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World Myanmar Protesters Plan Biggest Rallies Yet After Two Shot Dead

03:55  22 february  2021
03:55  22 february  2021 Source:   bloomberg.com

Myanmar's army pledges stability, but coup could worsen ethnic conflicts

  Myanmar's army pledges stability, but coup could worsen ethnic conflicts Analysts say the military takeover threatens an internationally backed peace process aimed at ending ethnic insurgencies.The official, Bai Yingneng, was unhurt in the Friday attack, but 12 people were reportedly killed, including three teenage officers of Bai’s security force and nine civilians.

Myanmar ’s anti-military protesters plan to hold their largest mass rally yet on Monday after two demonstrators were shot dead this weekend. Shops and businesses are expected to close in solidarity, with the nation’s largest retailer, City Mart, announcing it will shut all of its outlets. The violent crackdown on the largely-peaceful movement risks stunting an already troubled economy. Nearly all private bank branches have closed, while automated teller machines are running out of cash amid surging demand. “We expect to see the biggest crowd of people across the country on Monday,” said

Myanmar ’s anti-military protesters plan to hold their largest mass rally yet on Monday after two demonstrators were shot dead this weekend. Shops and businesses are expected to close in solidarity, with the nation’s largest retailer, City Mart, announcing it will shut all of its outlets. The violent crackdown on the largely-peaceful movement risks stunting an already troubled economy. Nearly all private bank branches have closed, while automated teller machines are running out of cash amid surging demand. “We expect to see the biggest crowd of people across the country on Monday,” said

(Bloomberg) -- Myanmar’s anti-coup protesters plan to hold their largest mass rally yet on Monday after two demonstrators were shot dead over the weekend, with concerns growing about an economic crisis in the Southeast Asian nation.

a large crowd of people: Protesters march through the streets of Yangon on Feb. 19. © Getty Images via Bloomberg Protesters march through the streets of Yangon on Feb. 19.

Many shops and businesses were expected to close in solidarity with protesters, with the nation’s largest retailer, City Mart, announcing it will shut all of its outlets. That adds to concerns about the banking system as many private branches have remained closed and automated teller machines are running out of cash amid surging demand.

Facebook Limits Reach of Posts from Myanmar Military During Coup to Limit 'Misinformation'

  Facebook Limits Reach of Posts from Myanmar Military During Coup to Limit 'Misinformation' "Facebook is treating the situation in Myanmar as an emergency," Facebook's Director of Policy for APAC Emerging Countries Rafael Frankel wrote.The Tatmadaw, Myanmar's military, took control of the country in February following the electoral victory of the National League for Democracy. Alleging election fraud, the Tatmadaw arrested state counselor Aung San Suu Kyi and President Win Myint. A year-long state of emergency was declared by the Tatmadaw. According to the Associated Press, Myanmar's internet service was restored on Sunday after a temporary outage requested by the country's military leaders.

Hundreds of thousands of protesters have rallied in Myanmar for more than two weeks against the coup that ousted Aung San Suu Kyi on February 1. Six people were injured as police opened fire near a shipyard, Myanmar Now reported. " Shooting is still ongoing. Some people are injured," the city's rescue service chairman told Agence France-Presse news The 20-year-old woman was confirmed dead on Friday after spending a week on life support in a hospital. Mya Thwate Thwate Khaing had participated in a massive protest on February 9 in Myanmar 's capital, Naypyitaw, where she was shot .

Many peacefully gathered in the second biggest city Mandalay, the city where soldiers opened fire on civiliansSaturday and killed two people. In Yangon, protesters like Soe Pang showed no sign of relenting, instead he joined the crowds, holding banners that read "reject military coup." Facebook on Sunday took down the main page of the Myanmar military for violating its standards against inciting violence, as the first protester to die following the military coup was laid to rest. Mya Thwate Thwate Khaing lost her fight for life on Friday, 10 days after being hit by a live bullet at a protest in the capital

“We expect to see the biggest crowd of people across the country on Monday,” said Aung Kyaw Kyaw Oo, a lower house lawmaker representing the National League for Democracy, which had won a November election in a landslide before the military rejected the results. “We need to keep fighting against the brutal military.”

Myanmar has seen nationwide demonstrations since the military seized control of the country on Feb. 1, with protesters ignoring a ban on public gatherings. A 20-year old student who was shot in the country’s capital of Naypidaw was the first fatality last week. Two men were killed and more than 20 people injured on Saturday as authorities fired shots to disperse demonstrators in Mandalay.

Singapore on Saturday called the use of lethal force against unarmed civilians was “inexcusable,” while Germany condemned the violence and said the military should pave the way for a return to the democratic process. The United Nations country team in Myanmar expressed “profound concern” over the violence, saying in a statement it “must stop and the fundamental right to peaceful assembly must be respected.”

Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout

  Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout Many citizens in Myanmar have told CNN they are terrified of being dragged from their beds in nighttime or early morning raids, which have become frequent occurrences since the military coup.By day, thousands of people across the country join vibrant demonstrations calling for the military, which seized power in a coup on February 1, to hand back power to civilian control and release ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi. They defiantly bang pots and pans, beat drums, wave creative signs and march en masse through the streets. Government and factory workers have gone on strike to join a growing civil disobedience movement against the takeover.

