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World Hong Kong Democrats Get Questionnaires to Prove Poll Eligibility

17:02  25 july  2020
17:02  25 july  2020 Source:   bloomberg.com

Hong Kong's competitive edge blunted by US-China storm

  Hong Kong's competitive edge blunted by US-China storm Beijing's tough new security law and President Donald Trump's order to rescind special trading privileges have blunted Hong Kong's competitive edge and risk turning the finance hub into just another Chinese city, analysts warn. Once lauded as an oasis of predictability in Asia, semi-autonomous Hong Kong has been plunged into crisis over the past year, threatening its status as a reliable world-class business centre. As 2019 came to a close, theOnce lauded as an oasis of predictability in Asia, semi-autonomous Hong Kong has been plunged into crisis over the past year, threatening its status as a reliable world-class business centre.

Hong Kong democrats score a landslide local election landslide victory after months of protests. The pro- democracy camp only secured around 100 seats at the previous polls four years ago. Almost three million people voted, a record turnout of more than 71% that appeared to have been spurred by

Hong Kong 's legislature has formally withdrawn a controversial extradition bill that has sparked months of unrest. The bill - which would have allowed for criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China - prompted outrage when it was introduced in April.

(Bloomberg) -- At least seven potential pro-democracy candidates for Hong Kong’s Legislative Council elections in September have received questionnaires from the government asking them to show they haven’t violated the city’s mini constitution or recently imposed security law.

Alvin Yeung in a suit sitting at a table: Alvin Yeung, incoming lawmaker and acting leader of the Civic Party, speaks during an oath-taking ceremony in the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Three incoming Hong Kong lawmakers were temporarily blocked from participating in legislative meetings after inserting pro-democracy protests and apparent insults against China into their oaths of office. © Bloomberg Alvin Yeung, incoming lawmaker and acting leader of the Civic Party, speaks during an oath-taking ceremony in the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Three incoming Hong Kong lawmakers were temporarily blocked from participating in legislative meetings after inserting pro-democracy protests and apparent insults against China into their oaths of office.

Alvin Yeung and Cheng Tat-hung of the Civic Party, Kenneth Leung who plans to represent the accountancy sector, and four other opposition figures received letters of inquiry from their respective electoral officers requesting that they validate their applications for the elections, according to reports in Ming Pao, HK01 and Stand News.

China Begins to Remove Democratic Taiwan’s Toehold in Hong Kong

  China Begins to Remove Democratic Taiwan’s Toehold in Hong Kong For decades, Hong Kong served as a bridge between China and Taiwan. Now, that appears to be just one more thing that’s changing in the former British colony. China’s insistence that Taiwanese officials as a condition of stay in Hong Kong sign a statement agreeing that both sides belong to “one China” adds pressure on Taipei to close its de facto consulate in the city. The decision not only potentially impacts millions of people who travel between the two places each year, it also chips away at the city’s role as a gateway from China to the democratic world.

The Democratic Party (DP) is a centre-left liberal political party in Hong Kong established in 1994. Chaired by legislator Wu Chi-wai, it is currently the third largest party in the Legislative Council of Hong Kong , having seven seats and 89 District Councillors.

Tanya Chan, Civic Party lawmaker and convenor of the pro- democracy camp, called on Lam to resign as she had become the “common enemy of the Hong Kong people.” “Lam’s approval rating is at a record low… it is the wish of most Hongkongers that she resign,” Chan said.

Yeung was asked to explain his recent visit to the U.S. where he met American officials and called for sanctions against certain Hong Kong officials, and if he will continue lobbying foreign governments, according to the letter seen by Bloomberg. It cited Yeung’s social-media posts and media interviews.

“Your requests to foreign countries to make legislation to sanction the Hong Kong government is in fact pressuring the government with the help of foreign powers and inviting foreign forces to interfere in Hong Kong’s internal affairs,” the letter to Yeung said. “How would such behavior concur with what you declared in your nomination statement to ‘uphold the Basic Law and to pledge allegiance to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region’?

Hong Kong’s new reality dawns as city feels chill of national security law

  Hong Kong’s new reality dawns as city feels chill of national security law Hong Kong's semi-autonomy and freedoms hang in the balance. MORE: China says it will retaliate after US orders its Houston consulate to close The law targets what China calls crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. The law carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and in some cases suspects could be sent to mainland China for trial. Beijing says it's necessary to stop the city's unrest.

A top adviser to Hong Kong 's leader has urged the government to consider online voting and other alternatives to postponing the Legislative Council elections, fearing delaying the polls would be politically risky and could hamper investor confidence in the city. Executive Council member Ronny

Hong Kong starts off 2020 protesting again. Only 17% of Hong Kongers say they want independence from China with just 20% saying China has abused the “one country, two systems” model to favor Beijing, a Reuters poll released on December 31 shows.

Alvin Yeung in a suit sitting at a table: Alvin Yeung, incoming lawmaker and acting leader of the Civic Party, speaks during an oath-taking ceremony in the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Three incoming Hong Kong lawmakers were temporarily blocked from participating in legislative meetings after inserting pro-democracy protests and apparent insults against China into their oaths of office. © Bloomberg Alvin Yeung, incoming lawmaker and acting leader of the Civic Party, speaks during an oath-taking ceremony in the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Three incoming Hong Kong lawmakers were temporarily blocked from participating in legislative meetings after inserting pro-democracy protests and apparent insults against China into their oaths of office.

Beijing passed a national security law late June for the former British colony, criminalizing subversion and collusion with foreign forces, with the maximum punishment being a life sentence.

The city’s pro-democracy parties this month held a two-day primary, drawing more than 600,000 voters in an effort to narrow a surge of candidates ahead of the September elections. Hong Kong’s government and China’s top agency in the city have said the process could violate the new security measures, and pledged to investigate and possibly prosecute the primary’s organizers.

On trial on riot charges, Hong Kong newlyweds prepared for life apart

  On trial on riot charges, Hong Kong newlyweds prepared for life apart On trial on riot charges, Hong Kong newlyweds prepared for life apart HONG KONG (Reuters) - For Valentine's Day this year, Henry Tong gave his wife, Elaine To, a photo book. It holds the memories of their life together: their first date six years ago, kissing in front of a pro-democracy "Lennon wall"; the tattooed bands on their ring fingers, symbolizing a bond not easily erased; and their wedding day last year, when he vowed to her, "Not even a nuclear explosion could break us apart.

The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB) is a pro-Beijing conservative political party established in 1992 in Hong Kong .

Pro- democracy lawmakers and a civil rights group have questioned the police use of a “kettling” tactic on Sunday night to clear protesters from a crowded shopping mall. Meanwhile, pro-Beijing legislators have condemned the violent scenes, urging the public to respect officers.

China’s Smothering of Hong Kong Has Democrats Preparing for Jail

The unofficial voting process was designed to overcome fractures in the opposition movement between traditional democrats and more radical so-called “localists,” and present an organized slate of candidates that could then benefit from the momentum generated by last year’s historic protests to oust pro-establishment rivals.

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Video: Democracy activist Joshua Wong launches bid for Hong Kong legislature (Reuters)

A US citizen reportedly had a warrant issued for his arrest by Hong Kong authorities under its strict new national security law .
Hong Kong issued warrants for six foreign citizens in its first use of a sweeping law to target overseas pro-democracy activists.Chinese state-run media reported that the men are wanted by authorities for "incitement to secession" under a sweeping and controversial national-security law passed last month, according to The Guardian.

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