported. 

Jeff Lee, 50, an international trader, was part of the crowd that gathered in the city's Gwanghwamun Square to cheer Moon's victory, staying until after midnight.  “I came tonight to celebrate the new president,” said Lee, who lives in Seoul. Moon "is not a god but I think he’s trying to solve the problems. Then we can have a future.”

Moon's remarks came after conservative Hong Joon-pyo and centrist Ahn Cheol-soo conceded when an exit poll forecast Moon as the clear winner with 41% of the votes, ending nine years of conservative rule. 

After SKorean leader eyes North trip, Trump offers US invite

  After SKorean leader eyes North trip, Trump offers US invite President Donald Trump on Wednesday invited South Korea's new president to visit the White House after an election victory that could cause friction between the allies over how to deal with North Korea's nuclear threat.Trump wants to tighten an economic vise and has raised the possibility of military force as the North approaches the capability to threaten America with a nuclear-tipped missile. Moon advocates a less confrontational policy. As he took the oath of office Wednesday, Moon Jae-in said he was open to visiting Pyongyang under the right conditions to discuss its nuclear program.

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea elected Moon Jae - in , a human rights lawyer who favors dialogue with North Korea , as president on Tuesday, returning the nation’ s liberals to power after nearly a decade in the political wilderness and setting up a potential rift with the United States over the

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea ’ s newly elected president vowed on Wednesday to play a more assertive role in resolving the North’ s nuclear crisis through dialogue, saying that he was willing to meet with its leader, Kim Jong-un, if the circumstances were right.

The election result was driven largely by domestic concerns over corruption and a slowing economy, but Moon has signaled a softer approach toward neighboring North Korea than his predecessor, the hawkish Park Geun-hye. Park, the nation's first female president, was impeached over corruption charges in March, triggering the election.

Moon, 64, has questioned the effectiveness of the strict sanctions against North Korea and left the door open for greater diplomatic and economic ties with the reclusive communist country. 

"We can’t deny that the ruler of the North Korean people is Kim Jong Un,” Moon said in March. “We have no choice but to recognize Kim Jong Un as a counterpart, whether we put pressure and impose sanctions on North Korea or hold dialogue.”

Moon seeks to re-position South Korea in its dealings with North Korea. “We must lead the efforts to solve problems related to the (Korean) peninsula," he said during his campaign. "And our allies and neighboring countries, including the United States, should take on a role to support our leadership.”

N.Korea says will have dialog with U.S. under right conditions - Yonhap

  N.Korea says will have dialog with U.S. under right conditions - Yonhap A senior North Korean diplomat who handles relations with the United States said on Saturday Pyongyang would have dialog with the U.S. administration if conditions were right, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported. Choe Son Hui, North Korea's foreign ministry director general for U.S. affairs, made the comment to reporters in Beijing as she was traveling home from Norway, Yonhap said."We'll have dialog if the conditions are there," she told reporters when asked if the North was preparing to hold talks with the Trump administration, according to Yonhap.

South Korean President Moon Jae - in has led the country into a historic engagement with the North hoping to cool tensions on the peninsula and solve the nuclear threat from Pyongyang. He was swept to victory in 2017 after a corruption scandal had driven his predecessor Park Geun-hye out of office.

South Korea ' s new President Moon Jae - in has been sworn in, vowing to address the economy and relations with the North in his first speech as president . He said that he would even be willing to visit Pyongyang under the right circumstances. Mr Moon took his oath of office in Seoul' s National

North Korea's recent missile and nuclear tests have drawn strong rebuke from the United States, a longtime ally of South Korea. 

President Trump has talked tough against North Korea, hinting at military action to end its nuclear and missile threats. His comments raised fears of possible retaliation by the North against the South Korean capital of Seoul, a metropolitan area of 25 million a mere 35 miles from the border.

Moon has also criticized the U.S. deployment of an anti-ballistic missile defense system known as THAAD (Terminal High Altitude Area Defense) in South Korea, a military move Park had endorsed. The U.S. began deploying elements of THAAD in late April outside of Seoul and announced it was operational last week.

Moon argued that the U.S. should have waited for a new president to make the final decision to install the $1 billion system, which the Pentagon apparently rushed to make operational for fear Moon might block it if elected.

Trump rattled U.S.-South Korea relations in a recent interview with Reuters when he said he wanted South Korea to pay for the cost of THAAD. "We're going to protect them," Trump said. "But they should pay for that, and they understand that."

Trump also said he planned to renegotiate or scrap the free-trade pact between the U.S. and South Korea, calling it a “horrible” deal.

While Moon's foreign policy positions could alter the dynamics in the region and with the U.S., the election results in many ways were fueled by a strong backlash against Park. 

"At the end of the day, this election is the capstone of the (Park) impeachment,” said John Delury, an associate professor at Yonsei University Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul. Moon "is seen as clean. That’s one way his candidacy makes a lot of sense. He’s the anti-Park Geun-hye, he's the furthest away from her while still being a mainstream choice.” 

China urges S.Korea to 'remove obstacles' to good ties .
China's foreign minister urged South Korea's new government on Thursday to remove "obstacles" to good relations amid Chinese anger at the US deployment of an anti-missile system on the Korean peninsula. Load Error Greeting South Korean presidential envoy Lee Hae-Chan in Beijing, Foreign Minister Wang Yi said bilateral relations have made immense progress over the years."But this year we've had some undeserved setbacks," Wang said, likely in a veiled reference to the Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system that became operational earlier this month.

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