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World Killings in France trigger Bangladesh protests against Macron

13:10  30 october  2020
13:10  30 october  2020 Source:   reuters.com

Samuel Paty: Secular France finds itself at a crossroads after attack on teacher

  Samuel Paty: Secular France finds itself at a crossroads after attack on teacher France was irrevocably changed by the Paris terror attacks of January 2015. Three days of violence began with a massacre at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, which had previously published controversial cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed. They ended with a siege at a kosher supermarket. Seventeen people were killed and long-simmering tensions over secularism, Islamism and religious equality erupted into public view. Anti-immigration rhetoric targeting France's Muslim communities also became increasingly common. Since then, these divides have only worsened with further attacks and the subsequent fallout.

Tens of thousands of Muslims protested in Bangladesh on Friday after killings by a Tunisian migrant in a French church prompted a vow by President Emmanuel Macron to hold his ground against attacks on his country's values and freedom of belief. France , home to Europe's largest Muslim community

Macron has refused to apologize for the cartoons, as many in the Islamic world have demanded, instead announcing France would not yield “At the rally, the party’s emir Pir Syed Mohammad Rezaul Karim of Charmonai demanded the government adopt a motion of condemnation against France in

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Tens of thousands of Muslims protested in Bangladesh on Friday after killings by a Tunisian migrant in a French church prompted a vow by President Emmanuel Macron to hold his ground against attacks on his country's values and freedom of belief.

a group of people standing in front of a building: Supporters and activists of the Islami Oikya Jote take part in a protest in Dhaka © Reuters/MOHAMMAD PONIR HOSSAIN Supporters and activists of the Islami Oikya Jote take part in a protest in Dhaka

France, home to Europe's largest Muslim community, was engaged in a war against Islamist ideology and more militant attacks were likely, interior minister Gerald Damarnin warned.

Protesters marching through the streets of Dhaka, the capital of Muslim-majority Bangladesh, chanted "Boycott French products" and carried banners calling Macron "the world’s biggest terrorist".

Opinions | Instead of fighting systemic racism, France wants to ‘reform Islam’

  Opinions | Instead of fighting systemic racism, France wants to ‘reform Islam’ Another terrorist attack has intensified anti-Muslim sentiment. When a terrorist in the Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine beheaded Samuel Paty, a middle school teacher who’d shown his students caricatures of the prophet Muhammad, he was transformed from an educator into a national symbol. Paty is the latest of more than 260 French killed in similar attacks since 2012. As with Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old priest whose throat was slashed by Muslim fundamentalists in 2016 in a small stone church in the village of Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, Paty’s killing was portrayed as an attack on the soul of France.

The backlash against Emmanuel Macron following his insistence that publication of caricatures of In France , Macron ’s centrist government is facing criticism over its response to Paty’s killing by There have been calls from several Islamic countries to boycott French goods and protests across the

Protesters chanted "Boycott French products" and called for President Macron to be punished. Demonstrations took place throughout France after Mr Paty's killing . Bangladesh and France enjoy a good and warm bilateral relationship - the European country is a major destination of Bangladeshi

"Macron is leading Islamophobia," said demonstrator Akramul Haq. "He doesn't know the power of Islam. The Muslim world will not let this go in vain. We'll rise and stand in solidarity against him."

France raised its security alert to the highest level on Thursday after a knife-wielding man shouting "Allahu akbar" (God is Greatest) beheaded a woman in a church and killed two more people before being shot and taken away by police.

"We will not give any ground," Macron said outside the church in the city of Nice, vowing to deploy thousands more soldiers to guard sites such as places of worship and schools.

France had been attacked "over our values, for our taste for freedom, for the ability on our soil to have freedom of belief", he added.

France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam

  France pulled its ambassador from Turkey, and Arab states are boycotting French products, after Macron said he wanted to regulate Islam President Macron is introducing a new law in December that would give France powers to monitor and regulate mosques and Muslim communities.Samuel Paty, 47, was decapitated in northwestern Paris on October 16 after showing his class inflammatory cartoons that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. His killer, who has been identified as Chechen refugee Abdoulakh Anzorov, was shot dead by police at the scene. On Wednesday, French prosecutors charged seven people with participating in a terror attack.

