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World Mexico's president pushes back against U.S. lawmakers' energy policy complaints

01:50  25 october  2020
01:50  25 october  2020 Source:   reuters.com

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MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – More than 40 U . S . lawmakers have written a letter to President Donald Trump expressing concern that the Mexican government is threatening U . S . energy companies’ investments and market access, as well as undermining a regional trade deal.

More than 40 U . S . lawmakers have written a letter to President Donald Trump expressing concern that the Mexican government is threatening U . S . energy companies' investments and market access, as well as undermining a regional trade See how your 401(k) savings stacks up against your peers.

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Saturday pushed back against 43 U.S. lawmakers who this week complained in a letter to U.S. President Donald Trump that Mexico's energy policies were hurting U.S. companies.

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador standing in front of a building: FILE PHOTO: Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador waves during a meeting with relatives of the 65 miners who died during an explosion at Pasta de Conchos coal mine, in San Juan de Sabinas © Reuters/DANIEL BECERRIL FILE PHOTO: Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador waves during a meeting with relatives of the 65 miners who died during an explosion at Pasta de Conchos coal mine, in San Juan de Sabinas

Lopez Obrador has sought to bolster state-owned energy companies, especially oil giant Pemex, since assuming power on Dec. 2018. But industry figures say this has come at the expense of private companies and led to cancellation of contracts.

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A group of US lawmakers from energy producing states is urging the White House to call out Chet Thompson, president of refiner trade group American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, said US US investments represented 36% of Mexico ' s .9 billion in foreign direct investment last year.

For what it' s worth, Democratic presidential nominee pretty consistently won his final debate against President Trump, according to most reputable snap polls conducted after the Thursday night showdown Mexico ' s president pushes back against U . S . lawmakers ' energy policy complaints .

On Thursday, 43 lawmakers from both sides of Congress wrote to Trump saying Lopez Obrador's government is threatening U.S. energy companies' investments and market access, as well as undermining a regional trade deal.

Lopez Obrador, referring to the letter, said that in the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement there were two paragraphs that talk about Mexico's "absolute, sovereign right" to decide its energy policy.

"With much respect, in this matter, we have not signed any agreement with the government of the United States or Canada," Lopez Obrador said during a tour of northern Mexico.

Negotiated at the behest of Trump, the USMCA from July replaced the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Lopez Obrador's government has sought to roll back energy reforms put in place by his predecessor, Enrique Pena Nieto.

The leftist leader argues that past governments fronted by corrupt politicians skewed the Mexican energy market in favor of private interests at the expense of the public.

But private companies say the government's approach has seen it renege on contracts, with projects having to be frozen or cancelled even when they are near completion.

Energy companies believe their contracts were covered by pre-existing agreements and are preparing litigation against Mexico, according to lawyers and industry sources.

(Writing by Drazen Jorgic; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Trump appointee becomes leading climate problem solver .
Neil Chatterjee, a Kentucky Republican, used to be known as Mitch McConnell’s coal guy, eager to advance President Trump’s pro-fossil fuel agenda as chairman of an obscure but powerful regulatory agency. © Provided by Washington Examiner Wb.Energy.jpg Now, as he nears the potential end of his chairmanship of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Chatterjee is staking a claim as one of the government’s leading problem solvers on addressing climate change.

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