•   
  •   
  •   

World Canada condemns attacks in indigenous fishing dispute

21:50  19 october  2020
21:50  19 october  2020 Source:   reuters.com

No Chicago parade on Columbus Day amid pandemic concerns and controversy over explorer's legacy

  No Chicago parade on Columbus Day amid pandemic concerns and controversy over explorer's legacy CHICAGO - There will be a lot less fanfare on Columbus Day in Chicago this year. As criticism of Christopher Columbus' place in history has grown, clashes erupted over the removal of statues in his honor this summer and Chicago schools officially dropped his name from the holiday. Traditionally, Monday would be marked with a parade that celebrates Columbus' voyage to America and Italian American culture. However, the Joint Civic Committee of Italian Americans, facing a reckoning over Columbus’ legacy and concerns amid the COVID-19 pandemic, dropped plans for the parade.

The fishery is one way the Sipekne’katik community is hoping to combat poverty, by creating more jobs that pay a living wage in the lucrative lobster industry But the launch of the fishery sparked fierce opposition from non- Indigenous fishermen, who claim it’s illegal to harvest lobster during the current

The dispute has led to the removal of a section of fence that was erected by the private landowner. The disagreement has been ongoing for years — the property owners claim they Indigenous community members say their ancestors have been fishing here long before any settler decided to live in the area.

By Moira Warburton

a pile of rocks: FILE PHOTO: Fire Destroys Nova Scotia lobster pound in Middle West Pubnico © Reuters/JOHN MORRIS FILE PHOTO: Fire Destroys Nova Scotia lobster pound in Middle West Pubnico

TORONTO (Reuters) - Attacks against indigenous lobster fishermen over the weekend are "disgusting," a government minister said on Monday, as Ottawa provided more police resources to tamp down clashes over lobster fishing rights in eastern Canada.

a boat is docked next to a body of water: FILE PHOTO: Fishing boats from the Sipekne'katik band are seen tied up in Saulnierville © Reuters/TED PRITCHARD FILE PHOTO: Fishing boats from the Sipekne'katik band are seen tied up in Saulnierville

Tensions between local commercial fishermen and fishermen from the Mi'kmaq First Nation in the Atlantic province of Nova Scotia have been escalating in recent days in a conflict over indigenous fishing rights.

France Warns No Brexit Deal Better Than Bad One on Fisheries

  France Warns No Brexit Deal Better Than Bad One on Fisheries (Bloomberg) -- France is sharpening its tone on fishing rights, warning that while an agreement with the U.K. is an integral part of any post-Brexit trade accord, its proposals have fallen short. “The U.K. has made unacceptable proposals until now,” French Minister of the Sea Annick Girardin said in an interview published Sunday in the Journal du Dimanche newspaper. The nation’s fishermen “aren’t wrong” in saying they would prefer no deal to a bad one, she added.Her comments were backed up by Junior European Affairs Minister Clement Beaune, who said France wouldn’t cave and that an agreement is needed around the start of November.

Indigenous fishers in Canada are asserting their right to fish for a ‘moderate livelihood’ outside the regulated season. An Indigenous community leader in eastern Canada is renewing his call for concrete action from the federal government after a lobster pound in the province of Nova Scotia was

A fight over indigenous rights has erupted in Canada 's billion-dollar lobster fishing industry. A video of a dying indigenous woman being insulted by hospital staff is being widely condemned . Coronavirus: How one remote indigenous community in Canada is preparing. Video content.

Clashes over the weekend and earlier last week involved hundreds of people outside lobster pounds that handle indigenous-caught lobster.

"The acts of violence we have seen in the past days and weeks are disgusting, unacceptable, racist in nature," Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 1999 that the Mi'kmaq First Nation had the right to hunt and fish for a "moderate livelihood" in their traditional territory.

But the ruling left many grey areas - including the practical definition of "moderate livelihood" - leading Mi'kmaq fishermen to begin catching lobster outside the federally-mandated fishing season and raising the ire of local commercial lobster fishers.

Protests in support of both sides resulted in clashes last week that at times turned violent, with one person being arrested after attacking Chief Michael Sack of the Sipekne'atik First Nation. Meanwhile, the head of the province's fishing union resigned, citing concerns for his personal safety.

Indigenous Peoples' Day: Learn an indigenous or endangered language with this app

  Indigenous Peoples' Day: Learn an indigenous or endangered language with this app Transparent Language Online offers 17 indigenous and endangered language courses created by and for tribes and communities.To help protect these endangered languages, apps have been stepping up over the years. For example, Duolingo offers lessons in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian) and Diné (Navajo), and Drops offers Ainu, an indigenous Japanese language.

She said 63 Canadian lobster boats fish the grey zone, though none fish there exclusively. She believes a similar number of American boats fish " Canada and the United States have a long history of co-operation which ensures that fishing in this area is well-managed and safe for both countries."

A group of commercial non- Indigenous fishermen confront Indigenous lobster fishers at a Nova Scotia fishery , throwing rocks, destroying lobster and The scale of the fishery matters, Mr Steneck says, and the impact that a small fishery like the one organised by the Sipekne'katik First Nation would

A lobster pound where Indigenous fishermen stored their catch was set on fire, resulting in one person being admitted to a local hospital with life-threatening injuries, police said on Sunday.

On Sunday, Sack said the military needed to be brought in to keep the peace. Indigenous nations have a fraught relationship with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the force responsible for policing in much of rural Canada.

Federal Public Safety Minister Bill Blair pushed back on the suggestion on Monday, as he called for an end to the violence.

"This isn't a military operation, it is a peacekeeping operation," he said. "We have taken steps necessary to ensure that (the RCMP has) adequate resources to do the job."

(Reporting by Moira Warburton in Toronto; Editing by Tom Brown)

On the Navajo Nation, COVID-19 death toll is higher than any US state. Here's how you can support community relief. .
Native-led nonprofits are providing coronavirus relief for Indigenous communities nationwide.“Basic needs that most people take for granted, we desperately need on the reservation,” she said. “I’m trying to send as much as possible.

usr: 0
This is interesting!