•   
  •   
  •   

World WHO Warns on Vaccine; Thailand Migrant Cluster: Virus Update

06:21  26 january  2021
06:21  26 january  2021 Source:   bloomberg.com

Tipsters, tech-savvy kids, pharmacy hopping: How Americans are landing coronavirus vaccines

  Tipsters, tech-savvy kids, pharmacy hopping: How Americans are landing coronavirus vaccines People are spending hours refreshing websites and creating tiny intelligence networks to try to get vaccinated. ‘It feels like I’m trying to get a Beyoncé ticket,' one woman said. The Safeway in her Washington, D.C., neighborhood had no doses left after its last Thursday appointment. She still had four pharmacies left to try to a tip from her mail carrier that a grocery store a few miles away was giving away leftover vaccine.

The World Health Organization said Friday that a vaccine will be a "vital tool" in the global fight against the coronavirus, but it won't end the Covid-19 pandemic World leaders and the public must learn to manage the virus and make permanent adjustments to their daily lives to bring the virus down to low

A world-renowned microbiologist warned that the upcoming vaccine against the Wuhan coronavirus is Thai -German microbiologist Dr. Sucharit Bhakdi made the warning during an interview with Fox Bhakdi commented: “Someone who says this has not the slightest inkling of the basics of immunology.”

(Bloomberg) -- Vaccine coverage won’t reach a point that would stop transmission of the virus in the foreseeable future, the World Health Organization said. United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the world is risking more virus variations by not pushing for vaccines in developing nations.

Moderna plans to begin human studies of a booster shot for its vaccine to help protect against a more-transmissible South Africa virus variant. Thailand found a record number of cases in a migrant labor cluster near Bangkok that’s emerged as a Covid-19 hotspot in a new wave of infections to hit the Southeast Asian nation.

Asia Was a Model for How to Deal With COVID-19. Why Is It Lagging in Vaccine Rollouts?

  Asia Was a Model for How to Deal With COVID-19. Why Is It Lagging in Vaccine Rollouts? But most nations in the Asia-Pacific region, including South Korea, won't begin vaccinating citizens until February or March. New Zealand, another COVID-19 success story, won’t start vaccinating its healthcare workers until April. In the wealthy business hub of Singapore, just 6,000 people have received doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine since Dec. 30, out of a population of 5.7 million.Read More: A Year After COVID-19 Emerged, Asia Struggles to Contain Growing OutbreaksIt’s the deft handling of COVID-19 by many countries that has contributed to them becoming laggards in the vaccine race, experts say.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine has now been cleared for use across North America, Europe and the Middle East, and vaccination campaigns have Other countries got a head start on vaccinations . China and Russia authorized their own shots in July and August, before they’d been fully tested.

Thailand Coronavirus News is a section dedicated to the new coronavirus that is causing an epidemic in China and fast spreading globally. The strain of coronavirus called Covid-19 or also commonly called the Wuhan coronavirus is genetically more potent and faster spreading than the SARS coronavirus.

Why the Mutated Coronavirus Variants Are So Worrisome: QuickTake

According to a Bloomberg ranking, New Zealand holds onto pole position for the third month running as the best place to ride out the pandemic, while Mexico remains last of the ranked economies.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases exceed 99.6 million; deaths pass 2.1 millionBest and Worst Places to Be in Covid: Vaccine Not Slowing DeathsVaccine Tracker: More than 65.7 million shots given worldwideU.S. states ease covid restrictions even as variants take holdMexican billionaire Carlos Slim has Covid-19 with mild symptomsWhy delaying the second Covid vaccine shot is messy: QuickTake

Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here. Click CVID on the terminal for global data on cases and deaths.

Migrant Workers, Porous Borders Mar Southeast Asia Recovery

  Migrant Workers, Porous Borders Mar Southeast Asia Recovery In Southeast Asia, migrant workers at the bottom rungs of society have borne the brunt of Covid-19. Without real efforts to address their plight, the group could prove to be a key risk to the region’s ability to shake off the pandemic. These workers, numbering some 10 million in Southeast Asia, have become the main vectors of recent resurgences of the coronavirus in countries like Malaysia and Thailand, even as they power the industries that produce goods such as rubber gloves and frozen foods that have soared in demand due to the pandemic.

Some viral vector vaccines enter cells and cause them to make viral proteins. Other viral vectors slowly replicate, carrying coronavirus proteins on their The vaccine uses a weakened measles virus that carries a gene for the coronavirus spike protein. Researchers launched a Phase 1 trial in August.

