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World France faces boycott backlash after Macron defends freedom to print Mohammed cartoons

00:40  27 october  2020
00:40  27 october  2020 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Grisly beheading of teacher in terror attack rattles France

  Grisly beheading of teacher in terror attack rattles France PARIS (AP) — For the second time in three weeks, terror struck France, this time with the gruesome beheading of a history teacher in a street in a Paris suburb. The suspected attacker was shot and killed by police. French President Emmanuel Macron denounced what he called an “Islamist terrorist attack” and urged the nation to stand united against extremism. The teacher had discussed caricatures of Islam's Prophet Muhammad with his class, authorities said. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

France has urged Middle Eastern countries to end calls for a boycott of its goods in protest at President Emmanuel Macron 's defence of the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. The French foreign ministry said the "baseless" calls for a boycott were being "pushed by a radical

Calls are growing in parts of the Muslim world to boycott French goods in protest after President Emmanuel Macron publicly defended cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed , which are considered blasphemous in Islam.

French President Emmanuel Macron is facing backlash in some Muslim countries in response to remarks he made in support of free speech after a teacher was beheaded by an Islamist.

Emmanuel Macron wearing a suit and tie © Provided by Washington Examiner

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been the most prominent leader to call for a boycott on French products, which he did on Monday. The row began after Macron defended the right of his citizens to publish depictions of the Prophet Mohammed, an act that is forbidden in Islam.

“I am calling on the people, do not go near French goods, do not buy them,” Erdogan said in a speech, according to CNN. “European leaders must say 'stop' to Macron and his campaign of hatred.”

France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam

  France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam President Macron is introducing a new law in December that would give France powers to monitor and regulate mosques and Muslim communities.Samuel Paty, 47, was decapitated in northwestern Paris on October 16 after showing his class inflammatory cartoons that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. His killer, who has been identified as Chechen refugee Abdoulakh Anzorov, was shot dead by police at the scene. On Wednesday, French prosecutors charged seven people with participating in a terror attack.

France has called on Arab nations to end "baseless" calls for a boycott of its goods - after French President Emmanuel Macron 's defence of the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. The French foreign ministry also urged authorities in the countries to speak out against such protests in

France has called the boycott of its products by several countries in the Middle East “baseless” Macron has drawn further anger from some Muslims for backing the publishing of caricatures of the So what is behind the boycott of French products and the backlash against Macron ’s comments on

French teacher Samuel Paty was decapitated earlier this month by Chechen Abdullakh Anzorov, 18, who was later killed by police. Prosecutors said Anzorov was angry that Paty showed his students a Mohammad cartoon. Mass demonstrations in support of free speech broke out in France following Paty’s killing.

Police have been conducting sweeping raids in connection to the decapitation in an effort to root out other radical Islamist networks across the country, which is home to Western Europe’s largest Muslim population.

Macron vowed in the aftermath of Paty’s killing that his country, which is noted for its secular government and free speech, “will not give up cartoons” following his death.

Over the weekend, Erdogan asserted that the French president needs “mental treatment” and on Monday compared the treatment of Muslims in Europe to the Jewish people prior to the Holocaust, according to Agence France-Presse.

Morocco officially condemns the publication of cartoons of Muhammad and calls on France

 Morocco officially condemns the publication of cartoons of Muhammad and calls on France © Copyright 2020, L'Obs Morocco joins the list of countries denouncing the continued publication in France of cartoons of the prophet Muhammad: Rabat “condemns vigorously ", in an press release of the Moroccan Minister of Foreign Affairs published Sunday, October 25, the" outrageous caricatures of Islam and the prophet ". # MAEC press release: The #Morocco ?? Strongly condemns the continuation of the publication of outrageous cartoons ... https://t.co/6Y5POkNkYp —MarocDiplomatie (@Maroc Diploma

French President Emmanuel Macron has vigorously defended such depictions as protected by the right to free speech. On Twitter, some criticized what they said is France ’s hypocrisy and bias against Muslims. One cartoon widely shared put forth the argument that caricatures of Muslims are defended

Muslims in France have been told they are “not persecuted,” after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan The French Council of the Muslim Faith (CFCM) sought to remind Muslims of their freedom in The French president had warned that the country would not “not give up the cartoons ” and said

“You are in a real sense fascists. You are in a real sense the links in the chain of Nazism,” Erdogan said.

