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World French police face charges over black man's beating

07:25  30 november  2020
07:25  30 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

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Four French police on Sunday risked being charged over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer that shocked France and They could face a fast-track trial or a more standard procedure which would see a case being opened and the men appear before an investigating

Four French police on Sunday risked being charged over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer that shocked France and intensified Tens of thousands protested across France Saturday against the security bill -- which would restrict the right of the press to publish the faces of

Four French police officers should face charges over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer, Paris's top prosecutor said on Sunday, days after the incident that intensified controversy over a new security law.

a person that is on fire: The protests in Paris saw a brasserie set alight, cars torched and stones thrown at security forces, who responded with tear gas and anti-riot tactics © Alain JOCARD The protests in Paris saw a brasserie set alight, cars torched and stones thrown at security forces, who responded with tear gas and anti-riot tactics

The beating of music producer Michel Zecler -- exposed in video footage published last week -- has become a focus of anger against the police, who critics accuse of institutionalised racism and targeting black and Arab people.

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Four French police on Sunday risked being charged over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer that shocked France and intensified Tens of thousands protested across France Saturday against the security bill -- which would restrict the right of the press to publish the faces of

Paris' s top prosecutor has called for four police officers under investigation over the beating of a black music producer to face charges and for three Music producer Michel Zecler speaks to media before going to the Inspectorate General of the National Police , known by its French acronym IGPN, in Paris

a group of people walking down the street: Several fires erupted after clashes between protesters and police on Saturday © Alain JOCARD Several fires erupted after clashes between protesters and police on Saturday

Tens of thousands protested on Saturday against the security bill, which would restrict the right to publish images of on-duty police. The rally in Paris ended in bitter clashes.

Paris prosecutor Remy Heitz said all four police investigated over the beating of Zecler should face charges and called for three of them to be held in custody and be charged specifically with using racial abuse.

a group of people in a helmet: Among those hurt was an award-winning Syrian photojournalist, Ameer al-Halbi, 24, who has worked for AFP © Gabrielle Cézard Among those hurt was an award-winning Syrian photojournalist, Ameer al-Halbi, 24, who has worked for AFP

The case is now being handed to an investigating magistrate who will have the final say on charges and detention measures.

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PARIS— French prosecutors said they are pressing preliminary assault charges against four police officers allegedly involved in the beating of a Black music producer, requesting that three of the officers remain in jail. The officers were detained last week after officials reviewed footage from a security

Four French police on Sunday risked being charged over the beating and racial abuse of a black music producer that shocked France and intensified The beating of music producer Michel Zecler -- exposed in video footage published last week -- has become a rallying cause for anger against the

- 'Aleppo came back to me' -

The protests in Paris saw a brasserie set alight, cars torched and stones thrown at security forces, who responded with tear gas and anti-riot tactics.

Among those hurt was an award-winning Syrian photojournalist, Ameer al-Halbi, 24, seen with a bruised face and much of his head covered in bandages in AFP photos.

Al-Halbi is a freelance photographer who has worked for Polka Magazine and AFP, who both condemned the incident in statements Sunday.

"We are shocked by the injuries suffered by our colleague Ameer al-Halbi and condemn the unprovoked violence," said Phil Chetwynd, AFP’s global news director, demanding that the police investigate the incident.

a crowd of people in a dark room: Rallies in Paris against the security bill ended in violence © Alain JOCARD Rallies in Paris against the security bill ended in violence

Al-Halbi was trapped for several hours with head wounds unable to get to hospital and said the experience brought back memories of the Syrian civil war in his hometown Aleppo.

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The police officers were suspended and detained by the National Police Inspectorate General after a video appeared to show them beating black music producer Michel Zecler. The officers faced a judge on Sunday, according to a source cited by AFP. This followed violent clashes on Saturday, as

A Black man beaten up by several French police officers said he is seeking justice after the publication of videos showing officers Footage shows victim, who was later released without charge , being punched, kicked and hit with truncheon. Alleged police beating of Black man angers French .

a crowd of people standing in front of a store: IMAGES A Bank of France building and a newsstand are on fire in Place de la Bastille, Paris, as thousands take to the streets across France to demand the government abandon a contentious new security law. © Myriam ADAM IMAGES A Bank of France building and a newsstand are on fire in Place de la Bastille, Paris, as thousands take to the streets across France to demand the government abandon a contentious new security law.

"It was Aleppo that came back to me last night," he said.

Police said 81 people were arrested at the protests, with Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin saying the violence was "unacceptable".

In a tweet, Darmanin said 98 police officers had been hurt during the protests, adding: "Those behind the violence will be pursued."

- Racial abuse charges -

The four officers have been questioned by the police's National Police Inspectorate General (IGPN) on suspicion of using violence and racial abuse.

Heitz said three of the officers should remain in custody "to avoid the perpetrators communicating or pressure on witnesses".

He called for charges of intentional violence, racial abuse and posting a false police report.

The fourth man, who arrived on the scene later and fired a tear gas canister, should be freed under conditions and charged with intentional violence, he said.

Protests over security bill take place across France

  Protests over security bill take place across France PARIS (AP) — Thousands of critics of a proposed security law that would restrict sharing images of police officers in France gathered across the country in protest Saturday, while Paris officers were advised to behave responsibly during the demonstrations in the wake of footage showing police using violence becoming public. Dozens of rallies against a provision of the law that would make it a crime to publish photos or video of on-duty police officers with the intent of harming their “physical or psychological integrity.

The four officers had a good service record before the incident, he said, and claimed they had acted "out of fear".

Zecler had been stopped for not wearing a mask and because of a strong smell of cannabis. But only a tiny quantity of the substance was found, he said.

- Law controversy -

Commentators say that the images of the beating -- first published by the Loopsider news site -- may never have been made public if the contentious Article 24 of the security legislation was made law.

The bill would criminalise publishing images of on-duty police with the intent of harming their "physical or psychological integrity".

It was passed by the National Assembly although it is awaiting Senate approval.

The controversy over the law and police violence is developing into another crisis for the government as President Emmanuel Macron confronts the pandemic, its economic fallout and a host of problems on the international stage.

Macron said on Friday that the images of Zecler's beating "shame us" and asked the French government to come up with proposals to "fight against discrimination".

For critics, the legislation is further evidence of a slide to the right by Macron, who came to power in 2017 as a centrist promising liberal reform of France.

But the proposed legislation is being called increasingly into question.

"Frankly, I am not closed to anything," said Yael Braun-Pivet, a member of Macron's ruling party who chairs the parliamentary committee on legal affairs.

"We have had times where we have modified or even removed articles," he told France Inter radio.

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usr: 1
This is interesting!