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World Australia defense chief pledges changes after damning Afghanistan report

05:25  22 november  2020
05:25  22 november  2020 Source:   reuters.com

Australian special forces "unlawfully killed" 39 Afghan civilians

  Australian special forces Military chief says "patrols took the law into their own hands, rules were broken, stories concocted, lies told and prisoners killed," and the troops must face justice. A years-long internal investigation into military misconduct was released Thursday, prompting the Chief of the Australian Defence Force to admit a "destructive" culture of impunity among special forces leading to a string of alleged murders and cover-ups spanning years.

ADF Chief Angus Campbell has released the findings of a long-awaited report into allegations of war crimes carried out by Australian soldiers in Afghanistan . Today, the Australian Defence Force is rightly held to account for allegations of grave misconduct by some members of our special forces

Allegations of unlawful killings by Australian troops in Afghanistan , described as “possibly the most disgraceful episode in Australia ’s military history,” sent shockwaves across the country. Chief of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) General Angus Campbell delivers the findings from the

By Lidia Kelly

a group of people jumping in the air: Members of Australia's special forces conduct an exercise during the Australian International Airshow in Melbourne © Reuters/Mick Tsikas Members of Australia's special forces conduct an exercise during the Australian International Airshow in Melbourne

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia's top military official said on Sunday the country's defense force must 'own' a recent report on soldiers committing crimes in Afghanistan and pledged changes to ensure that atrocities do not happen again.

The report, published on Thursday after an inquiry into the conduct of special forces personnel in Afghanistan between 2005 and 2016, found that senior commandos forced junior soldiers to kill defenseless captives in order to "blood" them for combat..

The Taliban is on the offensive. Keeping the militants at bay: U.S. airstrikes, even as bases close and troops leave.

  The Taliban is on the offensive. Keeping the militants at bay: U.S. airstrikes, even as bases close and troops leave. Afghan officials fear the reduced troop numbers and base closures could mean less U.S. support in future battles against an emboldened Taliban. [As Trump’s term nears close, administration announces troop level cuts in Afghanistan and Iraq] The U.S. airstrikes were “the only reason the Taliban was pushed back,” said Lt. Col. Niaz Mahmad Majahad, the national police commander in Arghandab whose forces fought the Taliban until the military arrived. “If it weren’t for the airstrikes, the Taliban would not have fallen.

Australia ’s defense minister, Linda Reynolds, has said she felt “physically ill” after reading the I got the report two weeks ago and it made me physically ill. The defense minister’s condemnation of the On Thursday, Chief of the Defense Force Angus John Campbell described the findings as a serious

Canberra, Australia (CNN) Australian elite forces allegedly killed 39 Afghans civilians and prisoners unlawfully in an environment where "blood lust" and "competition killings" were reportedly a norm, according to a long-awaited official report . Speaking Thursday, chief of the Australian Defense

Defense Force Chief General Angus Campbell said on Sunday he would be held to account to ensure the report was dealt with thoroughly, as well as for duty and performance as the commander in the Middle East in 2011.

"I want the ADF (Australia Defense Force) to acknowledge that this is something we've got to own because if we don't own it, we won't fix it and if we don't fix it, this horror may appear again and I just cannot accept that," Campbell told ABC television.

The report, which recommended referring 19 current and former soldiers for potential prosecution, caused shame and anger in Australia, a country that usually honours its military history with fervour.

"I see layers of responsibility here," Campbell said. "I'm determined to see deep, comprehensive and enduring change where it is needed."

(Reporting by Lidia Kelly; editing by Richard Pullin)

Chris Jones made a business decision and just avoided tackling Tony Pollard .
The Vikings lost to the Cowboys, 31-28, on Sunday.Jones’ Minnesota Vikings were leading the Cowboys 21-16 in the fourth quarter. Dallas had a 2nd-and-4 at the Minnesota 42 and handed the ball off to Tony Pollard, who broke a long touchdown run.

usr: 1
This is interesting!