•   
  •   
  •   

World Sudanese rebels and government enter final phase of talks

16:06  16 july  2020
16:06  16 july  2020 Source:   msn.com

UN chief denounces 'unprecedented' foreign interference in Libya

  UN chief denounces 'unprecedented' foreign interference in Libya UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Wednesday that foreign interference in the Libya conflict has reached "unprecedented levels," with sophisticated equipment and mercenaries involved in the fighting. "The conflict has entered a new phase with foreign interference reaching unprecedented levels, including in the delivery of sophisticated equipment and the number of mercenaries involved in the fighting," he said.Guterres denounced the situation during a ministers-level UN Security Council video conference, expressing particular concern about the military forces massing around the city of Sirte, halfway between Tripoli in the west and Benghazi in the east.

Sudanese Vice-President Ali Usman Taha and rebel leader John Garang have launched the final phase of talks aimed at ending 21 years of civil war. The government and the SPLM/A rebels . signed landmark protocols on 26 May on how to share power and manage three disputed areas.

ADDIS ABABA –– South Sudanese rebels and a government delegation started peace talks on Tuesday to try to end fighting that has left the world’s newest state on the brink of civil After opening, the talks quickly took a break to allow consultations in Juba about the release of detained rebels .

The Sudanese government and a coalition of rebel groups on Thursday entered into a final phase of peace talks, which will centre on the creation of a unified Sudanese army.

a person holding a sign: Peace demand: A demonstrator in Khartoum on July 4 holds up a sign reading 'All of the country is Darfur - #PeaceFirst' © ASHRAF SHAZLY Peace demand: A demonstrator in Khartoum on July 4 holds up a sign reading 'All of the country is Darfur - #PeaceFirst'

Mediators described the discussions as the "most important" component of the Sudan peace process, which aims to restore stability to the war-torn regions of Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

Vinyl treasures: the musical selection of "World Africa" ​​# 9

 Vinyl treasures: the musical selection of German and French labels are re-publishing nuggets of Cape Verdean coladeira, Sudanese jazz and Congolese rumba. Every Wednesday, Le Monde Afrique presents three musical novelties from or inspired by the continent. This week, we offer you a leap into the past, with the vinyl reissue (and digital version) of songs that it would have been a shame to forget… “Fundo de Mare Palinha”, by Voz di Sanicolau Rotterdam, 1976.

The Sudanese government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement have now agreed on a permanent cease-fire and details of how to implement Negotiators are expected next month to wrap up the peace deal, which is the culmination of two years of talks that took place in Kenya.

South Sudan became independent from Sudan in 2011, but civil war broke out two years later between the government led by Kiir and a rebel movement led by Machar. Fuelled by personal and ethnic rivalries, the conflict has killed tens of thousands, displaced an estimated quarter of South Sudan ’s

"This is the last chapter and the biggest chapter, the security arrangements in the peace negotiations. If we negotiate the security arrangements very well and in good faith we will have reached a sincere comprehensive peace agreement," said mediator Tutkew Gatluak in Juba, South Sudan.

The peace talks, which began in South Sudan in October, aim to end conflicts in three regions where rebels have fought bloody campaigns against marginalisation by Khartoum under ousted president Omar al-Bashir.

Hopes of a deal were raised after Sudan's transitional government, led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, made ending conflict in these areas a priority.

Sudan to allow drinking alcohol for non-Muslims, ban FGM

  Sudan to allow drinking alcohol for non-Muslims, ban FGM Sudan to allow drinking alcohol for non-Muslims, ban FGMKHARTOUM (Reuters) - Sudan will permit non-Muslims to consume alcohol and strengthen women's rights, including banning female genital mutilation (FGM), its justice minister said late on Saturday, in a reversal of almost four decades of hardline Islamist policies.

South Sudan government delegates during the recent talks in Addis Ababa (J. Tanza/VOA). Lasu said, referring to the second phase of the South Sudan peace initiative. A South Sudan army spokesperson dismissed the accusations, saying it was the rebels who were attacking government Both government and opposition forces have committed multiple violations since the cease-fire pact

Sudan 's government and armed rebel groups have signed a ceasefire agreement to allow humanitarian relief into the war-torn parts of the Daglo also commended Kiir's efforts for sponsoring Sudan 's peace talks . Kiir called on the Sudanese rivals to proceed with their talks until a final peace

Some of the issues already agreed upon include wealth and power-sharing, and autonomy for the Blue Nile and Kordofan regions.

Alhadi Idris Yahya, chairman of the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) -- a coalition of nine rebel groups negotiating with the Sudanese government -- said the parties had agreed the SRF would have three seats in the sovereign council, currently running the country.

It would also get 25 percent of seats in parliament and the executive branch of government.

The parties have also agreed on a timeline of 39 months for a transitional period after the signing of a comprehensive peace agreement.

"(...) At the end of the day the main aim of the security arrangements is to have what we call one unified Sudan army. As we speak now we have several armies ... and it is not an ideal situation in one country to have more than an army," said Yayha.

A second coalition of rebel groups, the Sudan People's Liberation Movement–North (SPLM-N) from South Kordofan is negotiating separately.

They want a secular state or alternatively, self-determination for their region.

str-fb/ri

Sudan finds bodies of 1990 coup plotters in mass grave .
The bodies of 28 Sudanese army officers involved in a failed coup against former president Omar al-Bashir in 1990 have been found in a mass grave, prosecutors said on Thursday. In April 1990, the officers had surrounded an army headquarters and several barracks before being arrested and killed. Bashir, 76, and many of his aides have been kept in Khartoum's Kober prison on multiple charges since being ousted.He has already been convicted of corruption and is currently on trial over the Islamist-backed 1989 military coup that brought him to power.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!