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World Malaysia's Political Jockeying Is a Distraction

02:47  25 september  2020
02:47  25 september  2020 Source:   bloomberg.com

Malaysia opposition leader Anwar says seeking to form new government

  Malaysia opposition leader Anwar says seeking to form new government Malaysia opposition leader Anwar says seeking to form new governmentAnwar, who will need the king's assent to replace current premier Muhyiddin Yassin, told a news conference his support from lawmakers "means that the administration of Muhyiddin has fallen".

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- Once a bastion of political stability in a troubled region, Malaysia faces the prospect of its third government in little more than six months. A war of attrition over the premiership is the last thing the country needs.Gross domestic product shrank 17.1% in the second quarter

Politics of Malaysia takes place in the framework of a federal representative democratic constitutional monarchy, in which the Yang di-Pertuan Agong is head of state and the Prime Minister of Malaysia is the head of government.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a close up of a man wearing glasses and looking at the camera: Anwar Ibrahim, founder of Malaysia's People's Justice Party, listens during a Bloomberg Television interview in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Anwar, who’s in line to become Malaysia’s next prime minister, sought to reassure foreign investors concerned about recent decisions to scrap several high-profile infrastructure projects in a bid to reduce debt. © Bloomberg Anwar Ibrahim, founder of Malaysia's People's Justice Party, listens during a Bloomberg Television interview in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Anwar, who’s in line to become Malaysia’s next prime minister, sought to reassure foreign investors concerned about recent decisions to scrap several high-profile infrastructure projects in a bid to reduce debt.

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- Once a bastion of political stability in a troubled region, Malaysia faces the prospect of its third government in little more than six months. A war of attrition over the premiership is the last thing the country needs.

Malaysia’s King Has Several Options After Anwar’s Power Play

  Malaysia’s King Has Several Options After Anwar’s Power Play Malaysia’s king is set to play a key role in what happens next after opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim claimed he had majority support to form a government. The monarch, known as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, plans to hold an audience with Anwar soon to give him the opportunity to prove his assertion, after postponing a Tuesday meeting for health reasons. There’s no exact time set yet.

This month the government of Najib Razak broke with precedent by allowing the opposition to stage a rally as election season kicks into gear.

This is a list of political parties in Malaysia , including existing and historical ones. Under the current legislation, all political parties (termed " Political Associations"

Gross domestic product shrank 17.1% in the second quarter, the worst performance in East Asia, and deflation is taking root. Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin came to power in March, just as the pandemic began rippling through the region. His support  never looked very solid

That shaky backdrop has opened the door for the latest leadership challenge. On Wednesday,  Anwar Ibrahim, a one-time establishment insider now heading up the opposition, shocked  investors by asserting he has more than enough votes in parliament to command a majority and oust Muhyiddin. While Anwar’s announcement hasn’t been matched by public declarations of support, it was jarring enough to push stocks lower and nudge the currency to a two-week low. 

Malaysia power struggle set to drag on as king recuperates

  Malaysia power struggle set to drag on as king recuperates Opposition leader’s meeting with King Sultan Abdullah cancelled after monarch taken to hospital for observation.Anwar said this week he has secured a “strong, formidable” majority from lawmakers in parliament to remove Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin.

Malaysia is one of the great Asian success stories. It has enjoyed a growth rate of up to 8% for much of the past 20 years, and the fruits Such racially diverse societies are extremely difficult to govern, and it is to Malaysia ' s enormous credit that it has combined economic growth with relative racial harmony

Malaysia is located on a strategic sea-lane that exposes it to global trade and various cultures. Strictly, the name " Malaysia " is a modern concept, created in the second half of the 20th century.

The premier says he isn't going anywhere and is focused on trying to contain Covid-19 and lift the economy out of a historic recession — effectively challenging Anwar to put up or shut up. There’s no denying Anwar has come close to the apex of power in Malaysia in the past, only to stumble, or get tripped, before the finish line. 

With an abundance of salon intrigue, the political class at times appears out to lunch on basic governing needs. Within Muhyiddin’s camp, backers have engaged in public spats about who gets to contest electoral districts and which supporters get plum public-sector jobs. Four stimulus packages have been passed mostly by decree; other critical things like raising the debt ceiling need legislation. Demonstrating a working majority is critical, but Muhyiddin's is so thin he appears wary of risking a public vote.

It wasn't always this way. For most of its six decades of nationhood, the country was able to steer a middle ground in Southeast Asia. One coalition ruled for most of that time and returned at regular elections. By contrast, neighboring Indonesia has been prone to epic crackups that degenerate into communal violence. In Thailand, the military regularly installs and sacks cabinets, and Ferdinand Marcos in the Philippines was able to seize power and rule as an autocrat for years before getting overthrown. Now, power in Malaysia risks falling into a disturbing pattern: a few lawmakers switch sides and unseat governments outside of elections.

