•   
  •   
  •   

World Facebook bans Myanmar's military accounts after deadly coup

11:27  25 february  2021
11:27  25 february  2021 Source:   msn.com

Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout

  Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout Many citizens in Myanmar have told CNN they are terrified of being dragged from their beds in nighttime or early morning raids, which have become frequent occurrences since the military coup.By day, thousands of people across the country join vibrant demonstrations calling for the military, which seized power in a coup on February 1, to hand back power to civilian control and release ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi. They defiantly bang pots and pans, beat drums, wave creative signs and march en masse through the streets. Government and factory workers have gone on strike to join a growing civil disobedience movement against the takeover.

Facebook acted after facing criticism for years over how Myanmar ’ s military has used the site, including to incite hatred against the country’s mostly Muslim Rohingya minority group. Since the coup earlier this month, which ousted the civilian leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and returned Myanmar to full military rule, the military has repeatedly shut off In a statement, the company said it was banning “remaining” accounts linked to the military because the coup was “an emergency.” “Events since the February 1 coup , including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban ,” the company said.

Facebook has banned all accounts linked to Myanmar ' s army. The social media giant has cited the events and the violence since the February 1 coup as the reason behind the ban . "Events since the February 1 coup , including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban ," Facebook said in a statement. "We believe the risks of allowing the Tatmadaw [ Myanmar military ] on Facebook and Instagram are too great."

  • Myanmar's military has been banned from using Facebook and Instagram with immediate effect, Facebook said in a blog post on Thursday.
  • "Events since the February 1 coup, including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban. We believe the risks of allowing the Tatmadaw on Facebook and Instagram are too great," the statement said.
  • Myanmar's army seized power after arresting members of the democratically elected government, including Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi.
a group of people crossing a street in front of a crowd: Pro-military supporters throw projectiles at residents in Yangon on February 25, 2021, following weeks of mass demonstrations against the military coup. © Provided by CNBC Pro-military supporters throw projectiles at residents in Yangon on February 25, 2021, following weeks of mass demonstrations against the military coup.

SINGAPORE — Myanmar's military has been banned from using Facebook and Instagram with immediate effect, Facebook said in a blog post on Thursday.

Myanmar Protesters Plan Biggest Rallies Yet After Two Shot Dead

  Myanmar Protesters Plan Biggest Rallies Yet After Two Shot Dead Myanmar’s anti-coup protesters plan to hold their largest mass rally yet on Monday after two demonstrators were shot dead over the weekend, with concerns growing about an economic crisis in the Southeast Asian nation. © Getty Images via Bloomberg Protesters march through the streets of Yangon on Feb. 19. Many shops and businesses were expected to close in solidarity with protesters, with the nation’s largest retailer, City Mart, announcing it will shut all of its outlets.

Myanmar ' s military seized South-east Asian nation in a coup on 1 February and declared a state of emergency. The country has seen weeks of protests as a result, with at least three protesters and one policemen having been killed in violence at rallies. "Events since the 1 February coup , including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban . We believe the risks of allowing the Tatmadaw [ Myanmar military ] on Facebook and Instagram are too great." It will also be banning Tatmadaw-linked commercial entities from advertising on the platform, adding that these bans would remain

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Social media giant Facebook announced Thursday it was banning all accounts linked to Myanmar ’ s military as well as ads from military -controlled companies in the wake of the army’s seizure of power on Feb. It said in a statement that it was treating the post- coup situation in Myanmar as an “emergency,” explaining that the ban was precipitated by events since the coup , including “ deadly violence.” Facebook already has banned several military -linked accounts since the coup , including army-controlled Myawaddy TV and state television broadcaster MRTV.

"Events since the February 1 coup, including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban. We believe the risks of allowing the Tatmadaw on Facebook and Instagram are too great," the statement said, referring to the official name of Myanmar's armed forces.

Military-controlled state and media companies will also be blocked from the two social media platforms, while army-linked commercial firms will not be able to run advertisements.

The ban does not affect government ministries and agencies that provide essential public services, such as the health ministry and the education ministry, the social media giant said.

