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World Charlie Hebdo, whose cartoons sparked terror attacks in France, published a cutting caricature of Turkish President Erdogan amid his feud with Macron

13:30  28 october  2020
13:30  28 october  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com

The Beheading of a Teacher in France Exposes a Cultural Schism That Threatens President Macron's Future

  The Beheading of a Teacher in France Exposes a Cultural Schism That Threatens President Macron's Future The killing of Samuel Paty threatens to shift the national conversation to the turf of the country’s resurgent far-right . “This is the beginning of the grand maneuvre around the next elections,” says Emmanuel Rivière, CEO of the public division of the Kantar polling agency in France. The French leader is not well-suited to the current battle, he says; Macron faces a tough reelection contest in April 2022, for a second five-year term. “Macron is identified with the economy, with liberalism, with his international reputation,” he says. “He is not identified with crime and terrorism.

Ankara has accused Charlie Hebdo of promoting hatred after the French satirical magazine published a front-page caricature of President Recep Tayyip The cartoon shows the Turkish leader lounging in his underwear with a can of beer in his hand as he lifts up the skirt of a woman wearing a hijab

Charlie Hebdo published the cartoon amid tensions between France and Turkey. Turkey today condemned a Charlie Hebdo cartoon showing its president Recep Tayyip Erdogan An attack on Charlie Hebdo by jihadists in 2015 left 12 people dead, including some of its most famed cartoonists.

a close up of a book: The October 28, 2020, cover of Charlie Hebdo, showing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Charlie Hebdo © Charlie Hebdo The October 28, 2020, cover of Charlie Hebdo, showing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Charlie Hebdo
  • The French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Wednesday published a caricature of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan amid his tensions with French President Emmanuel Macron.
  • The cartoon depicts Erdogan sitting in his underwear, drinking a beer, and lifting up a woman's hijab to expose her bare backside. Most Muslims consider drinking alcohol haram, or forbidden.
  • Erdogan has vocally condemned Macron's recent attacks on Islam, saying on Saturday the French president "needs a mental check."
  • On October 2, Macron had announced a law to monitor and regulate France's Islamic communities. Support for the law strengthened after the October 16 killing of a teacher who showed his class cartoons mocking the Prophet Muhammad.
  • Charlie Hebdo's inflammatory cartoons that mocked the Prophet has prompted several terror attacks in recent years.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Wednesday published a searing caricature of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, amid high tensions between him and French President Emmanuel Macron.

France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam

  France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam President Macron is introducing a new law in December that would give France powers to monitor and regulate mosques and Muslim communities.Samuel Paty, 47, was decapitated in northwestern Paris on October 16 after showing his class inflammatory cartoons that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. His killer, who has been identified as Chechen refugee Abdoulakh Anzorov, was shot dead by police at the scene. On Wednesday, French prosecutors charged seven people with participating in a terror attack.

Charlie Hebdo just published a series of so-called cartoons full of despicable images purportedly of our President ." The front-page caricature of He brought a case in 2016 against German TV comic Jan Boehmermann, who read out a deliberately defamatory poem about the Turkish leader during

"French President Macron 's anti-Muslim agenda is bearing fruit! Charlie Hebdo just published a series of The front-page caricature of Wednesday's edition of Charlie Hebdo An attack on Charlie Hebdo by jihadists in 2015 left 12 people dead, including some of its most famed cartoonists.

On Saturday, Erdogan said Macron needed a "mental check" following a series of comments from the French president where he criticized Islam and said it needed regulation in France.

In response, Paris recalled its ambassador from Ankara on Sunday, with Erdogan joining a call for Islamic nations to boycott French products on Monday.

Charlie Hebdo, whose 2015 cartoons mocking the Prophet Muhammad had inspired several terror attacks, weighed in on Wednesday.

The cartoon depicts Erdogan sitting in his t-shirt and underwear, drinking a beer, and lifting up a woman's hijab to expose her bare backside.

Drinking alcohol is considered haram, or forbidden, by most Muslims, and Erdogan has long condemned it.

Macron vs. Erdogan is a fight both leaders want

  Macron vs. Erdogan is a fight both leaders want “In each other,” the French and Turkish leaders “have found the ideal enemy.” They may be NATO allies, but there’s no love lost between French President Emmanuel Macron and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Over the past year, they have conspicuously locked horns on a number of fronts, from Libya’s civil war to the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan to tense maritime disputes in the eastern Mediterranean. But their latest spat marks perhaps the most acute escalation yet.

— Charlie Hebdo (@ Charlie _ Hebdo _) October 27, 2020. Tensions have risen between France and Erdogan has called on Turkish citizens to boycott French goods after Macron pledged to step up efforts Charlie Hebdo has previously published cartoons depicting the prophet Mohammad.

