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World Lagos at standstill as Nigeria protests spiral

21:51  19 october  2020
21:51  19 october  2020 Source:   msn.com

Nigeria's anti-police protesters storm prison, free inmates

  Nigeria's anti-police protesters storm prison, free inmates LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Nigeria's protests against police brutality turned violent Monday when a crowd stormed a prison and freed inmates in Benin City in southern Nigeria. Some prisoners jumped from a high fence of the institution while others were seen running away on the street, according to videos from the scene. Local media reports say as many as 200 prisoners may have escaped. Nigerian officials have not announced if there were casualties from the prison break.Protesters also attacked police stations and police trucks in other parts of the country.

Protesters clogged roads, bringing the centre of Lagos , the usually traffic-filled economic hub, to a standstill . Nigeria ’s authorities have set up a new special weapons and tactics (Swat) unit to replace Sars and pledged to hold officers who have committed abuses accountable.

Lagos , Nigeria (CNN) Protesters have taken to the streets in cities across Nigeria to demand urgent action to combat rape and sexual violence against women. In Lagos on Monday a coalition of rights groups marched to the state parliament calling for it to declare a state of emergency on rape and

Nigerian protesters paralysed Africa's biggest city Lagos on Monday, blocking the airport as widespread demonstrations sparked by police brutality spiralled.

a group of people holding a sign: There has been a huge outpouring of anger over brutality by Nigeria police's notorious Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) © PIUS UTOMI EKPEI There has been a huge outpouring of anger over brutality by Nigeria police's notorious Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS)

Footage seen by AFP showed hundreds of mainly young protesters waving flags and placards as they marched outside the international departures terminal in the economic hub.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: The demonstrations brought Nigeria's economic hub of Lagos to a standstill © PIUS UTOMI EKPEI The demonstrations brought Nigeria's economic hub of Lagos to a standstill

The wave of demonstrations began some 10 days ago when crowds took to the streets over abuses by the police's loathed Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS).

Joe Biden Urges Nigeria to End Attacks on Protesters Amid Calls for President Buhari to Resign

  Joe Biden Urges Nigeria to End Attacks on Protesters Amid Calls for President Buhari to Resign Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari is facing widespread calls to resign after several protesters were reportedly shot dead by the Nigerian military in the Lekki district of Lagos.In a statement, the former vice president called for the Nigerian government to "engage in a good-faith dialogue with civil society" and address "longstanding grievances" at the root of the #EndSars protests.

Lagos seems to be at a standstill as fewer motorists ventured to come out on Tuesday, while all businesses were closed, the News Agency of Nigeria NAN reports that the Fadeyi area of Ikorodu Road was on the boil as factional gangs of hoodlums have hijacked the protest on petrol subsidy

The normally congested streets of Lagos , Nigeria 's commercial centre, and the city of Ibadan were virtually deserted as shops and markets were closed and residents remained at home to show support for the pro -democracy movement and out of fear that the protests could spark violence.

The outpouring of anger forced the government to scrap the unit a week ago and promise reforms -- but protests have continued to swell as the young demonstrators demand more sweeping changes.

Reports of violence have begun to rise following a lull in bloodshed as officials promised to rein in the security forces after an initial harsh response from police.

Protesters climb a telecommunication mast while carrying the Nigerian national flag © Kola Sulaimon Protesters climb a telecommunication mast while carrying the Nigerian national flag

Amnesty International said five people had died since Friday, taking the overall number of fatalities to 15 since demonstrations started.

a group of people riding skis on a snowy road: Security forces fire tear gas at protesters in Abuja © Kola Sulaimon Security forces fire tear gas at protesters in Abuja

The rights group's Nigeria spokesman Isa Sanusi told AFP that one person died in the northern city of Kano on Monday while four others died in Benin City, Abuja and Osogbo over the weekend.

Nigeria unrest spreads after shooting of protesters

  Nigeria unrest spreads after shooting of protesters Buildings in Nigeria's main city of Lagos were torched on Wednesday and sporadic clashes erupted after the shooting of peaceful protesters in which Amnesty International said security forces had killed several people. Witnesses said gunmen opened fire on a crowd of over 1,000 people on Tuesday evening to disperse them after a curfew was imposed to end spiralling protests over police brutality and deep-rooted social grievances. "We were allWitnesses said gunmen opened fire on a crowd of over 1,000 people on Tuesday evening to disperse them after a curfew was imposed to end spiralling protests over police brutality and deep-rooted social grievances.