Myanmar's army seized power on Feb. 1, after arresting members of the democratically elected government, including Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. The military claimed there was voter fraud in last year's election and declared a one-year state of emergency.

Western countries step up pressure on Myanmar junta as protests go on

  Western countries step up pressure on Myanmar junta as protests go on Western countries step up pressure on Myanmar junta as protests go onA general strike shut businesses in the Southeast Asian country on Monday as huge crowds gathered peacefully despite a warning from authorities to stop attending the rallies.

Facebook has removed Myanmar ' s military page from its platform after two more protestors were killed in a deadly weekend of anti- coup demonstrations. The military 's main page on Facebook was taken down on Sunday under the platform's policy against inciting violence, the social network said. Human rights organisations estimate that 640 people have been arrested, charged, or sentenced in Myanmar since the military seized power on February 1. The UK, US, and Canada have previously slapped sanctions on Myanmar ' s military after the country's parliament was prevented from

The Myanmar military has been banned from Facebook and Instagram with immediate effect, as the first pro- military rally took place in Yangon. In a blog post, Facebook said: “Events since the February 1 coup , including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban ,” adding: “We believe the risks of Facebook said it would also ban all “Tadmadaw-linked commercial entities” from advertising on its platforms. It said the decision to ban the Myanmar army was due to “exceptionally severe human rights abuses and the clear risk of future military -initiated violence in Myanmar ”, as well as the army’ s

Thousands of people have protested the coup, and clashes with authorities have sometimes turned violent. Reports say at least three protesters and one policeman have died so far.

Facebook said it has in recent years removed content from military pages and accounts for violating its community standards and to prevent the Tatmadaw from abusing the platform.

It will now "indefinitely" suspend the army accounts, the company said, citing reasons such as the military's history of "exceptionally severe human rights abuses and the clear risk of future military-initiated violence in Myanmar."

It added that the military has been trying to rebuild networks involving misrepresentation and upload content that was previously removed for breaching Facebook's policies against violence, incitement and coordinating harm.

Containers Pile Up at Myanmar Ports as Coup Protests Snarl Trade

  Containers Pile Up at Myanmar Ports as Coup Protests Snarl Trade (Bloomberg) -- Supply Lines is a daily newsletter that tracks Covid-19’s impact on trade. Sign up here, and subscribe to our Covid-19 podcast for the latest news and analysis on the pandemic. Thousands of striking truck drivers in Myanmar protesting the military coup have slowed delivery of imports, trapping cargo containers at ports and prompting at least one international shipping line to halt new orders. About 100 containers a day are moving out of Yangon’s four main ports, said Myo Htut Aung, joint secretary of the Myanmar Container Trucking Association, down from an average of 800 boxes before the coup.

The military coup in Myanmar is attempting to block access to Facebook for the sake of "stability" as citizens use the platform to organise protests against the overthrowing of the government. Ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi has now been remanded in detention until 15 February, prompting citizens Facebook previously admitted failing to do enough to prevent the Myanmar military inciting violence against the country' s minority Rohingya population. The company banned 20 high-ranking Myanmar military officials in August 2018 for racist language and posts celebrating massacres of members of

Technology. Social media giant Facebook bans all accounts linked to Myanmar ’ s military along with ads from military -linked firms.

"The coup greatly increases the danger posed by the behaviors above, and the likelihood that online threats could lead to offline harm," Facebook said.

A report commissioned by Facebook found in 2018 that the social media giant had previously failed to stop the platform "from being used to foment division and incite offline violence."

"We agree that we can and should do more," Facebook said at that time.

In 2018, the tech giant banned military-linked individuals and organizations, including junta leader Min Aung Hlaing, the general who mounted the recent coup.

Myanmar protesters undeterred after deadliest day since coup .
Killing of 18 pro-democracy protesters by security forces and new charges against Aung San Suu Kyi have done nothing to quell anger at military rulers in the streets.In Yangon, the country's most populous city and former capital, some demonstrators threw Molotov cocktails at police. Others snuffed out smoking tear gas canisters fired by security forces. Videos posted to social media showed several people with bullet wounds being rushed away from protest sites to waiting ambulances in the southeastern town of Dawei.

usr: 4
This is interesting!