•   
  •   
  •   

World South Africa Continues Rolling Power Blackouts as Demand Rises

12:50  11 july  2020
12:50  11 july  2020 Source:   bloomberg.com

'We are not guinea pigs,' say South African anti-vaccine protesters

  'We are not guinea pigs,' say South African anti-vaccine protesters 'We are not guinea pigs,' say South African anti-vaccine protestersLast Wednesday, the University of the Witwatersrand in partnership with Oxford University rolled out South Africa's first clinical trial, which will consist of 2,000 volunteers.

South Africa announced the biggest rolling power blackouts in its history after more than a quarter of the generating capacity at its troubled state electricity monopoly broke down. Eskom, which produces nearly all the electricity for Africa ’s most industrialised nation, said on Monday that it would remove an

PHOLA, South Africa — President Cyril Ramaphosa of South Africa assumed power promising a “new dawn.” But just over a year later, he can’t keep the nation’s lights on. A month before a national election, the worst rolling blackouts in years are regularly plunging South Africans into the dark.

(Bloomberg) --

a large tower in a city: Electricity cables run above residential shacks as the sun rises in the Saulsville township, Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday, May 31, 2019. While South African President Cyril Ramaphosa says power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. is considered too big to fail, it could be too big to support because of the costs associated with stabilizing its finances, Engineering News reported, citing S&P Global Ratings Director Ravi Bhatia. © Bloomberg Electricity cables run above residential shacks as the sun rises in the Saulsville township, Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday, May 31, 2019. While South African President Cyril Ramaphosa says power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. is considered too big to fail, it could be too big to support because of the costs associated with stabilizing its finances, Engineering News reported, citing S&P Global Ratings Director Ravi Bhatia.

South Africa’s rolling electricity blackouts will continue for a second day on Saturday because a cold spell is pushing up demand on an already wobbly generation system.

Collins Khosa, the South African George Floyd

 Collins Khosa, the South African George Floyd © Nardus Engelbrecht Protesters outside the Cape Town Parliament on June 3, after the death of Collins Khosa. A father in his forties is one of the 11 South Africans killed by the security forces during the very strict confinement imposed in the country to fight against the coronavirus. "Senzeni na? Sono sethu, ubumyama? ” What have we done ? Is our sin to be black? This song of mourning and struggle, whose complaint was raised during the funeral under apartheid, is not out of date.

South Africa has been hit by a sixth straight day of rolling blackouts as state-owned power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. acts to prevent a total collapse Read more: Record Blackouts Shut South Africa Mines as Recession Risk Rises . Here are the latest developments, updated throughout the day.

A rolling blackout , also referred to as rotational load shedding or feeder rotation, is an intentionally engineered electrical power shutdown where electricity delivery is stopped for non-overlapping periods of time over different parts of the distribution region.

National power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. said its cutting 2,000 megawatts from the network throughout the day after plant breakdowns reduced capacity. The company has struggled to maintain stable generation capacity and resumed power cuts on Friday. Supply had stabilized in the past four months when the coronavirus outbreak and a national lockdown shuttered most economic activities.

a large tower in a city: Electricity cables run above residential shacks as the sun rises in the Saulsville township, Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday, May 31, 2019. While South African President Cyril Ramaphosa says power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. is considered too big to fail, it could be too big to support because of the costs associated with stabilizing its finances, Engineering News reported, citing S&P Global Ratings Director Ravi Bhatia. © Bloomberg Electricity cables run above residential shacks as the sun rises in the Saulsville township, Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday, May 31, 2019. While South African President Cyril Ramaphosa says power utility Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. is considered too big to fail, it could be too big to support because of the costs associated with stabilizing its finances, Engineering News reported, citing S&P Global Ratings Director Ravi Bhatia.

The shortages, also known as load shedding, darkens the outlook for Africa’s most industrialized economy, which is forecast to contract 7.2% this year. Eskom, which hasn’t had a stable generation system for more than a decade, is saddled with a debt pile of 450 billion rand ($27 billion).

“Continuing with load shedding is necessary in order to replenish the emergency generation reserves to better prepare for the coming week,” Eskom said. “Due to the much colder weather, demand has also risen significantly.”

A cold front hit South Africa on Thursday with some parts of the country, particularly the Western Cape province, experiencing localized flooding, gale-force winds and snowfall, according to the South African weather service.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Cecil Rhodes statue decapitated in South Africa .
A statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes has been decapitated in Cape Town, South African National Parks said on Wednesday. © MIKE HUTCHINGS/REUTERS A damaged bust of Cecil John Rhodes, a controversial figure in the history of South Africa, is seen after the statue had been vandalised and had the head removed in Cape Town, South Africa, July 14, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY The statue, which sits on the northern slope of Table Mountain, a popular tourist attraction, was vandalized earlier this week, Rey Thakhuli from SANParks said in a statement.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!