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World Protests over security bill take place across France

17:15  28 november  2020
17:15  28 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

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Tensions rising amid protest against ‘Global Security ’ bill in Paris. The protesters threw bottles and other objects at riot police, an RT France correspondent reported Videos of police using excessive force against demonstrators and criminal suspects have recently caused a vast public outcry in France .

Protests over police brutality have already taken place elsewhere in country ahead of Saturday. In the southern city of Toulouse demonstrators took to the streets on Friday evening brandishing placards with slogans like "police everywhere, justice nowhere". In western Nantes police said around 3,500

PARIS (AP) — Thousands of critics of a proposed security law that would restrict sharing images of police officers in France gathered across the country in protest Saturday, while Paris officers were advised to behave responsibly during the demonstrations in the wake of footage showing police using violence becoming public.

Demonstrator holds a poster reading © Provided by Associated Press Demonstrator holds a poster reading "I write your name, Freedom", during a demonstration Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Lille, northern France. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Dozens of rallies against a provision of the law that would make it a crime to publish photos or video of on-duty police officers with the intent of harming their “physical or psychological integrity.” Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished.

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A protest rally in Nantes, which saw crowds denouncing a proposed national security law, has been dispersed by French police. The discontent against the bill was further fueled this week by the publication of a brutal video showing officers beating up and racially abusing music producer Michel

Protests over police brutality have already taken place elsewhere in country ahead of Saturday. In the southern city of Toulouse demonstrators took to the streets on Friday evening brandishing placards with slogans like "police everywhere, justice nowhere". In western Nantes police said around 3,500

Assa Traore, center, sister of Adama Traore attends a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Adama Traore was Black man killed in police custody, whose case has mobilized broad anger against police brutality and racial injustice. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. The cause has gained fresh impetus in recent days after footage emerged of French police officers beating up a Black man, triggering a nationwide outcry. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) © Provided by Associated Press Assa Traore, center, sister of Adama Traore attends a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Adama Traore was Black man killed in police custody, whose case has mobilized broad anger against police brutality and racial injustice. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. The cause has gained fresh impetus in recent days after footage emerged of French police officers beating up a Black man, triggering a nationwide outcry. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

In Paris, several thousand people packed the sprawling Republique plaza and surrounding streets carrying red union flags, French tricolor flags and homemade signs denouncing police violence, demanding media freedom or calling for Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin’s resignation.

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There were violent clashes across France as thousands took to the streets in protest against a controversial proposed all-encompassing “global security law” which would criminalize filming police activity in certain circumstances. The proposed legislation, currently being debated by the French

Protests over police brutality have already taken place elsewhere in country ahead of Saturday. In the southern city of Toulouse demonstrators took to the streets on Friday evening brandishing placards with slogans like "police everywhere, justice nowhere". In western Nantes police said around 3,500

The crowd included journalists, journalism students, left-wing activists, migrants rights groups and citizens of varied political stripes expressing anger over what they perceive as a hardening police tactics in recent years, especially since France's yellow vest protest movement against economic hardship in 2018.

A protester shouts during a demonstration security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) © Provided by Associated Press A protester shouts during a demonstration security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Many protesters, police and journalists have been injured during protests in recent years, including several Associated Press journalists.

Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence

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“There were all those protests in the summer against police violence, and this law shows the government didn’t hear us... It’s the impunity. That’s what makes us so angry," protest participant Kenza Berkane, 26, said.

Berkane, who is French and of North African origin, described being repeatedly stopped by police for identity checks in the metro or while going to school. while white friends were allowed to pass. “We ask ourselves when will this stop?”

The cause has gained renewed importance in recent days after footage emerged of French police officers beating up a Black man, triggering a nationwide outcry.

French President Emmanuel Macron spoke out against the video images on Friday, saying “they shame us.”

Video that surfaced Thursday showed the beating, days earlier, of music producer Michel Zecler, following footage of the brutal police evacuation Tuesday of migrants in a Paris plaza. The officers involved in the beating of Zecler were suspended pending an internal police investigation.

