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World Refugees from Ethiopia conflict scratch a living in Sudan

13:55  27 november  2020
13:55  27 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

Escalating conflict could threaten Ethiopia's economic success story

  Escalating conflict could threaten Ethiopia's economic success story Ethiopia is teetering on the brink of civil war as fighting intensifies in the north of the country, sparking fears that its economic transformation could be stymied by protracted conflict. Federal government forces loyal to Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed are making advances in the semi-autonomous northern Tigray region, which is currently controlled by the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF). The TPLF led a coalition which ruled Ethiopia for almost three decades prior to Abiy taking office in 2018.

An Ethiopian refugee and her child collect mats at a transit site in Hamdayet, Sudan . Amid the ongoing conflict in Ethiopia , our concern for the 100,000 Eritrean refugees is growing. Without humanitarian access, there is great concern about the delivery of the most basic services including

Ethiopia has been praised for its open door policy to refugees feeling war-torn South Sudan . But with no signs of the conflict ending, concerns are growing Read more: Stuck in limbo in Ethiopia , Africa's biggest refugee camp. Young mother Nyjawech Ruey has been living in the camp with her children

Ten-year-old Samarwat Tkhal fled fighting in Ethiopia's Tigray region this month -- now she sells food to survive, among tens of thousands of fellow refugees building a new life in neighbouring Sudan.

a man holding a sign: Ethiopian children selling mini cakes in © ASHRAF SHAZLY Ethiopian children selling mini cakes in "Village Eight" -- an east Sudan transit settlement that has grown into the size of a small town with the refugee influx a group of people sitting at a beach: Fish, eggs and bread on sale by Ethiopian refugees to their peers © ASHRAF SHAZLY Fish, eggs and bread on sale by Ethiopian refugees to their peers

Tkhal, wearing a red T-shirt and yellow trousers, wanders the dusty streets of "Village Eight", a transit point just across the border into Sudan that has rapidly swelled into the size of a small town.

Peace was swift in Ethiopia under Abiy. War was, too.

  Peace was swift in Ethiopia under Abiy. War was, too. NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Abiy Ahmed left Ethiopians breathless when he became the prime minister in 2018, introducing a wave of political reforms in the long-repressive country and announcing a shocking peace with enemy Eritrea. The young prime minister was cheered as he toured Ethiopia in his feverish first days, including when he visited the powerful Tigray region, whose leaders had dominated the national ruling coalition for decades. The international community, dazzled, showered Abiy with praise. Not even two years after taking power, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec.

NAIROBI (Reuters) - Thousands of Ethiopian refugees were fleeing into neighbouring Sudan on Wednesday as federal troops continued to battle local United Nations sources told Reuters the Tigray conflict had already sent 6,000-7,000 people fleeing across the border into Sudan , with Khartoum

Ethiopian refugees head to Sudan as Tigray crisis escalates. Speaking to Reuters in the Sudanese border town of Hamdayat, refugees gave accounts of the escalating conflict in Tigray state, where Government Refugees from the Tigray region of Ethiopia wait to register with the UN in Sudan .

a person sitting on a counter: An Ethiopian refugee who fled the fighting in Tigray sells tea in Village 8 in Gedaref State, eastern Sudan © ASHRAF SHAZLY An Ethiopian refugee who fled the fighting in Tigray sells tea in Village 8 in Gedaref State, eastern Sudan

It is the first stop for many of the Ethiopians fleeing their homeland.

Tkhal holds up a box of chocolate cakes, as she shyly approaches potential customers.

"My father gives me a box of 50 cakes every morning that I sell," she said. "I work from morning to night."

Over 43,000 refugees have crossed into Sudan since fighting broke out in Tigray on November 4, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi said Friday, as he visited Sudanese camps crammed with those fleeing the conflict in northern Ethiopia.

Ethiopian refugees who had savings quickly bulk-bought food and other goods that they can sell after fleeing into Sudan © ASHRAF SHAZLY Ethiopian refugees who had savings quickly bulk-bought food and other goods that they can sell after fleeing into Sudan

While praising Sudan for upholding its "traditional hospitality to people in need", Grandi warned that the host country also "urgently requires international assistance to support its efforts."

Ethiopia's Tigray: These refugees fled a town littered with corpses. They join tens of thousands making the journey to Sudan

  Ethiopia's Tigray: These refugees fled a town littered with corpses. They join tens of thousands making the journey to Sudan Thousands have made the journey from the Tigray region in Ethiopia to neighboring Sudan where they have been met with a shortage of food, beds and shelter. The UN described Tigray as a humanitarian crisis which will only escalate in the coming weeks. A town 'covered with corpses'Another survivor, Gashaw Maleda, said four of his friends escaped, but another 15 were killed. Tigrayan militias came with machetes and knives, looking for people from the Amhara region to kill, he said. © Marwan Ali/AP At least 30,000 refugees have fled to neigboring Sudan, according to the UN. "I hated being human at the time.

