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World Hong Kong activists are holding up blank signs because China now has the power to define pro-democracy slogans as terrorism

17:21  06 july  2020
17:21  06 july  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com

Hong Kong marks handover anniversary as national security law takes effect

  Hong Kong marks handover anniversary as national security law takes effect Hong Kong marks handover anniversary as national security law takes effectThe contentious law will punish crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison, heralding a more authoritarian era for China's freest city.

a group of people posing for the camera: Pro-democracy demonstrators take part in a lunchtime protest against China's national security-law at the IFC shopping mall in Hong Kong on July 6, 2020. REUTERS/Joyce Zhou © REUTERS/Joyce Zhou Pro-democracy demonstrators take part in a lunchtime protest against China's national security-law at the IFC shopping mall in Hong Kong on July 6, 2020. REUTERS/Joyce Zhou
  • Protesters in Hong Kong are holding up blank signs to dodge China's new national-security law, which was imposed on the city last week.
  • The law gives China vast discretion to define and punish instances of "separatism, subversion, terrorism" in the city.
  • For this reason, dozens of people gathered for a silent protest with white signs at malls around the city on Monday.
  • Scroll down to see photos.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Hong Kong protesters are holding up white signs after China passed a new security law that gives them the power to label pro-democracy slogans as sedition or terrorism.

Taiwan advises its residents not to go to Hong Kong or to China

 Taiwan advises its residents not to go to Hong Kong or to China HONG-KONG-EVENTS-TAIWAN: Taiwan advises its residents not to go to Hong Kong or to China © Reuters / JAMES POMFRET TAIWAN RECOMMENDS ITS INHABITANTS TO GO TO HONG KONG OR CHINA TAIPEH (Reuters) - The Taiwanese authorities on Thursday advised their fellow citizens not to go or transit through Hong Kong but also Macao and mainland China following the promulgation of the law on security came into effect in the former British colony.

Photos showed around 200 people stood on balconies surrounding the central atrium of the APM mall in Kwun Tong district on Monday.

Other photos showed people taking part in a Monday lunchtime protest at the luxury IFC mall.

Most protesters held aloft white, blank sheets of paper, though some still carried signs bearing words and graphics.

One protester at IFC mall held up a sign bearing an anti-government slogans like: "Five demands, not one less," in a reference to demands made by pro-democracy activists last year; and "Carrie Lam, resign," in reference to the city's chief executive, who promulgated the law.

Hong Kong: The government declares a slogan dear to the protesters

 Hong Kong: The government declares a slogan dear to the protesters HONG-KONG-EVENTS: Hong Kong: The government declares a slogan dear to the protesters © Reuters / SHANNON STAPLETON HONG KONG: THE GOVERNMENT DECLARES AN ILLEGAL SLOGAN TO DEAR DEMONSTRANTS HONG KONG (Reuters) - The slogan "Free Hong Kong, revolution of our time", regularly chanted during the pro-democracy demonstrations that have shaken the city, evokes separatism or subversion, the local government said on Thursday, doing reference to crimes punished by the new security law imposed by Beijing.

The IFC protest was silent, but riot police arrived after protesters began to chant "liberate Hong Kong," according to local media outlet RTHK.

Here's what the IFC mall protest looked like:

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And here's what the APM mall protest looked like:

a group of people looking at a cell phone: A group of Hong Kongers at a silent protest in a mall in the city on July 6, 2020. Twitter/XinqiSu © Twitter/XinqiSu A group of Hong Kongers at a silent protest in a mall in the city on July 6, 2020. Twitter/XinqiSu a group of people posing for the camera: Police in a stand off with protesters in the APM mall in Hong Kong on July 6, 2020. Twitter/XinqiSu © Twitter/XinqiSu Police in a stand off with protesters in the APM mall in Hong Kong on July 6, 2020. Twitter/XinqiSu

China passed the National Security Law for Hong Kong last Tuesday, despite opposition from the US, EU, and UK, and weeks of protest in the city.

The wording of the law is vague, but it essentially means that anything that China believes to be "separatism, subversion, terrorism" in Hong Kong can be punished under the law.

One protester at IFC, identified only as Tam, told RTHK that the white signs "show that there is a 'white terror' in Hong Kong."

Democracy books disappear from Hong Kong libraries

  Democracy books disappear from Hong Kong libraries Books written by prominent Hong Kong democracy activists have started to disappear from the city's libraries, online records show, days after Beijing imposed a draconian national security law on the finance hub. Among the authors whose titles are no longer available are Joshua Wong, one of the city's most prominent young activists, and Tanya Chan, a well known pro-democracy lawmaker. Beijing's new national security law was imposed on Tuesday and is the most radical shift in how the semi-autonomous city is run since it was handed back to China by Britain in 1997.

Blank signs have been seen in other parts of Hong Kong too.

Hong Kong's libraries have also started removing books by pro-democracy activists from their shelves and catalogs.

Some campaigners have deleted their social media or even fled the city.

The UK has offered a path to citizenship for 3 million Hong Kongers in the wake of the national-security law. The US and Australia are also considering moves to help Hong Kong residents trying to flee.

Read the original article on Business Insider

China Condemns Hong Kong Democrats’ ‘Foreign’ Linked Primaries .
China condemned Hong Kong’s pro-democracy opposition for holding a primary contest ahead of key elections, saying the exercise was supported by “foreign forces” and may violate the city’s new national security law. The central government’s Liaison Office in Hong Kong said in a statement late Monday the primaries were “illegal.” That echoes previous statements from top Hong Kong government officials that the opposition primaries could fall afoul of the sweeping new security measures imposed by Beijing in late June.

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