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World Myanmar police raid protest district as World Bank halts some payments

05:36  26 february  2021
05:36  26 february  2021 Source:   reuters.com

Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout

  Myanmar protesters live in fear of nighttime arrests during an internet blackout Many citizens in Myanmar have told CNN they are terrified of being dragged from their beds in nighttime or early morning raids, which have become frequent occurrences since the military coup.By day, thousands of people across the country join vibrant demonstrations calling for the military, which seized power in a coup on February 1, to hand back power to civilian control and release ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi. They defiantly bang pots and pans, beat drums, wave creative signs and march en masse through the streets. Government and factory workers have gone on strike to join a growing civil disobedience movement against the takeover.

The World Bank has halted payments to projects in Myanmar on withdrawal requests that were made after a Feb. The army seized power and detained civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and much of her party leadership after the military complained of fraud in a November election. The coup has triggered weeks of protests and strikes. The United States, Britain and others, calling for the restoration of democracy, have imposed limited sanctions aimed at members of the junta and its business links.

The World Bank has halted payments to projects in Myanmar on withdrawal requests made after a Feb. A World Bank spokesman verified the letter, from World Bank Myanmar country director Mariam Sherman to the Myanmar Ministry of Planning, Finance and Industry, which said that the bank would make payments to Myanmar project suppliers, contractors and consultants for withdrawal applications made prior to that date.

(Reuters) - Myanmar police launched a crackdown overnight in a Yangon district after breaking up a protest to oppose a military appointed local official, as the World Bank halted payments to projects in the country that were made after the Feb. 1 coup.

a group of people riding skis on a snowy road: Riot police officers stand guard during a rally against the military coup at the University of Yangon © Reuters/STRINGER Riot police officers stand guard during a rally against the military coup at the University of Yangon

The Southeast Asian country has been in crisis since the army seized power and detained the civilian government leader Aung San Suu Kyi and much of her party leadership after the military complained of fraud in a November election.

Myanmar Protesters Plan Biggest Rallies Yet After Two Shot Dead

  Myanmar Protesters Plan Biggest Rallies Yet After Two Shot Dead Myanmar’s anti-coup protesters plan to hold their largest mass rally yet on Monday after two demonstrators were shot dead over the weekend, with concerns growing about an economic crisis in the Southeast Asian nation. © Getty Images via Bloomberg Protesters march through the streets of Yangon on Feb. 19. Many shops and businesses were expected to close in solidarity with protesters, with the nation’s largest retailer, City Mart, announcing it will shut all of its outlets.

Myanmar protesters undeterred by police violence. Migrants return 'of their own free will'. Malaysian immigration chief Khairul Dzaimee Daud said the returned migrants did not include asylum-seekers or members of the Rohingya Muslim minority, who are not recognized as citizens in Myanmar . The ethnic Intha people say that they have not been able to fully capitalize on tourism because most hotels and businesses in the area are owned by people with connections to the military. Before the coup, local people say they could at least get some benefits from a booming tourism industry.

Police fire a water cannon at protesters rallying against the military coup and to demand the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar , February 9, 2021. © REUTERS/Stringer. New Zealand has severed all ties with the Burmese military government, announcing a travel ban on its leadership, as protesters turned out in force in Myanmar against the overthrow of de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi. New Zealand doesn’t recognize the military junta as the legitimate representative of the Burmese people, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta stated on Monday, demanding the military

There have been daily protests and strikes by pro-democracy supporters for about three weeks, often drawing hundreds of thousands of people across the diverse nation stretching from the country.

Violence broke out on the streets of the commercial hub of Yangon on Thursday after some in a crowd of about 1,000 military loyalists attacked pro-democracy supporters and media.

Several people were beaten by groups of men, some armed with knives, others firing catapults and hurling stones, witnesses said. At least two people were stabbed, video footage showed.

In a separate incident, riot police fired tear gas into the Tamwe neighbourhood of Yangon to disperse a crowd protesting the replacement of a local official by the military, according to a witness and live-streamed video.

Killing of protesters fuels anti-coup demonstrations in Myanmar

  Killing of protesters fuels anti-coup demonstrations in Myanmar Three people have now been killed by security forces defending the military's takeover, but the deaths are only adding fuel to the pro-democracy movement's fire.The massive show of people power has yielded images that have gone viral on social media around the world, as peaceful demonstrators defied a foreboding warning from the military junta that seized power early this month.

