•   
  •   
  •   

World Spain’s mortuary workers endure the daily march of death

10:40  24 november  2020
10:40  24 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

Family of Quawan 'Bobby' Charles marches as Louisiana teen's death investigated as homicide

  Family of Quawan 'Bobby' Charles marches as Louisiana teen's death investigated as homicide The family of Quawan "Bobby" Charles and other community members took to the streets to demand transparency into the teen's disappearance anAbout 100 people gathered Saturday afternoon at the Baldwin Police Department, which hasn't been used since the inside was burned in 2018, calling for justice for Bobby. They then marched a half mile to the town's City Hall, where the police department is now located.

Spain is the worst hit European nation after Italy with 40,000 cases – 5,400 of them health workers . The coronavirus death toll in Spain has jumped by 514 in a single day, as the Mortuaries , as well as hospitals, are overwhelmed. Though the daily tally of dead has worsened remorselessly, there might

Spain tightens coronavirus lockdown by ordering ALL non-essential workers to stay indoors as death toll soared Spain is tightening its coronavirus lockdown by ordering all non-essential workers to stay indoors. The married dad-of-two started to feel unwell on March 8 and thought he had common flu.

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — When Marina Gómez and her fellow mortuary worker enter a room at a nursing home to remove the body of a COVID-19 victim, they work methodically and in silence.

Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, mortuary workers prepare the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 before removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, mortuary workers prepare the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 before removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) A mortuary worker transports the body of a COVID-19 victim on a stretcher at the morgue of a hospital in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press A mortuary worker transports the body of a COVID-19 victim on a stretcher at the morgue of a hospital in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

They disinfect the mouth, nose and eyes to reduce the risk of contamination. They wrap the body in the bed sheets. Two white body bags are used, one inside the other, and the zippers are closed in the opposite direction: the first bag is sealed head to foot; the second, foot to head.

Pfizer to seek approval from FDA 'within days' after further analysis finds COVID-19 vaccine 95% effective

  Pfizer to seek approval from FDA 'within days' after further analysis finds COVID-19 vaccine 95% effective Pfizer and BioNTech are expected to produce up to 50 million doses globally in 2020 and up to 1.3 billion doses by the end of 2021. The news comes days after Moderna, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based biotechnology company, announced early Monday its candidate vaccine, mRNA-1273, developed in collaboration with the U.S. government, appeared to be 94.5% effective against COVID-19.

Spain sees its highest number of coronavirus deaths in a day - 769 - as country' s toll of fatalities rises by nearly a fifth to 4,858, but infection rate falls. Health ministry in Madrid said the number of deaths had reached 4,858 on Friday, an increase of 769. It comes after the death toll jumped by 655 on

Spain reports deadliest day while seeking to tighten lockdown. U.K. should keep lockdown maybe until early June, adviser says. With the goal of “flattening the curve” at stake, Italy’s Giuseppe Conte and Spain ’ s Pedro Sanchez took to the national airwaves with comments that raised the level of unease.

A person sleeps in a bed a few feet away from a body sealed in bags on the floor of a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press A person sleeps in a bed a few feet away from a body sealed in bags on the floor of a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

The only sound in the room is from the whisper of the zippers, sealing the dead from view for the last time.

Gómez and her colleagues work for Mémora, the leading funeral service provider in Barcelona with homes throughout Spain and Portugal. They are part of a group of essential workers. Like nurses and doctors, they have seen and touched the march of death from the virus that has already killed some 1.4 million people around the world.

When arriving at a nursing home or rehabilitation center, Gómez and her partner Manel Rivera encourage caregivers to move a surviving roommate from the room while they collect the body.

Pfizer, Moderna have delivered 'best news so far' in COVID-19 fight, but USA TODAY's vaccine panel warns of logistical challenges

  Pfizer, Moderna have delivered 'best news so far' in COVID-19 fight, but USA TODAY's vaccine panel warns of logistical challenges Expert panel pushes USA TODAY's COVID vaccine clock ahead on positive candidate news but logistic challenges loom getting doses into Americans' arms.Normally restrained and cautious, a panel of experts convened by USA TODAY could barely contain its enthusiasm over the latest effectiveness figures from both Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech, whose vaccine candidates have been shown to be about 95% effective, while not raising any serious safety concerns.

Spain has announced a four-phase plan to lift its stringent coronavirus lockdown and return to a "new normality" by the end of June. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said each region would relax restrictions at a different pace, depending on the severity of its outbreak.