After Macron promised France would not “renounce the caricatures”, a furious riposte that emerged on Friday on social media under Arabic On Sunday, after protests in which the president’s picture was burned and Erdoğan, suggested his French counterpart needed “his mental health tested ”, Macron

Protests grow across Muslim world against French president Emmanuel Macron – video report. Even to less fiery observers in Bangladesh , Macron ’s defence of the right to caricature Islam’s Iran on Tuesday summoned France ’s top diplomat in the country to protest Macron ’s “ anti -Islam stances”

A judicial source in France said a 47-year-old man had been taken into custody on Thursday evening on suspicion of having been in contact with the perpetrator of the attack.

The violence has come at a time of growing Muslim anger over France's defence of the right to publish cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammad, and protesters have denounced France in street rallies in several Muslim-majority countries.

Several leaders in Asia expressed support for France after the attacks on Thursday, the birthday of the prophet.

"It is just the most callous and cowardly and vicious act of barbarism by terrorists and should be condemned in the strongest possible way," said Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Morrison had expressed his support to Macron, he told media on Friday.

"We share values. We stand for the same things," he said.

Morrison also condemned as absurd comments by former Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad that Muslims had a right to be angry and kill "millions of French people for the massacres of the past".

Macron vs. Erdogan is a fight both leaders want

  Macron vs. Erdogan is a fight both leaders want “In each other,” the French and Turkish leaders “have found the ideal enemy.” They may be NATO allies, but there’s no love lost between French President Emmanuel Macron and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Over the past year, they have conspicuously locked horns on a number of fronts, from Libya’s civil war to the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan to tense maritime disputes in the eastern Mediterranean. But their latest spat marks perhaps the most acute escalation yet.

Macron also made reference on Thursday to the killing in 2016 of Father Jacques Hamel, a Catholic priest whose throat was cut by two men inside his Normandy church. The national anti -terrorist prosecutor said an investigation had been opened into “ killings linked to a terrorist organisation”.

Meanwhile, small anti -French protests were held in Libya, Gaza and northern Syria, where Turkish-backed militias exert control. Earlier this month, before the teacher's killing , Mr Macron had already announced plans for tougher laws to tackle what he called "Islamist separatism" in France .

"Freedom of expression is a right, calling for violence is not," the U.S. ambassador to Malaysia, Kamala Shirin Lakhdhir, said on Twitter in response to Mahathir's comments.

Mahathir said his comments were taken out of context, while a senior Malaysian government figure, Abdul Hadi Awang, said Macron's comments could not be justified.

"The French president’s statement exposes his hostility against Islam and its followers," said Abdul Hadi, a leader of the Malaysian Islamist party PAS.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi also voiced support for Macron's position and condemned the violence.

"I strongly condemn the recent terrorist attacks in France," Modi said on Twitter on Thursday. "India stands with France in the fight against terrorism."

Thursday's attack came less than two weeks after a middle-school teacher in a Paris suburb was beheaded by an 18-year-old assailant who was apparently incensed that the teacher had shown a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad in class.

France has suffered a string of Islamist militant attacks, from bombings and shootings in 2015 in Paris that killed 130 people to a 2016 attack in Nice that killed 86 when a militant drove a truck through a seafront crowd celebrating Bastille Day.

(Reporting by Ruma Paul in Dhaka, Sanjeev Miglani in New Delhi, Rozanna Latiff in Kuala Lumpur and John Mair in Sydney; Writing by Clarence Fernandez; Editing by Robert Birsel)

Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impact .
Analysis: Bad blood - why France-Turkey cartoon row could leave lasting impactPARIS/ANKARA (Reuters) - Slights and barbs have marred relations between France's Emmanuel Macron and Turkey's Tayyip Erdogan for years, but the row over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad has dragged them to a new low which could have more lasting consequences.

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