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World In shadow of China war games, Taiwan bids farewell to 'Mr Democracy'

13:20  19 september  2020
13:20  19 september  2020 Source:   reuters.com

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By Ben Blanchard and Ann Wang

a man and a woman looking at the camera: Staff wear face masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease ( COVID-19) at the entrance of late Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui memorial service in Taipei © Reuters/ANN WANG Staff wear face masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease ( COVID-19) at the entrance of late Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui memorial service in Taipei

TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan bid farewell on Saturday to former president Lee Teng-hui, dubbed "Mr. Democracy" for ending autocratic rule in favor of free elections and championing Taiwan's separate identity from China, as Beijing again sent jets close to the island.

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Lee's memorial service took place in the shadow of renewed Chinese war games, as did his election as Taiwan's first democratic leader in 1996. China claims the island as its own territory.

Lee Teng-hui standing in a room: Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen attends a memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui at a chapel of Aletheia University in New Taipei City © Reuters/POOL Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen attends a memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui at a chapel of Aletheia University in New Taipei City

Lee, who died in July, was president from 1988 to 2000.

His greatest act of defiance was becoming Taiwan's first democratically elected president in March 1996, achieved in a landslide following eight months of intimidating war games and missile tests by China in waters around the island.

Tsai Ing-wen, Lee Teng-hui standing in front of a crowd: Memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui in New Taipei City © Reuters/POOL Memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui in New Taipei City

Those events brought China and Taiwan to the verge of conflict, prompting the United States to send an aircraft carrier task force to the area in a warning to the Beijing government.

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On Friday and again on Saturday, China carried out drills in the Taiwan Strait, sending 19 aircraft near the island on Saturday alone, as Beijing expressed anger at the visit of a senior U.S. official to Taipei, there for Lee's memorial.[nL4N2GG046]

Speaking at the memorial service in a chapel at a Taipei university, President Tsai Ing-wen said he had shaped the Taiwan of today.

"Confronted with daunting international challenges, he skilfully led the people of Taiwan by promoting pragmatic diplomacy. Taiwan became synonymous with democracy and was catapulted onto the world stage. Because of this, President Lee came to be lauded as Mr. Democracy," Tsai said. "Thanks to his efforts, Taiwan now shines as a beacon of democracy."

a group of people sitting at a table: Memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui in New Taipei City © Reuters/POOL Memorial service for late Taiwan president Lee Teng-hui in New Taipei City

Lee, a devout Christian, was 97.

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U.S. Undersecretary for Economic Affairs Keith Krach and former Japanese prime minister Yoshiro Mori also attended his memorial, and Japan's de facto ambassador in Taiwan read a statement from recently resigned Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, whom Beijing also reviles as a separatist, sent a recorded video message for his "close friend" Lee.

"Now he is no longer here, but we Buddhists believe in life after life, so most probably he will be reborn in Taiwan," he said.

Lee's remains will be interred at a military cemetery next month.

(Reporting by Ann Wang and Ben Blanchard; Editing by Michael Perry, Gerry Doyle and William Mallard)


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