Lagos , Nigeria (CNN) At least 10 people have died in protests over police brutality in Nigeria , Amnesty International said Tuesday. The the human rights group told CNN police have used excessive force against unarmed protesters since the protests started last Thursday. "So far, Nigerian Police

Stranded protesters are chanting “I stand with Nigeria ”, as they approach blocked entrance route to villa. Lagos protest . Seyi Law said the government It’s been a peaceful protest so far, but vehicular traffic along the Ikorodu Road has ground to a standstill . The police CP has reentered his vehicle.

Amnesty on Wednesday reported 10 dead, including two policeman, and hundreds injured.

The protests in Lagos were peaceful on Monday but demonstrators cut roads across the sprawling megacity of 20 million.

An AFP journalist in the capital Abuja said security forces fired tear gas at protesters on Monday.

Around 50 youths in civilian clothes armed with machetes were seen chasing away demonstrators on a road leading to the presidential compound.

Police in southern Benin City said one of their facilities was attacked on Monday by "persons posing as #EndSARS protestors", leading the local governor to impose a 24-hour curfew.

a group of police officers riding horses on a city street: Nigerian police disperse protest with tear gas in Abuja © Okunyomih John Nigerian police disperse protest with tear gas in Abuja

"Reports indicate that the protesters carted away arms and ammunition from the armoury and freed the suspects in custody before setting some of the facilities ablaze," the force said on Twitter.

Nigeria protests: President calls for calm after protesters shot in Lagos

  Nigeria protests: President calls for calm after protesters shot in Lagos Nigeria's President Muhammadu Buhari has appealed for "understanding and calm" after protests against police brutality in Lagos turned bloody on Tuesday, with eyewitnesses telling CNN that multiple demonstrators had been shot dead by Army soldiers, who then took the bodies away. © Sunday Alamba/AP Protesters in Lagos on Tuesday. Following a night of violence which sparked global outrage, eyewitnesses say the city descended into chaos on Wednesday. Videos posted on social media and local television coverage showed a number of buildings on fire, including the Lagos Theater and at least one bank branch.

Arik Air New York bound passengers enraged after the airline failed to lift them Wednesday at the Murtala Muhammed Airport in Lagos , blaming aviation fuel

Protesters on Monday paralyzed commercial activities in Lagos State in support of President Muhammdu Buhari's decision to suspend Walter Onnoghen. A Nigerian newspaper and Online version of the Vanguard, a daily publication in Nigeria covering Nigeria news, Niger delta, general

A resident in the city said that several hundred people were protesting there on Monday.

"In my area a few hundred youth came out to protest," Kelvin Osagie, 29, told AFP.

"They were not chanting 'EndSARS' but 'End (President Muhammadu) Buhari'."

- Officials urge end -

The spread and scale of the demonstrations have rattled the government of President Buhari as they have snowballed into the largest show of people power in years.

The #EndSARS rallying cry has trended on social media and drawn support from high-profile celebrities in Nigeria and abroad.

Officials have urged an end to the demonstrations to give the authorities a chance to implement a promised overhaul of law enforcement.

"I am on the side of the young people out there. I understand your pain and I know your concerns are legitimate," Lagos governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu said on Twitter.

"I must reiterate that while we were able to immediately acquiesce to some of your demands, some will require time: we ask you to bear with us as we work on them."

The minister of youth and sports, Sunday Dare, said on Monday he had received fresh reassurances from Buhari.

"The president promised that he will ensure that the reforms as promised are met, that the reforms are long lasting and that the reforms will deliver for our country a police force that we will be proud of," he told reporters in Abuja.

Last week the head of Nigeria's police announced a new SWAT force would replace the disbanded SARS unit.

The police said the unit was set to begin training Monday but it faces huge scepticism from the crowds on the street who doubt it will bring real change.

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Hearings begin into killings of Nigerian protesters .
A week after the killing of activists protesting police brutality in Nigeria's largest city, a Lagos state government judicial panel began hearings into the violence on Tuesday. © Adetona Omokanye/Getty Images LAGOS, NIGERIA - OCTOBER 20: Demonstrators protest police brutality at the Lekki toll gate on October 20, 2020 in Lagos, Nigeria. The Nigerian government had imposed a 24-hour curfew to tamp down on sustained protests against the now-defunct Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), a police division accused of abuse, extortion and extra-judicial killings.

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