Squaddies in Spain tasked with disinfecting OAP care homes as part of the fight against coronavirus are discovering abandoned bodies. Covid-19 victims have reportedly been found co-habiting with loved ones who are still alive.

Many times, however, only a white curtain separates the living from the dead, and that harsh reality and lack of decency bothers Gómez.

Mortuary workers pick up the body of a COVID-19 victim from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Mortuary workers pick up the body of a COVID-19 victim from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

“Just the simple fact of going to pick up a body and seeing there is another person, alive, next to them (in the room), that is what most gets to me,” she told The Associated Press.

In the first months of the pandemic last spring, Gómez said their requests to move a surviving patient out of the room were honored more often. A sort of wartime atmosphere had brought people together in solidarity amid the misery.

Plagued by COVID outbreaks, the meatpacking industry could be forced to change under Biden

  Plagued by COVID outbreaks, the meatpacking industry could be forced to change under Biden President-elect Joe Biden could direct his agencies to implement and enforce strict safety measures to protect worker health, experts said.Biden, who takes office Jan. 20, won the U.S. presidential election on a campaign promise to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The spread took hold in meatpacking plants this spring and since has infected more than 42,000 workers and killed at least 221 people. The Trump administration, meanwhile, weakened safety guidelines and signed an executive order to keep plants open at the request of industry officials, even as outbreaks ravaged the plants.

German citizens could be confined to their homes from Monday if people do not act responsibly.

Spain also reported 523 new deaths , down from yesterday' s 567, taking the total from 18,056 to 18 The daily number of deaths was 523 today, slightly down from yesterday' s 567 and well down from Two workers at the Torrero cemetery in Zaragoza wear protective suits as they tape up the coffin of a

Now, however, Gómez said many Spaniards seem to have become numbed by the resurgence of the virus after a summer reprieve that led authorities to claim the worst was over. Now, the country has over 1.5 million cases and has recorded over 43,000 deaths.

The body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 is covered with a sheet on a bed in a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. Like doctors and nurses, mortuary workers are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press The body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 is covered with a sheet on a bed in a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. Like doctors and nurses, mortuary workers are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Some emotional detachment is needed in order to keep working, admits Rivera, 44.

“Once I put the person in the shroud and close the zipper, I no longer ask myself if she had blond, red or brown hair,” he said.

Any dwelling on the dead means “you don’t last long in this job,” Rivera said.

After successfully bringing the daily death count down from over 900 in March to single digits by July, Spain has seen a steady uptick that brought deaths back to over 200 a day this month. With that relapse, the body collectors have returned to making the rounds of hospitals, homes and care facilities.

COVID-19 means Thanksgiving alone for many Americans

  COVID-19 means Thanksgiving alone for many Americans As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread, many will skip the big feast and spend Thanksgiving alone to protect themselves and their families.Her mother is a cardiology nurse, her sister works at a nursing home and Broderick has been teaching in-person classes as an assistant biology professor at Thiel College in Greenville, Pennsylvania. Since all of them interact with people outside of their immediate families each day, exposing them to COVID-19, Broderick said she will stay home.

Mortuary workers Marina Gómez and Manel Rivera store the body of a person who died of COVID-19 at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. Gómez and her fellow mortuary workers form part of Spain's rarely seen front line in the fight against COVID-19. Like doctors and nurses, they are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Mortuary workers Marina Gómez and Manel Rivera store the body of a person who died of COVID-19 at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. Gómez and her fellow mortuary workers form part of Spain's rarely seen front line in the fight against COVID-19. Like doctors and nurses, they are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

“We should have learned something,” Gómez said. “But once we were left to do what we want, we went back to our natural state. We have no memory.”

Gómez, 28, was hired to fill in for another worker on sick leave in April, when Spain was reeling from the worst of the virus. Thrown into the nonstop runs to collect the dead, she had to learn on the fly how to do this difficult job safely.

Before, if someone had died of an infectious disease, they would wear gloves, mask and an apron. When the virus hit Spain in March, they quickly learned to put on individual protection suits and two sets of gloves, and how take it all off properly when finished so they didn’t get infected.

Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, funeral home workers remove the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 at a nursing home while another resident sleeps in his bed in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday Nov. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, funeral home workers remove the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 at a nursing home while another resident sleeps in his bed in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday Nov. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

So far, they have remained healthy.

