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World Bolivia awaits official election results, but the Socialist candidate is being congratulated

17:35  19 october  2020
17:35  19 october  2020 Source:   cnn.com

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Bolivians were voting in a repeat of the 2019 election after which Morales fled. An exit poll in Bolivia 's high stakes presidential election gave socialist candidate Luis Arce the Still cautioning that the results weren't yet official , Anez later congratulated Arce on his "apparent win" on Twitter.

Vote-counting has started Bolivia ’s in presidential and congressional elections with the socialist Since then, Bolivia has been run by an unelected transition government which Arce and his This may delay the publication of results . Salvador Romero, the head of the tribunal, told reporters that he

The official results of Bolivia's presidential elections are still to come, but the Socialist candidate Luis Arce is already getting congratulatory messages.

a hand holding a book: A man casts his vote during a voting simulation at a polling station, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in La Paz, Bolivia October 9, 2020. REUTERS/David Mercado © David Mercado/Reuters A man casts his vote during a voting simulation at a polling station, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in La Paz, Bolivia October 9, 2020. REUTERS/David Mercado

The country's interim President Jeanine Añez has said the results so far suggests Arce has won.

"We still don't have the official counting, but from the data we have, Mr. Arce and [vice-presidential candidate] Mr. [David] Choquehuanca have won the election. I congratulate the winners," Añez said on Twitter.

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The results are yet to be officially confirmed. Ex-president Morales declared that his party, the Movement for Socialism (MAS-IPSP), scored a Interim President Jeanine Anez also said that MAS candidates are poised to come first in the vote. “We still don’t have official results , but from the

A last-minute decision by Bolivia ’s electoral authority not to release fast-count results on Sunday night, citing issues with the system, has added a layer He toned down his words in a later statement. “It’s very important that all Bolivians wait calmly and that the election results be respected by

Arce, the frontrunner in the race, represents the Movement to Socialism, the party led by former President Evo Morales who is currently exiled in Argentina. Arce, whom Morales handpicked as his successor, has previously served as the country's finance minister.

His closest competitor was the centrist Carlos Mesa who leads Bolivia's Citizen Community party.

According to Bolivia's electoral rules, a candidate needs at least 40% of the votes to win, and a lead of 10% ahead of his opponent to win during the first round.

Bolivia has been badly hit by coronavirus. Añez herself contracted the virus, along with roughly a dozen members of her senior cabinet.

The economy is also struggling. Unemployment has spiked since the pandemic began, the International Monetary Fund is predicting a nearly 8% drop in GDP this year, and last month, US credit ratings agency Moody's downgraded Bolivia's standing.

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usr: 1
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