Tune your internet dial to Vaccines .news for updates on the coronavirus vaccine containing This new virus is morphing as you read this, and people who have it are being affected in different ways This virus is using the whole human body as a host to spread. It’s time to listen an expert virologist

Thailand Finds Record Cases Among Migrants (10:47 a.m. HK)

Authorities in Thailand’s Samut Sakhon reported 914 new infections on Monday, with the majority of cases detected from active case finding efforts and testing among the hundreds of thousands of migrant factory workers in the nation’s seafood hub. Almost 800 of the new cases were migrant workers, taking the total caseload in the coastal province to 6,555, Samut Sakhon’s health department data showed.

Lam Asks China for Vaccine, Citing ‘Hiccup’ in Other Orders (10:30 a.m. HK)

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam said she had asked Beijing to supply China-produced vaccines to the Asian financial hub due to a “hiccup” in the other three vaccines it procured in advance, in response to a question on requesting Sinopharm vaccines from the mainland.

Lam told a weekly briefing on Tuesday that “we have a desperate need” to vaccinate high-risk groups, including cross-border workers. She didn’t elaborate further, saying she didn’t want to preempt considerations of the Chinese government. China has been supportive in helping Hong Kong tackle the virus, Lam added.

Teachers push back, churches in court, National Guard: News from around our 50 states

  Teachers push back, churches in court, National Guard: News from around our 50 states How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting every stateStart the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Both vaccines carry RNA instructions that prompt human cells to make the spike protein that the virus uses to infect cells. The findings suggest that vaccine -resistant variants might emerge, meaning that COVID-19 Sampling of heavily touched surfaces might provide a warning of a surge of infections

Both vaccines carry RNA instructions that prompt human cells to make the spike protein that the virus uses to infect cells. The findings suggest that vaccine -resistant variants might emerge, meaning that COVID-19 Sampling of heavily touched surfaces might provide a warning of a surge of infections

Malaysian Palm Oil Workers Under Lockdown in Sabah (10:16 a.m. HK)

Palm oil estates in the Borneo state of Sabah will impose a 30-day lockdown to run a mass testing of workers to curb the spread of the coronavirus, according to the state government.

The lockdown, which is a voluntary measure by the plantation industry to restrict the movement of staff, comes after a spike in Covid-19 cases at estates. Six clusters have been linked to palm oil workers, including 254 positive cases involving migrant employees and their families as of Jan. 24.

Lockdown Skeptic AMLO on Duty in Mexico After Catching Virus (10:01 a.m. HK)

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is continuing to work after contracting Covid-19. He announced his diagnosis in a tweet late Sunday, following a trip that took him to two states amid a surge in infections and deaths in recent days.

South Korea Confirms 354 More Cases; Total 75,875 (8:46 a.m. HK)

South Korea reported 354 new coronavirus cases over the last 24 hours vs. 437 the previous day, according to data from the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency’s website. Total deaths rose by 11 to 1,371.

EU Vaccine Export Limits; Colombia Minister Dies: Virus Update

  EU Vaccine Export Limits; Colombia Minister Dies: Virus Update Germany urged the European Union to limit vaccine exports as a standoff with AstraZeneca Plc over delivery delays worsened. Chancellor Angela Merkel told colleagues the risks from faster-spreading variants means the country is “sitting on a powder keg,” according to Bild newspaper. Ireland is set to extend its lockdown even amid signs the outbreak there is easing, and the U.K. government is expected to announce plans for quarantining travelers. New Zealand is likely to keep its borders closed to the world through most of 2021.Thailand found a record number of cases in a migrant labor cluster near Bangkok.

U.S. Hospitalizations Fall to Lowest in Weeks (7:10 a.m. HK)

U.S. hospitalizations for the coronavirus tumbled to the lowest since mid-December, new data from the Department of Health and Human Services show. There were 114,281 Covid-19 patients in hospitals across the country as of Monday -- a 13% decline from 131,637 on Jan. 15.

Biden Sees Shots Widely Available by Spring (6:55 a.m. HK)

U.S. President Joe Biden says he anticipates that coronavirus vaccines will be available to anyone in the nation by spring -- a target requiring an increases in the current pace of inoculations.

The U.S. is currently administering about 1.2 million shots per day, data compiled by Bloomberg show, and Biden said Monday he expects that will soon reach 1.5 million doses. He said the administration has “commitments from some of the producers that they will in fact produce more vaccine,” though didn’t say which companies.