The pushback over Macron’s defense of Mohammed cartoons is not only being felt in Turkey, but other countries including Jordan, Pakistan, Egypt, and Iran.

"We condemn publication of satirical cartoons depicting Prophet Mohammed,” Jordanian Foreign Minister Ayman Al-Safadi tweeted over the weekend.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan also attacked Macron’s response over Twitter and said his defense of the cartoons could lead to increased radicalization.

“Hallmark of a leader is he unites human beings, as Mandela did, rather than dividing them. This is a time when Pres Macron could have put healing touch & denied space to extremists rather than creating further polarisation & marginalisation that inevitably leads to radicalization,” Khan said in a lengthy chain of tweets.

Boycott of French products: Bruno Le Maire denounces "unacceptable" threats

 Boycott of French products: Bruno Le Maire denounces He affirmed that the government would support companies facing boycott threats © Jacques Witt / SIPA Boycott of French products: threats DIPLOMACY - He has affirmed that the government would support companies in the face of threats of boycott "Boycott practices are unacceptable", denounced the Minister of Economy Bruno Le Maire on Monday in the Assembly while several countries in the Middle East and in Turkey called to shun French products, after Emmanuel Macron's intervention on the publicatio

Macron ’s office denounces ‘rudeness’ after Turkish president calls for counterpart to have ‘mental check’. Erdogan’s remarks are the latest sign of a growing backlash in the Islamic world, including calls for a boycott of French goods, sparked by Macron ’s claim that Islam is in crisis.

The backlash over French President Emmanuel Macron ’s critique of Islam has intensified after Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan questioned his counterpart’s mental health, while Muslims in several countries are demanding a boycott of France .

“It is unfortunate that he has chosen to encourage Islamophobia by attacking Islam rather than the terrorists who carry out violence, be it Muslims, White Supremacists or Nazi ideologists. Sadly, President Macron has chosen to deliberately provoke Muslims, incl his own citizens,” he added.

Meanwhile, France has been met with boycott threats from private businesses in the Middle East. In Kuwait, a retail and grocery chain said that more than 50 of its stores would join a boycott. In Jordan, some supermarkets now feature signs noting that they no longer sell French goods, according to CNN. A supermarket chain in Qatar has announced similar moves.

Despite the backlash, Macron has remained defiant.

“We will not give in, ever,” he tweeted on Sunday. “We respect all differences in a spirit of peace. We do not accept hate speech and defend reasonable debate. We will always be on the side of human dignity and universal values.”

Macron has also garnered support from the leaders of other Western European countries. German Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman Steffen Seibert blasted Erdogan’s remarks.

France warns citizens to be cautious as anger seethes in Muslim world over cartoons

  France warns citizens to be cautious as anger seethes in Muslim world over cartoons France warns citizens to be cautious as anger seethes in Muslim world over cartoonsIn a sign that some countries want to limit the fallout, Saudi Arabia condemned the cartoons but held back from echoing calls by other Muslim states for a boycott of French products or other actions.

Macron after all had tackled the debate about Islamist extremism before Paty’s death in his speech There were also balancing passages about the state as guarantor of the freedom of religion In Syria Macron objects to the Turkish attacks on the Kurdish YPG militia, France ’s allies in the war against Isis.

France 's largest employers' federation on Monday urged companies to 'resist the blackmail' over a product boycott by Arab countries as a backlash widens over Paris's hardened stance against radical Islam.

“They are defamatory comments that are completely unacceptable, particularly against the backdrop of the horrific murder of the French teacher Samuel Paty by an Islamist fanatic,” Seibert said, according to Agence France-Presse.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said that his country stands with France and condemned Erdogan for leading calls for a boycott.

“President Erdogan’s words addressing President [Macron] are unacceptable. The Netherlands stands firmly with France and for the collective values of the European Union. For the freedom of speech and against extremism and radicalism,” Rutte said.

The Washington Examiner reached out to the State Department for comment but did not immediately receive a response.

Tags: News, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Emmanuel Macron, France, Turkey, Boycotts, Islam, Islamism, Muslims

Original Author: Zachary Halaschak

Original Location: France faces boycott backlash after Macron defends freedom to print Mohammed cartoons

Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impact .
Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impactPARIS/ANKARA (Reuters) - Slights and barbs have marred relations between France's Emmanuel Macron and Turkey's Tayyip Erdogan for years, but the row over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad has dragged them to a new low which could have more lasting consequences.

usr: 3
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