They come a day after police fired on protesters in the city of Mandalay, killing at least two people. Myanmar protester dies a week after being shot by police 19.02.2021. Tens of thousands of people have joined the biggest rallies yet to condemn the military coup and demand the release of elected

Mass rallies have been hitting the Asian country for over two weeks, with protesters and police clashing after the military seized power and declared a state of emergency.

Myanmar’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said Sunday authorities were “exercising utmost restraint through minimumn use of force” against what it called “unlawful demonstrations, incitements of unrest and violence.” “The ministry views that some statements and remarks made by some embassies in Yangon and foreign countries are tantamount to flagrant interference in internal affairs of Myanmar,” it said.


Gallery: Photos show swelling protests in Myanmar and neighboring countries denouncing the military coup (INSIDER)

Aung San Suu Kyi et al. looking at a cell phone:  Hundreds of doctors, teachers, students, and others in Myanmar are protesting the military's coup. On Monday, the military announced it would be taking over the country for at least a year. Photos show the growing demonstrations in the region as uncertainty about the country's future persists. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. After a week of increasing uncertainty over Myanmar's future, hundreds of teachers and students joined growing demonstrations across the country Friday, to protest the military's coup and show support for jailed leader Aung San Suu Kyi.On Monday, Myanmar's military announced it would be taking over the country for at least a year following the detainment of several top Myanmar politicians. The military cited mass voter fraud as justification for the coup hours before the new parliament was scheduled to meet for the first time since the November election. According to the Associated Press, the country's election commission rejected any claims of voter fraud in the elections that saw the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party win only 33 of 476 possible parliamentary seats. Anger among people in Myanmar has been growing since the coup, as activists and dissidents have encouraged acts of civil disobedience in protest. Earlier this week, medical professionals from 70 hospitals across the country pledged to stop working in protest. In a statement to the international medical community, the doctors said they refused to recognize the military regime. Protests on Thursday led to at least 30 detainments over pot-banging, according to Al Jazeera. Friday, hundreds of teachers and students gathered outside the Yangon University of Education campus to protest, holding signs, wearing red ribbons, and displaying the

The junta separately said security forces “had to fire back” after protesters “turned to riots and anarchy.” It also warned that “public health services have ceased to an extent” as healthcare workers join the Civil Disobedience Movement, and expressed concern that protesters may inhibit more than 900,000 pensioners from accessing funds at banks.

Myanmar military warns protesters could suffer 'loss of life' ahead of planned mass strike

  Myanmar military warns protesters could suffer 'loss of life' ahead of planned mass strike Myanmar's military junta on Sunday warned anti-coup protesters they will "suffer loss of life" if demonstrations confront security forces, ahead of planned mass protests and a nationwide strike. © YeMyo/AP Anti-coup protesters face a row of riot police in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, Feb. 19, 2021. The daily protests campaigning for civil disobedience in Myanmar are increasingly focusing on businesses and government institutions that sustain the economy.

Two anti-coup protesters were shot dead by riot police who fired live rounds Saturday in Mandalay, Myanmar 's second -largest city, local media reported. One of the victims was shot in the head and died at the scene, according to Frontier Myanmar , a news and business magazine based in Yangon, the GettyThis is the latest in our series on underrated destinations, It's Still a Big World.It took me nearly five years of living and traveling in Mexico to make it to Acapulco. I didn’t really have a good reason for not having yet visited Acapulco, other than I typically prefer smaller beach towns.When I finally found

Two protesters were shot dead when police used live ammunition to disperse crowds. The deaths brought widespread condemnation, with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres saying: "The use of lethal force, intimidation & harassment against peaceful demonstrators is unacceptable." Escalating daily protests . The two -week-old civil disobedience movement in Myanmar now has its martyrs - represented in posters, paintings and cartoons at rallies which have continued to take place across the country.

Some automatic teller machines have run out of cash within the first few hours of each day as citizens rush to get a hold of money, according to Pe Myint, a senior consultant at Co-operative Bank.

On top of this, bad traffic has prevented bank employees from going to their offices and changes in the senior management at the central bank may also complicate matters, he said. “It is still unlikely to see the reopening of all private banks before the end of February.”

The youth-led movement has mobilized supporters peacefully in major cities with three main demands: the release of civilian leaders including Aung San Suu Kyi, recognition of the 2020 election results that showed her party won, and a withdrawal of the military from politics.

The military has ordered internet blackouts in recent nights as it tightens its grip on power. Facebook Inc. has pushed back against the coup, with Reuters reporting that the company removed the military’s main social media page for violations of community standards prohibiting the incitement of violence and coordinating harm.

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Myanmar protesters undeterred after deadliest day since coup .
Killing of 18 pro-democracy protesters by security forces and new charges against Aung San Suu Kyi have done nothing to quell anger at military rulers in the streets.In Yangon, the country's most populous city and former capital, some demonstrators threw Molotov cocktails at police. Others snuffed out smoking tear gas canisters fired by security forces. Videos posted to social media showed several people with bullet wounds being rushed away from protest sites to waiting ambulances in the southeastern town of Dawei.

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