Gallery: From Wuhan to the White House: A timeline of COVID-19’s spread (Stacker)

a person standing in front of a pier: COVID-19 has spread quickly around the world, causing more than 2 million deaths and infecting more than 97 million people as of Jan. 21, 2021, according to Johns Hopkins' Coronavirus Resource Center. It’s already hard to remember life before COVID-19—but it was less than a year ago when a doctor in China sounded the alarm about a new respiratory virus. Since then, cases have been confirmed in nearly every country and on every continent except Antarctica. The United States today has the most COVID-19 cases in the world, and cases are rising quickly as people defied CDC recommendations to gather for fall and winter holidays.  The story of how COVID-19 spread so far and so fast is a story of government secrecy, delayed action, polarizing politics, and a highly contagious virus. To better understand what has happened and what might follow, Stacker constructed a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic from its first mention by Dr. Li Wenliang in Wuhan, China. Our timeline includes information from a range of sources including news outlets such as the New York Times and CNN, Johns Hopkins' Coronavirus Resource Center, the COVID Tracking Project, science articles, and releases from the World Health Organization (WHO). Keep reading for more information about the COVID-19 pandemic and a better understanding of how a highly contagious virus became a global health crisis.  You may also like: 15 ways doctors are now treating COVID-19

Brazilian Variant Is Found in U.S. (6:45 a.m. HK)

The first case of Covid-19 caused by an emerging Brazilian variant of the virus has been identified in the U.S., in a Minnesota resident who recently returned from a trip to Brazil.

Public health officials have been monitoring for infections caused by mutations now taking hold in South Africa and Brazil, as well as the more-established variant that’s responsible for most cases of the disease in the U.K. The mutant forms of the virus can be more easily transmitted. Eight Minnesota residents have been infected with the U.K. variant.

Single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine 66 percent effective against moderate and severe illness

  Single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine 66 percent effective against moderate and severe illness A coronavirus vaccine that is easier to store and requires a single shot will soon be considered by regulators and could help bolster the nation’s limited supplies. The results, reported in a news release, put a third vaccine on the horizon in the United States — one with logistical advantages that could simplify distribution and expand access to shots in the United States and worldwide.

California, Houston Rethink Vaccine Systems (6:30 a.m. HK)

a man that is standing in the middle of a city at night: Mass Vaccinations as California Passes 3 Million COVID Infections © Getty Images via Bloomberg Mass Vaccinations as California Passes 3 Million COVID Infections

A person takes a photo of a mass Covid-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium, in Los Angeles, on Jan. 22.

Photographer: Mario Tama/Getty Images

California, which trails other states in distributing the vaccine, is creating a new procedure. The state will allow residents to be notified when they are eligible for inoculation and to schedule appointments, Governor Gavin Newsom said Monday.

The state will continue to focus on distributing the vaccine to residents over 65, health-care staff and other essential workers, and from there will transition to age-based availability. California has already tripled the number of vaccines it administers to about 120,000 per weekday, Newsom said.

Harris County, Texas, is abandoning its first-come, first-served online vaccine sign-ups effective Tuesday in favor of a new system that will evaluate recipients according to age, medical history and other factors.

The third-largest U.S. county plans to launch a “smart wait list” that will be accessible through a web link or via phone, according to an announcement on Monday. About 27,000 people have received vaccinations from county health officials, whose territory includes Houston.

Netherlands Riots Rage for Third Night (4:40 a.m. HK)

Groups of rioters confronted police for a third consecutive evening in Dutch cities including Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Zwolle in incidents that started Saturday when a curfew began.

Mask angels, NYC oases, sugar tax: News from around our 50 states

  Mask angels, NYC oases, sugar tax: News from around our 50 states How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting every stateStart the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte earlier on Monday condemned the unrest, labeling it “criminal violence.” The curfew runs between 9 p.m. and 4:30 a.m. in coming weeks and is on top of existing lockdown measures in place until at least Feb. 9.

UN Chief Warns on Vaccine Inequity (3:53 a.m. HK)

If the rich world doesn’t act urgently to help developing countries get their populations vaccinated, more virus mutations could render the current shots ineffective, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said.

“If we believe it’s possible to vaccinate the Global North and forget about the Global South, if we let the virus spread like wildfire in the Global South, it will mutate,” Guterres told the Davos Agenda event on Monday. “And when it mutates, it will come back in a way that vaccines will no longer be relevant.”

Guterres said that many developed countries have bought more vaccines than they need and should put “those that will not be necessary at the disposal of developing countries.” He added that licensing should be made available for developing countries like Brazil and India, which have a “huge capacity of generics,” in order to scale up production of vaccines.