Malaysia Ruling Party’s Pick for Sabah Minister Could Fray Ties

  Malaysia Ruling Party’s Pick for Sabah Minister Could Fray Ties Malaysia’s ruling coalition named their candidate for chief minister in the key state of Sabah on Monday, in a move that could fray ties between the parties behind Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin. © Photographer: -/AFP/Getty Images President of the Sabah Heritage Party Shafie Apdal votes during state elections in Semporna, a town in Malaysia's Sabah state on Borneo island, on September 26, 2020. Muhyiddin’s Bersatu party named one of its own, Hajiji Mohd Noor, to be sworn into office at the state palace Tuesday, Hajiji said in a televised press conference.

Malaysia is a multi-ethnic country, with a predominately Muslim population. Accusations of racism stem from racial preferences embodied within the social and economic policy of the Malaysian government, as well as broader tensions between various ethnic groups.

However, those of us with a memory longer than a month, may recall a very different reaction when another world leader suggested an upcoming The same publications that are praising Ms Ardern for her selflessness in delaying her election, dedicated copious column inches to blasting Donald Trump.

That’s what Anwar's gambit would mean. Neither he nor Muhyiddin want the stalemate broken by the monarch — whose role is largely ceremonial — dissolving parliament and calling a fresh election. Each man worries that he would lose. Provincial balloting this weekend in Sabah is the next potential trip wire; the northeastern Borneo state is one of the few local administrations not allied to Muhyiddin's bloc. The return of the state government would be seen as a rebuff of the prime minister and, in theory, a plus for Anwar.

The fractured nature of the opposition is also part of the story here. Before March, Anwar looked on course to assume the premiership later this year, such was the gentleman's agreement with then-Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. The two had history: Back in the 1990s, Anwar was also heir apparent to Mahathir, when both held office under a different political grouping, the Barisan Nasional, which had run the country since independence. But Anwar fell out with Mahathir and was jailed. The two men reconciled and united to defeat Barisan, which they claimed had succumbed to graft. Najib Razak, the last Barisan leader to occupy the premier’s job, was convicted and sentenced to prison  for his role in the 1MDB saga. (Najib has appealed.) 

Zaid Jilani calls attacks on Trump court pick's adopted children a 'massive distraction'

  Zaid Jilani calls attacks on Trump court pick's adopted children a 'massive distraction' Journalist Zaid Jilani on Monday called attacks on President Trump's Supreme Court pick's adopted children a "massive distraction" from debates over issues that she'd be handling on the high court.Jilani criticized author Ibrahim Kendi on Hill.TV's Rising for his comments on Twitter that suggested Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and her husband could be considered "White colonizers" because they adopted two Black children from Haiti. "It is a massive distraction from the issues of what the Supreme Court is actually ruling on and dealing with," he said.

Malaysia ’ s Preventable Coronavirus Disaster. The country’s newest leaders should have jumped into action immediately. Instead, they wasted precious weeks jockeying over cabinet positions. Krithika Varagur. Malaysia ’ s Geriatric Palace Intrigues Are Causing Political Turmoil.

World leaders have often been tempted to divert attention from problems at home with projects abroad.

The terms of the Mahathir-Anwar peace treaty were that Mahathir, now in his 90s, would stand aside for Anwar after a few years. They could never fully reconcile, however. Their supporters split, enabling Muhyiddin to ascend. Anwar is on the outside wanting desperately back in; Mahathir says he'll wait and see how things pan out.

This isn't just a storm within the ethnic Malay community, which has long formed the backbone of politics and policy. The region has much at stake in Malaysian stability. The nation is a major exporter of electronics and tied intimately to the global economic cycle. It sits astride the vital sea lanes of the Straits of Malacca and is one of the claimants on tracts of the South China Sea.

Consistency and continuity count for a lot in such a diverse corner of the world. Unfortunately, these virtues tend to get noticed only once they are gone. Soon after Muhyiddin was installed in March, I wrote that Malaysia's politics had come to resemble the divisions over faith, ethnicity and urban-rural cleavage that characterized Brexit and Donald Trump. Malaysia can do better. Considering his reputation as a reformer and champion of civil society, so can Anwar.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Daniel Moss is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian economies. Previously he was executive editor of Bloomberg News for global economics, and has led teams in Asia, Europe and North America.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Malaysian leaders draw flak after post-election virus jump .
Malaysian leaders draw flak after post-election virus jumpKUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Malaysians took to social media on Friday to lambast politicians for violating social distancing protocols and refusing to self-isolate, after the country recorded its second-highest spike in daily coronavirus cases following a state election last week.

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