•   
  •   
  •   

World Kremlin critic Navalny back in court for jail appeal, possible fine

10:35  20 february  2021
10:35  20 february  2021 Source:   reuters.com

Infighting erupts in Russia's anti-Kremlin opposition over Alexei Navalny

  Infighting erupts in Russia's anti-Kremlin opposition over Alexei Navalny Infighting erupts in Russia's anti-Kremlin opposition over Alexei NavalnyMOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian opposition plans to convert anger over Alexei Navalny's arrest and jailing into parliamentary seats at the ruling pro-Kremlin party's expense later this year have suffered a setback after an acrimonious outbreak of infighting.

Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny returned to court on Saturday to hear his lawyers appeal against what they say was a politically-motivated decision to jail him for nearly three years. Navalny , President Vladimir Putin's most prominent critic , was jailed earlier this month for parole violations he said were Later on Saturday, he is due to appear in court again for what is expected to be the culmination of a separate slander trial against him. In the slander case, Navalny stands accused of defaming a World War Two veteran who took part in a promotional video backing constitutional reforms last year

Navalny , President Vladimir Putin's most prominent critic , was jailed this month for almost three years for parole violations he said were trumped up. The West has condemned the case and is discussing possible sanctions on Russia.In the slander case, Navalny stands accused of defaming a World War Two veteran who took part in a promotional video backing constitutional reforms last year that let Putin run for two more terms in the Kremlin after 2024 if he wants. Navalny described the people in the video as traitors and corrupt lackeys. He accuses authorities of using the slander charges to smear his

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny returned to court on Saturday to hear his lawyers appeal against what they say was a politically-motivated decision to jail him for nearly three years.

Alexei Navalny standing in front of a building: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term © Reuters/MAXIM SHEMETOV Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term

Navalny, President Vladimir Putin's most prominent critic, was jailed earlier this month for parole violations he said were trumped up. The West has condemned the case and is discussing possible sanctions on Russia.

Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny again in court for alleged defamation of veteran

  Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny again in court for alleged defamation of veteran The jailed Russian opposition leader has said the case is political. He has accused the government of using the 94-year-old veteran like “a doll on a chain.” The 44-year-old Navalny returned to Russia last month after recovering abroad from a near-fatal poisoning in August, which Navalny has said was a toxic attack ordered by President Vladimir Putin. Navalny was jailed immediately upon arriving in Moscow on Jan. 17, sparking international outrage and mass protests throughout the country.

A Russian court sentenced Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny to three and a half years in jail on Tuesday after ruling he had violated the terms of his parole, but said that his prison term would be shortened for time he had served earlier under house arrest. Navalny , one of President Vladimir Putin's most prominent critics , was arrested at the Russian border on Jan. 17 after returning from Germany where he had been recovering from being poisoned with a military-grade nerve agent. Navalny 's lawyer said the opposition politician would appeal against the ruling.

Standing in a glass box in the back of a court in Moscow, Kremlin critic Alexey Navalny heard his fate -- two years and eight months in a Russian prison for failing to report to parole officers. The thing is, he was in Germany at the time, recovering from a poisoning by a military grade chemical weapon.

As proceedings got underway, a relaxed-looking Navalny said he had heard about a ruling from the European Court of Human Rights asking Russia to free him, a request that Moscow swiftly dismissed as unlawful.

Alexei Navalny looking at the camera: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term © Reuters/MAXIM SHEMETOV Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term

Speaking from a glass courtroom cage, wearing green trousers and a patterned shirt, Navalny told the presiding judge it would be good if the court would now let him go.

Alexei Navalny et al. standing in a room: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term © Reuters/MAXIM SHEMETOV Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term

Later on Saturday, he is due to appear in court again for what is expected to be the culmination of a separate slander trial against him.

'Putin is turning his main threat into a martyr': Will attack on Navalny, journalists and 5,700 detained Russians backfire?

  'Putin is turning his main threat into a martyr': Will attack on Navalny, journalists and 5,700 detained Russians backfire? Russian political figure Alexei Navalny's supporters say he was jailed for the crime of daring to survive Vladimir Putin's efforts to poison him."Putin is turning his main threat into a martyr, a kind of Russian Nelson Mandela," said Jaka Bizilj, the director of the Berlin-based humanitarian group Cinema for Peace Foundation, referring to South Africa's anti-apartheid hero and former president.

Mr Navalny said in court the charges against him were fabricated and again blamed President Vladimir Putin for a nerve agent attack on him last August. Mr Putin "will go down in history as a poisoner", he said vehemently. The hearing is to decide whether to turn Mr Navalny 's suspended sentence into an actual Addressing the court on Tuesday, Mr Navalny said the case was being used to frighten the opposition: "This is how it works: they send one to jail to intimidate millions." On the Novichok chemical attack, he said: "Using the FSB [Federal Security Service of Russia], Putin attempted to commit murder.

A Moscow court has jailed Putin critic Alexei Navalny for three-and-a-half years for violating the conditions of a suspended sentence. He has been in detention since returning to Russia last month. He was treated in Germany for a near-fatal nerve agent attack on him in August. In court he called President Vladimir Putin a "poisoner", blaming him for the attack. His supporters called for an immediate protest, and hundreds gathered in central Moscow and St Petersburg despite a heavy police presence. More than 850 have been detained in Moscow alone, according to monitors.

In the slander case, Navalny stands accused of defaming a World War Two veteran who took part in a promotional video backing constitutional reforms last year that let Putin run for two more terms in the Kremlin after 2024 if he wants.

Alexei Navalny standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term © Reuters/MAXIM SHEMETOV Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term

Navalny, who returned to Russia last month from Germany, where he had been recovering from a near-fatal poisoning with a military-grade nerve toxin in Siberia, described the people in the video as traitors and corrupt lackeys.

a man in a military uniform: Law enforcement officers stand guard outside a court building in Moscow © Reuters/MAXIM SHEMETOV Law enforcement officers stand guard outside a court building in Moscow

He has said his comment was not specifically directed against the veteran however, and that the authorities are using the charge to smear his reputation.

State prosecutors have asked the court to fine Navalny 950,000 roubles ($12,800) for slander.

Navalny's arrest and jailing sparked nationwide street protests in Russia, but his allies say they have now paused serious demonstrations until the spring.

($1 = 73.9500 roubles)

(Reporting by Andrew Osborn/Polina Nikolskaya; Editing by Gabrielle Tétrault-Farber)

Russian opponent Alexeï Navalny transferred to a penal colony .
© Provided by Le Parisien Le Parisien Russian opponent Alexeï Navalny was transferred Thursday from his Moscow prison, where he had been imprisoned since his arrest on his return to Russia in mid-January, to a penal colony, has just announced this Friday the head of Russian prison services, Alexander Kalashnikov. “He was transferred to where he is supposed to be by court order. […] No threat to his life or his health "hangs over the opponent, he said, according to Russian news agencies.

usr: 0
This is interesting!