N.Y. to Ease Curbs as Holiday Spike Wanes (3:20 a.m. HK)

New York is in a better place after the post-holiday spike in Covid-19 and can begin to loosen restrictions and increase economic activity, Governor Andrew Cuomo said.

Elective surgeries can resume in Erie County, Cuomo said, and more adjustments will be made over the next couple of days.

Ireland Seeing ‘Rapid Improvement’ (3:05 a.m. HK)

Ireland is seeing “continued rapid improvement” in the incidence of the coronavirus, a top government adviser said, as the nation reported a further drop in new cases.

There were 1,372 more confirmed cases, the lowest level since Dec. 28, with seven deaths. While Ireland has been dealing with one of the worst outbreaks in the world in recent weeks, hospitalizations are now plateauing and may be starting to fall, Philip Nolan told reporters in Dublin.

Russian vaccine Sputnik V more than 90% effective in interim trial

  Russian vaccine Sputnik V more than 90% effective in interim trial The findings were based on an analysis of interim results of a Phase 3 clinical trial published in the Lancet. The Russian vaccine effort has been criticized for being too rushed, elevating nationalistic competition over scientific evidence. The publication in the Lancet, a British medical journal, marks the first large-scale, peer-reviewed results to be published showing the performance of Sputnik V — despite the fact that the vaccine has been in broad use in Russia and is being rolled out to other countries.

Despite the improvement in numbers, the government is likely to keep the country in lockdown until Early March, the Irish Examiner reported.

French Official Warns of Economic Toll (2:42 a.m. HK)

France will miss its economic growth target this year if another nationwide lockdown is imposed to contain the spread of the coronavirus, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Monday in an interview with Bloomberg Television.

“If there is a decision of lockdown in France, of course it will have a direct impact on growth forecasts and it will be very difficult to meet 6% growth,” Le Maire said.

WHO Sees Continued Transmission (2:30 a.m. HK)

Vaccine coverage won’t reach a point that would stop transmission in the foreseeable future, according to Mike Ryan, head of the World Health Organization’s emergencies program. Looking at eradication of the virus as the measure of success will mean the world is going to struggle, he added.

“The bar for success is reducing the capacity of this virus to kill, to put people in hospital, to destroy our economic and social lives,” he said. He said there’s not enough vaccines right now to even serve those who are most at risk.

Separately, WHO officials said the recommended intervals between the first and second shots should be respected.

California Lifts Stay-at-Home Orders (12:48 a.m. HK)

California, a recent epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, has lifted its regional stay-at-home orders as the outbreak slows across the state and hospitalizations ease.

Four-week projections for intensive-care capacity are above 15%, according to a statement Monday by the California Department of Public Health. That’s the threshold that allows regions to exit stay-at-home orders. The San Joaquin Valley, San Francisco Bay Area and Southern California had been under the restrictions.

The most-populous state will return to its four-tiered reopening system for counties, with most areas remaining in the purple tier with the tightest restrictions. Still, lifting the stay-home rules will allow businesses such as outdoor dining to resume.

Italy Has Fewest Cases Since Oct. 14 (12:45 a.m. HK)

Italy registered 8,562 new virus cases on Monday, the lowest daily increase since Oct. 14, from 11,629 the day before. The country reported 420 deaths, from 299 on Sunday; positivity rate rose to 6% from 5.3%.

Italy reported a first case of the new Brazilian virus strain in Varese, Northern Italy, on Monday, according to Ansa newswire.

Moderna to Test Shot on S. Africa Strain (10:15 p.m. HK)

a close up of a bottle: Spain Begins Use of Modera Inc. Covid-19 Vaccine © Bloomberg Spain Begins Use of Modera Inc. Covid-19 Vaccine

The Moderna Covid-19 vaccine.

Photographer: Angel Garcia/Bloomberg

Moderna plans to begin human studies of a booster shot for its vaccine to help protect against a more-transmissible South Africa virus variant, after a test showed it may be less potent against that strain.

Even with the lower antibody levels, the existing vaccine should offer protect against the South Africa strain, Moderna said. But study results may indicate that immunity will wane faster, the company said.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Russian vaccine Sputnik V more than 90% effective in interim trial .
The findings were based on an analysis of interim results of a Phase 3 clinical trial published in the Lancet. The Russian vaccine effort has been criticized for being too rushed, elevating nationalistic competition over scientific evidence. The publication in the Lancet, a British medical journal, marks the first large-scale, peer-reviewed results to be published showing the performance of Sputnik V — despite the fact that the vaccine has been in broad use in Russia and is being rolled out to other countries.

usr: 0
This is interesting!