Demonstrator holds a poster reading © Provided by Associated Press Demonstrator holds a poster reading " All monitored except the police, stop global security" during a demonstration Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Lille, northern France. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

An internal letter from Paris Police Prefect Didier Lallement called on officers to use “probity, the sense of honor and ethics” when policing the protests, which were authorized by authorities. An Associated Press reporter at the Paris protest saw police hanging back on side streets.

France protests spread over proposed security law

  France protests spread over proposed security law Demonstrations are taking place across France against the country's proposed "global security" law and its flagship measure, which plans to restrict the filming of police officers. They came as calls to withdraw it were exacerbated by cases of police violence this week.

Protester hold a banner reading © Provided by Associated Press Protester hold a banner reading "For our freedom" and showing a defaced portrait of Paris police prefect Didier Lallement during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Thousands of critics of a proposed French security law that would restrict sharing images of police have gathered across the country Saturday in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. The cause has gained fresh impetus in recent days after footage emerged of French police officers beating up a Black man, triggering a nationwide outcry. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Article 24 of the proposed security law criminalizes the publishing of images of police officers with the intent of causing harm. Anyone found guilty could be sentenced to up to a year in jail, and fined 45,000 euros ($53,000).

While journalists have been the most outspoken over the security bill, it could have an even greater impact on the efforts of non-journalists who film police during aggressive arrests, notably minorities who can try to fight police abuse and discrimination with a few seconds of cellphone video.

Demonstrators across France protest proposed security law

  Demonstrators across France protest proposed security law Protests roiled France on Saturday as more than 133,000 people demonstrated against a security law that would restrict photographs of police officers from being published. © Provided by Washington Examiner Critics say the law would make it more difficult for journalists and human rights advocates to hold police accountable, according to CNN, especially after a video was published showing police officers beating Michel Zecler, a black music producer, in what AFP called "racial abuse." France has faced something of a reckoning following the death of George Floyd in the United States.

A demonstrator talks with French police officers and shows a poster reading © Provided by Associated Press A demonstrator talks with French police officers and shows a poster reading "Inspectorate General of the National Police, 378 cases 2 convictions, it's starting to show", during a demonstration Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Lille, northern France. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Protesters calling for the article to be withdrawn say it goes against their democracy’s “fundamental public freedoms.”

Agathe Le Gall, a 26-year-old job seeker, said the proposal “is like the beginning of the end” because she fears laws will get tougher and tougher.

“All those videos we see online, we know that behind those incidents there are thousands more that aren’t recorded," Agathe said Saturday. “I am lucky I am white because I am not targeted” by police.

A protester holds a poster during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) © Provided by Associated Press A protester holds a poster during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. Critics of a proposed French security law in France that would restrict sharing images of police are gathering across the country in protest. Civil liberties groups and journalists are concerned that the measure will stymie press freedoms and allow police brutality to go undiscovered and unpunished. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Prime Minister Jean Castex announced Friday that he would appoint a commission to redraft Article 24, but he backtracked after hearing from angry lawmakers. The commission is now expected to make new proposals by early next year on the relationship between the media and police.

French police face charges over black man's beating

  French police face charges over black man's beating Four French police officers should face charges over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer, Paris's top prosecutor said on Sunday, days after the incident that intensified controversy over a new security law. © Alain JOCARD The protests in Paris saw a brasserie set alight, cars torched and stones thrown at security forces, who responded with tear gas and anti-riot tactics The beating of music producer Michel Zecler -- exposed in video footage published last week -- has become a focus of anger against the police, who critics accuse of institutionalised racism and targeting black and Arab people.

Macron’s liberal double standards .
Protests over freedom of speech in France come at a time when President Emmanuel Macron and his allies have been vigorously posturing over France’s liberal values. The French president was angered by outside criticism of domestic politics, particularly in the English-language press, that placed emphasis on the alienation of some ethnic minority communities in the country. Some French commentators insisted that Anglo-American observers were both downplaying the scale of the security threat within the country and imposing their societies’ views on identity in a context where such views don’t necessarily translate.

usr: 3
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