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World Retired Colonel Bah Ndaw sworn in as Mali interim president

15:20  25 september  2020
15:20  25 september  2020 Source:   reuters.com

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BAMAKO (Reuters) - Retired Colonel Bah Ndaw was sworn in on Friday as Mali's interim president, tasked with presiding over an 18-month transition back to civilian rule following the Aug. 18 military coup.

a man wearing a hat: The new interim president of Mali, former colonel Ndaw, is pictured with Colonel Assimi Goita, leader of Malian military junta after a meeting with Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) mediators in Bamako © Reuters/STRINGER The new interim president of Mali, former colonel Ndaw, is pictured with Colonel Assimi Goita, leader of Malian military junta after a meeting with Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) mediators in Bamako

Junta leader Colonel Assimi Goita was sworn in as the vice president of the transition during a ceremony in Bamako.

Malian officials hope the inauguration of Ndaw, a 70-year-old former defence minister, will lead to the lifting of economic sanctions imposed by Mali's West African neighbours after President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's overthrow.

Goodluck Jonathan, the envoy for the 15-member Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), said on Wednesday that he hoped sanctions would be lifted following Ndaw's inauguration, although no decision has yet been taken.

(Reporting by Tiemoko Diallo; Writing by Aaron Ross; Editing by Bate Felix)

Fragile hopes in DR Congo's Ituri province, scarred by conflict .
"The future is dark," sighs Joachim Lobo, a teacher who longs "to pick up the chalk" and be reunited with his pupils, if ever peace is restored to northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo. "The future is dark," Papa Joachim says."I lost my job because of all this nonsense," Lobo says of communal violence in the gold-rich Ituri province, where he taught French and philosophy, speaking with a restraint and modesty characteristic of Congolese people in the face of suffering.

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