Wounded, traumatized refugees tell of bloody conflict in Ethiopia . Tens of thousands of refugees have made their way to eastern Sudan from Ethiopia 's restive Tigray province. Sky News' John Sparks encountered hundreds of them near the border town of Hamdayet.Nov.

Thousands of Ethiopian refugees were fleeing into neighbouring Sudan on Wednesday as federal troops continued to battle local forces in the closedoff northern United Nations sources told Reuters the Tigray conflict had already sent 6,000-7,000 people fleeing across the border into Sudan , with

- Heavy fighting -

Hundreds have been killed in fighting between the federal government of Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and dissident forces of the regional ruling party, the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF).

Maps of Ethiopia and the region of Tigray. © Robin BJALON Maps of Ethiopia and the region of Tigray.

On Friday, Abiy is due to meet African Union envoys to discuss the worsening conflict, after he ordered the army to launch a final offensive against Tigrayan forces.

But while conflict rages at home, many of the refugees in Sudan are already eking out a living in their new surrounds.

Taray Burhano, 32, walks the streets selling cigarettes -- one-by-one, not by the pack.


Gallery: Ethiopian refugees flee country to avoid fighting in Tigray province (USA TODAY)

a person sitting in a tree: A member of the Amhara Special Forces keeps guard at the 5th Battalion of the Northern Command of the Ethiopian Army in Dansha, Ethiopia, on Nov. 25, 2020.

"I'm not making a fortune," said Burhano, who, like many, escaped with only what he could carry for the hard trek across the baking hot bush.

Ethiopia warns civilians of 'no mercy' in Tigray offensive

  Ethiopia warns civilians of 'no mercy' in Tigray offensive NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Ethiopia’s military is warning civilians in the besieged Tigray regional capital that there will be “no mercy” if they don’t “save themselves” before a final offensive to flush out defiant regional leaders — a threat that Human Rights Watch on Sunday said could violate international law. “From now on, the fighting will be a tank battle,” spokesman Col. Dejene Tsegaye said late Saturday, asserting that the army was marching on the Tigray capital, Mekele, and would encircle it with tanks. “Our people in Mekele should be notified that they should protect themselves from heavy artillery.

International pressure mounted Tuesday on Ethiopia ’s warring parties to cease fighting and protect civilians in Tigray. The fighting has already driven more than 40,000 people into Sudan . The fighting has already driven more than 40,000 people into Sudan . FRANCE 24's Bastien Renouil reports.

International pressure mounted Tuesday on Ethiopia ’s warring parties to cease fighting and protect civilians in Tigray. The fighting has already driven more than 40,000 people into Sudan . The fighting has already driven more than 40,000 people into Sudan . FRANCE 24's Bastien Renouil reports.

"But at least I don't sit around and think about what happened to us."

Once a sleepy settlement, Village Eight is now a busy centre.

- Entrepreneurs -

Chekhi Barra, 27, sits on the ground waiting for clients.

"Until a solution to the fighting is found, something has to be done," he said, adding that while aid is trickling in, people need more than what is provided.

Barra fled with his wife and son from their home in the town of Mai-Kadara, where Ethiopia's rights watchdog this week said at least 600 civilians were massacred.

Using the little cash he took with him, Barra invested in a box of 100 bars of soap, a basic necessity that he knows will generate a profit when sold individually.

"I sell them for twice as much as I bought them," he said.

Despite losing their homes and businesses, the new Ethiopian arrivals to Sudan are not wasting their time.

Sylvia Tahai immediately resumed her work -- selling coffee.

"As soon as I arrived, I went to buy coffee, cups, sugar and a coffee-maker", the 23-year-old said, as customers crowded around her traditional Ethiopian flask brewing on a charcoal brazier.

Buhano Amha, 28, has built a stall where he sells tomatoes and onions.

"I get my supplies three times a day, because the goods sell quickly," he said.

Even small restaurants and bars are opening up -- built from any materials people can find.

Taklay Manott, 49, said he ran the biggest restaurant in the Ethiopian town of Humera before he fled.

In Sudan, he has hammered together a small cafe, with wooden planks for walls and a thatch grass roof for shade from the blazing sun.

"I lost everything," said Mannot, who borrowed money from a Sudanese businessman to set up his new cafe.

The restaurant is a basic shack, with six chairs and two tables, and he no longer has a complex menu.

The only dishes on offer are fuul -- the staple Sudanese dish of fava beans -- and eggs.

But amid the gloom, Mannot is looking to the future -- and he has no plans to go home.

"I will not return to Humera," he said. "I have nothing more to do there."

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Ethiopians fleeing conflict bring Sudan refugee camp back to life .
The Um Raquba refugee camp in eastern Sudan once housed Ethiopians fleeing famine, but now life has flooded back into the isolated camp as refugees seek safe haven from the Tigray conflict. The rapidly growing Um Raquba refugee camp, located some 80 kilometres (50 miles) from the border, once housed refugees who fled Ethiopia's 1983-85 famine that killed more than a million people. © ASHRAF SHAZLY Um Raquba is Sudan's only official refugee settlement It was closed 20 years ago but reopened for a second time earlier this month.

usr: 1
This is interesting!