•   
  •   
  •   

World Violence against civilians surges in Afghanistan after peace talks: UN report

09:57  23 february  2021
09:57  23 february  2021 Source:   reuters.com

Exclusive: Taliban Warns Biden Going Back on Afghanistan Deal 'Causes Problems'

  Exclusive: Taliban Warns Biden Going Back on Afghanistan Deal 'Causes Problems' "There is no doubt that adherence to the agreement and its provisions will contribute greatly to ending the war and solving problems, because it was the result of tremendous efforts," Taliban spokesperson Mohammad Naeem told Newsweek.As the May 1 deadline approaches that was set in that agreement struck a year ago this month by President Donald Trump with the organization officially known as the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan for a total U.S. troop withdrawal, Taliban spokesperson Mohammad Naeem urged the U.S. to stick to its word.

By Abdul Qadir Sediqi and Charlotte Greenfield

a person talking on a cell phone: An Afghan woman cries at the site of a bomb blast after she heard her relative was among of the victims, in Kabul, Afghanistan © Reuters/OMAR SOBHANI An Afghan woman cries at the site of a bomb blast after she heard her relative was among of the victims, in Kabul, Afghanistan

KABUL (Reuters) - Civilian casualties in Afghanistan escalated sharply after peace talks began last year, the United Nations said in a report released on Tuesday, calling for a ceasefire as negotiators met for the first time after weeks of inaction.

a group of people walking down a dirt road: A damaged bicycle is seen after a bomb blast in Kabul, Afghanistan © Reuters/OMAR SOBHANI A damaged bicycle is seen after a bomb blast in Kabul, Afghanistan

U.S.-brokered peace talks began in September but progress has since slowed and violence has risen with uncertainty over whether international forces will pull out troops by May as originally planned.

Reject the arguments for staying in Afghanistan

  Reject the arguments for staying in Afghanistan The momentum to keep American troops engrossed in a 20-year civil war has been given a fresh bolt of energy. The intellectual adrenaline shot was given by the Afghanistan Study Group, co-chaired by former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joe Dunford. © Provided by Washington Examiner Dunford recommended delaying former President Donald Trump's May 1 troop withdrawal timetable. Since the 84-page report was published, a flurry of editorials and op-eds have piggybacked on its recommendations. On Feb.

Civilian casualties were 8,820 in 2020, according to the United Nations' mission to Afghanistan's (UNAMA) annual report. That was 15% lower than the previous year, but the report's authors noted with alarm a sharp uptick and historically high civilian casualties in the final three months of 2020, when peace talks began.

a man standing in front of a building: Afghan security forces inspect the site of a blast in Kabul © Reuters/MOHAMMAD ISMAIL Afghan security forces inspect the site of a blast in Kabul

Last year "could have been the year of peace in Afghanistan. Instead, thousands of Afghan civilians perished," said Deborah Lyons, head of UNAMA, reiterating calls for a ceasefire which has been repeatedly rejected by the Taliban. "Parties refusing to consider a ceasefire must recognise the devastating consequences."

Joe Biden's State Department Denies Role in Taliban Pipeline Talks With Turkmenistan

  Joe Biden's State Department Denies Role in Taliban Pipeline Talks With Turkmenistan After the president canceled permits for the Keystone XL pipeline claims swirled alleging his administration's involvement in the central Asian pipeline project.The U.S has been a long-time supporter of the so-called "TAPI pipeline," named after the countries it is planned to cross. Although the Clinton, Obama and Trump adminstrations have supported it, the U.S. has not spent any money on it, according to PolitiFact.


Video: Libyan minister escapes 'assassination attempt' (Reuters)

The Taliban on Tuesday issued a response critical of the report, saying "the concerns, precise information and accurate details that were shared by us have not been taken into account."

The report said that for the first time since records began, deaths and injuries had escalated in the final three months of the year from the previous three months. Casualties for the fourth quarter were up 45% compared with the same period in 2019.

The majority of were ascribed to non-government actors, predominately the insurgent Taliban, and more than one-fifth were attributed to government forces.

A government spokesman did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Both sides said on Twitter their chief negotiators met in Doha, the venue for talks, on Monday evening, adding that teams would continue work on an agenda.

After a monthlong break over the new year period, negotiators returned to Doha briefly before many senior members of the Taliban left to hold meetings in Russia and Iran. Mujahid said they would hold further meetings soon.

Zabihullah said that the lull was only a break and the Taliban were committed to talks, with further meetings expected in coming days.

(Reporting by Charlotte Greenfield in Islamabad and Abdul Qadir Sediqi in Kabul; Additional reporting by Orooj Hakimi in Kabul. Editing by Gerry Doyle)

U.S. 'War on Terror' Covered Nearly Half the World in Past 3 Years, This Map Shows Where .
Brown University's Stephanie Savell told Newsweek the president's "America is Back" rhetoric "is worrisome because it signals a potential return to a militarized status quo in which the US is exporting its militaristic approach and its weapons to many, many places."The data was released Thursday by the Costs of War project at Brown University's Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs. Researchers found that the U.S. conducted counterterrorism operations in some 85 countries from 2018 through 2020.

usr: 0
This is interesting!