•   
  •   
  •   

World Who can (and can’t) travel under the new travel ban

20:52  29 june  2017
20:52  29 june  2017 Source:   usatoday.com

Supreme Court could reveal action on travel ban at any time

  Supreme Court could reveal action on travel ban at any time The Supreme Court has almost certainly decided what to do about President Donald Trump's travel ban affecting citizens of six mostly Muslim countries. The country is waiting for the court to make its decision public about the biggest legal controversy in the first five months of Trump's presidency. The issue has been tied up in the courts since Trump's original order in January sparked widespread protests just days after he took office.

President Trump's first travel ban targeting majority-Muslim countries in January unleashed chaos around the world, as foreigners were stopped from boarding flights Here's who will be allowed in and who will be barred: Visitors admitted. Legal permanent residents (green card holders) of the U.S.

How is the US travel ban being extended? As of Saturday morning, the US had already suspended travel for 30 days from 26 Schengen countries - 22 The White House is now conducting temperature checks on anyone who is in close contact with the president and Mr Pence. Cost had been a concern

Abdullah Alghazali, right, hugs his 13-year-old son Ali Abdullah Alghazali after the Yemeni boy stepped out of an arrival entrance at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on Feb. 5, 2017. U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers will be key players in putting President Trump's revised travel ban into effect on June 29, affecting visitors from six mostly Muslim countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.© Alexander F. Yuan, AP Abdullah Alghazali, right, hugs his 13-year-old son Ali Abdullah Alghazali after the Yemeni boy stepped out of an arrival entrance at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on Feb. 5, 2017. U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers will be key players in putting President Trump's revised travel ban into effect on June 29, affecting visitors from six mostly Muslim countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

President Trump's first travel ban targeting majority Muslim countries in January unleashed chaos around the world as foreigners were stopped from boarding flights overseas and detained or deported after reaching U.S. airports.

What the Supreme Court’s travel ban ruling means

  What the Supreme Court’s travel ban ruling means The Supreme Court’s decision to allow portions of President Trump’s travel ban to take effect is a win for the administration — but the impact will be far less severe than Trump’s first iteration of the measure.The Supreme Court’s decision to allow portions of President Trump’s travel ban to take effect is a win for the administration — but the impact will be far less severe than Trump’s first iteration of the measure.

Passengers at Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport in Abuja, Nigeria.Credit Ashley Gilbertson for The New York Times.

As a result of the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic, many countries and regions have imposed quarantines, entry bans , or other restrictions for citizens of or recent travellers to the most affected

That broad ban was quickly halted by federal courts. But at 8 p.m. ET Thursday, a scaled-down version goes into effect with the blessing of the Supreme Court.

Immigration experts expect fewer disruptions because far fewer travelers will be affected: those from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen without close ties to the United States.

Here's who will be allowed in and who will be barred:

Visitors admitted

  • Legal permanent residents (green card holders) of the U.S.
  • Already approved for a short-term visa.
  • Already approved for refugee status.
  • Have a close relative living in the U.S. That includes a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling, according to a State Department cable obtained by the Associated Press.
  • Have a standing job offer from a U.S. company.
  • Are students accepted by a U.S. university.

Visitors barred

  • Lack what the Supreme said is a "bona fide relationship" with a U.S. person or entity.
  • Have relatives in the U.S. who aren't "close" enough, such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, and fiancees.
  • First-time tourists.

Read more:

How Trump's travel ban evolved .
The version of Trump’s travel ban that finally went into effect is a far cry from the administration’s original vision.It's been a long and bumpy road for the controversial policy, which has been bogged down by legal challenges, revised by government lawyers and further narrowed by the Supreme Court.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!