Anti- terror prosecutors are investigating. French President Emmanuel Macron visited the scene, calling the killing an "Islamist terrorist attack ". Reacting to Friday's attack , Charlie Hebdo tweeted: "Intolerance just reached a new threshold and seems to stop at nothing to impose terror in our country."

"Ouuuh! The Prophet!" the speech bubble from Erdogan's mouth read, suggesting that Erdogan is only pretending to be a staunch defender of Islam.

The headline published alongside the cartoon reads: "Erdogan: In private, he is very funny!"

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Emmanuel Macron are posing for a picture: Erdogan and French President Emmanuel Macron in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 27, 2020. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images © Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images Erdogan and French President Emmanuel Macron in Istanbul, Turkey, on October 27, 2020. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Turkish officials slammed the cartoon on social media.

"You cannot deceive anyone by hiding behind freedom of opinion! I condemn the immoral publication of the inexcusable French rag about our President," Fuat Oktay, the vice president, tweeted.

Turkey's communications director, Fahrettin Altun, tweeted: "We condemn this most disgusting effort by this publication to spread its cultural racism and hatred."

Ibrahim Kalin, Erdogan's spokesman, tweeted: "We strongly condemn the publication of the French magazine, which has no respect for any faith, sacred and value, about our President."

"Charlie Hebdo" shows Erdogan caricature

 In the dispute over freedom of expression between France and Turkey, the French satirical magazine "Charlie Hebdo" has now reloaded. The Turkish head of state looks from the front page of the Wednesday edition. Ankara is raging. © picture-alliance / dpa / Turkish Presidency The Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is angry The drawing has the title: "Erdogan: In private he is very funny" and shows the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a T-shirt and Underpants drinking a can of beer.

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo has published a cartoon of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on the cover of Wednesday's issue. This announcement and the cover photo were posted on Twitter on Tuesday. The cartoon is published amid the current escalation of the diplomatic conflict

of the caricatures , which originally appeared in France in Charlie Hebdo , sparking a terrorist attack on the satirical newspaper in 2015 that killed 12 people. While condemning “all acts of terror in the name of religion” it attacked the “continued publication of blasphemous cartoons ” of the prophet.

Macron has not publicly commented on Wednesday's caricature.

A memorial for Charlie Hebdo editor Stephane Charbonnier and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Bernard Verlhac, and Jean Cabut, on the Place de la Republique in Paris on January 8, 2015, shortly after a terror attack on the magazine's office. MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images © MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images A memorial for Charlie Hebdo editor Stephane Charbonnier and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Bernard Verlhac, and Jean Cabut, on the Place de la Republique in Paris on January 8, 2015, shortly after a terror attack on the magazine's office. MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

On October 2, Macron called Islam "a religion in crisis all over the world" and announced a new law which would see his government monitor how mosques and Islamic communities are funded, as well as train clerics in France.

The law gained new relevance on October 16, when Samuel Paty, a teacher, was decapitated in northern Paris after showing his class the 2015 Charlie Hebdo cartoon that mocked the Prophet Muhammad.

Creating or proliferating images of God or the Prophet is not permissible in Islam and is considered blasphemous.

The attacks prompted by the Charlie Hebdo cartoons have seen Macron spend the last three years criticizing Islamic separatism in France and outlining his plan to eradicate home-grown extremism.

Charlie Hebdo caricature Erdogan, Ankara wants a "judicial and diplomatic" response

 Charlie Hebdo caricature Erdogan, Ankara wants a © Adem ALTAN / AFP In a new Charlie Hebdo drawing, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is shown lifting a woman's jilbab. Turkey has condemned this cartoon and claims to want to bring "a judicial response" to this affair, adding a step to the escalation of tensions with France since the assassination of Samuel Paty. "We will not give up caricatures, drawings," Emmanuel Macron solemnly declared during the national tribute to Professor Samuel Paty, who was murdered by a terrorist.

" Charlie Hebdo just published a series of so-called cartoons full of despicable images purportedly of our President . We condemn this most disgusting effort by this publication to spread its cultural racism and hatred," he said on Twitter. "The so-called caricatures are loathsome and they are devoid of any

Cartoons caricaturing the prophet of Islam have a dark and intensely political legacy in France . media captionRallies in Paris, Toulouse, Lyon and other French cities in In 2015, 12 people were killed in an attack on the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo , which had published the cartoons .

At a memorial service for Paty last week, Macron defended Charlie Hebdo, saying the country "will not give up our cartoons."

Read the original article on Business Insider

Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impact .
Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impactPARIS/ANKARA (Reuters) - Slights and barbs have marred relations between France's Emmanuel Macron and Turkey's Tayyip Erdogan for years, but the row over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad has dragged them to a new low which could have more lasting consequences.

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