Spain's foreign minister visits Senegal to discuss migration

  Spain's foreign minister visits Senegal to discuss migration DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Spain’s foreign minister met Sunday with Senegal's president in the West African country’s capital Sunday to discuss the sudden increase of Senegalese migrants attempting to reach the Canary Islands by boat. Spanish Foreign Minister Arancha González Laya met with President Macky Sall in Dakar to discuss migration and border cooperation between Spain, the European Union and Senegal. The country has become a major point of migrant departures even though it is around 950 miles (1,500 kilometers) away.

When the death toll skyrocketed in March and April, Rivera decided to isolate himself for six weeks, only seeing his 5-year-old son via video.

Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, mortuary workers move the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 from an elevator after removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Wearing protective suits to prevent infection, mortuary workers move the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 from an elevator after removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

“It was the feeling that you wanted to do everything as quickly as possible, to reduce the contact as much as you could, but at the same time, you couldn’t make a mistake,” Rivera said of those days. “We were risking our lives.”

Mortuary workers carry the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 after removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Mortuary workers carry the body of an elderly person who died of COVID-19 after removing it from a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Román Ibáñez, 38, has transported bodies for 14 years. He recalled this year's darkest weeks, when the company went from picking up 50 corpses a day to nearly 200.

Mortuary worker Marina Gómez handles the body of a person who died of COVID-19 at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Monday, Nov. 16, 2020. Gómez and her fellow mortuary workers form part of Spain's rarely seen front line in the fight against COVID-19. Like doctors and nurses, they are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Mortuary worker Marina Gómez handles the body of a person who died of COVID-19 at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Monday, Nov. 16, 2020. Gómez and her fellow mortuary workers form part of Spain's rarely seen front line in the fight against COVID-19. Like doctors and nurses, they are part of a group of essential workers who see and touch the daily march of death amid the worst public health crisis in over a century. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

“It was completely insane. You reached the point that you didn’t know what you were doing. You never took off your suit. It was chaotic,” he said.

A New Spain Is Emerging That Drives Conservative Opponents Crazy

  A New Spain Is Emerging That Drives Conservative Opponents Crazy Pedro Sanchez’s budget deal will shore up the foundations of his minority government and offer the chance of some political stability in Spain after five years of division and paralysis. © Bloomberg A closed retail store in Sant Jaume Square in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020. The Spanish central bank forecasts that the economy could shrink as much as 12.6% this year. The prospect has left his right-wing opponents furious.

A mortuary worker closes a coffin with body of a COVID-19 victim at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press A mortuary worker closes a coffin with body of a COVID-19 victim at Mémora morgue in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

The most harrowing moment for Ibáñez was the night they responded to a nursing home.

Relatives of a person who died of COVID-19 react during a funeral at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press Relatives of a person who died of COVID-19 react during a funeral at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

“A young woman opened the door, crying. Half the staff was sick, the person on the night shift had left a dead body where it was. She was trying to get someone else to come work, but there was no one. Half the residents had died. From when we entered until when we left, she did not stop crying,” he said.

A mortuary worker prepares the coffin carrying the body of a person who died of COVID-19 before being cremated during a funeral at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press A mortuary worker prepares the coffin carrying the body of a person who died of COVID-19 before being cremated during a funeral at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Picking up bodies is not highly skilled labor, and many of the mortuary workers previously have toiled at factories, construction sites and delivery jobs. But it does require true mettle — a combination of empathy and respect, balanced with the pride of doing what has to be done.

The workers say they love their job because it gives them purpose and satisfaction.

“It truly is a tough job, but it has its recompense,” said Jonathan Ciudad, Ibáñez’s partner. “With a sense of humanity and sticking together, you get through it. You truly see that life is for living.”

A mortuary worker collects the ashes of a COVID-19 victim from an oven after the remains where cremated at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) © Provided by Associated Press A mortuary worker collects the ashes of a COVID-19 victim from an oven after the remains where cremated at Mémora mortuary in Girona, Spain, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

—-

Associated Press writer Joseph Wilson contributed.

___

Follow AP’s coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Turkey's new virus figures confirm experts' worst fears .
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — When Turkey changed the way it reports daily COVID-19 infections, it confirmed what medical groups and opposition parties have long suspected — that the country is faced with an alarming surge of cases that is fast exhausting the Turkish health system. In an about-face, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government this week resumed reporting all positive coronavirus tests — not just the number of patients being treated for symptoms — pushing the number of daily cases to above 30,000. With the new data, the country jumped from being one of the least-affected countries in Europe to one of the worst-hit.

usr: 2
This is interesting!