Myanmar police on Tuesday arrested over two dozen protesters who defied a ban on large gatherings and fired water cannons during a fourth straight day of huge anti-coup demonstrations, per Reuters. Why it matters: This week's protests , triggered by the army seizing power and detaining elected officials including leader Aung San Suu Kyi last week, are the biggest since 2007's "Saffron Revolution" that led to democratic reforms in the country.Support safe, smart, sane journalism. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here.Driving the news: The 2007 movement was led by saffron-robed monks, who are

(Reuters) - Supporters of ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi clashed with police on Friday as hundreds of thousands joined nationwide pro-democracy demonstrations in defiance of the military junta's call to halt mass gatherings. Friday's mostly peaceful protests were the biggest so far, and came a day after Washington imposed sanctions on generals who led the takeover. Three people were wounded when police fired rubber bullets to break up a crowd of tens of thousands in the southeastern city of Mawlamyine, a Myanmar Red Cross official told Reuters.

Residents later said they heard repeated shots and that police had remained in some parts of the district until around 2 a.m. on Friday.

"We were really scared," said one of the residents, who asked not be named.

Suu Kyi supporters posted on social media that they intended to hold another protest in Tamwe on Friday morning.

Facebook said that due to the "deadly violence" since the coup it had banned the Myanmar military from using its Facebook and Instagram platforms.

Military chief General Min Aung Hlaing says authorities are using minimal force. Nevertheless, at least three protesters and one policeman have been killed in violence.

WORLD BANK HALTS PAYMENTS

The World Bank has halted payments to projects in Myanmar on withdrawal requests that were made after the coup, the bank said in a letter to Myanmar's finance ministry seen by Reuters.

World Bank President David Malpass said last week it was taking an "extra cautious" approach to Myanmar but was continuing to execute past projects, including emergency coronavirus relief.

Myanmar police deploy early to crank up pressure on protests

  Myanmar police deploy early to crank up pressure on protests YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Police in Myanmar on Saturday escalated their crackdown on demonstrators against this month’s military takeover, deploying early and in force as protesters sought to assemble in the country's two biggest cities. Myanmar’s crisis took a dramatic turn Friday on the international stage when the country’s ambassador to the United Nations at a special session of the General Assembly declared his loyalty to the ousted civilian government of Aung San Suu Kyi and called on the world to pressure the military to cede power.

Myanmar 's security forces have shown more restraint compared with earlier crackdowns against people who pushed for democracy during almost half a century of direct military rule. Military chief General Min Aung Hlaing has said this week authorities were following a democratic path in dealing with the protests and police were using minimal force, such as rubber bullets, state media reported. Nonetheless, three protesters and one policeman have been killed in violence at rallies.

“ Myanmar police should immediately end the use of excessive and lethal force” against the protesters , said the statement from the New York-based watchdog. With millions of Chinese facing mandatory coronavirus tests to travel during the Lunar New Year holiday, some enterprising private firms are eyeing a potential boon from more personalised but pricier services, such as swab tests at home or at work. China is one of only a few countries that offer such house-call services, which can be booked on mobile phone apps and allow users to avoid long waits in crowded queues at test centres

Last year, the World Bank approved over $350 million in new loans and grants to aid Myanmar's pandemic efforts and to support farmers and rural employment.

The United States, Britain and others have called for Suu Kyi's release and the restoration of democracy, and have imposed limited sanctions aimed at members of the junta and its business links.

Britain said on Thursday it would sanction six more military figures, adding to 19 previously listed and including Min Aung Hlaing.

"Today's package of measures sends a clear message to the military regime in Myanmar that those responsible for human rights violations will be held to account," Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said.

The army said its overthrow of the government was within the constitution after its complaints of fraud in the Nov. 8 election, swept by Suu Kyi's party, had been ignored. The election commission said the vote was fair.

The army has promised a new election after reviewing voter lists. It has not given a date but it imposed a one-year state of emergency when it seized power.

Suu Kyi has been detained incommunicado at her home in the capital Naypyitaw but her party says its November victory must be respected.

The question of a new election is at the centre of a diplomatic effort by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Myanmar is a member, aimed at easing the crisis.

Indonesia has taken the lead in the attempt and its foreign minister, Retno Marsudi, met her military-appointed Myanmar counterpart, Wunna Maung Lwin, for talks in Thailand this week.

But Indonesia's intervention has raised suspicion among coup opponents who fear it will confer legitimacy on the junta and its bid to scrap the November vote and arrange a re-run.

Retno did not mention an election in comments to reporters after her talks but emphasised "an inclusive democratic transition process".

(Reporting by Reuters Staff; Writing by Ed Davies; Editing by Stephen Coates)

Myanmar authorities kill at least 38 protesters in bloodiest day since coup .
At least 38 protesters were killed by authorities in Myanmar on Wednesday, marking the bloodiest day since the military seized power in an apparent coup last month. Demonstrations have been taking place in cities across the Southeast Asian country since its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and other members of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party were detained by the military on Feb. 1. The protest movement has been growing and the military junta, which calls itself the State Administration Council, has become increasingly violent in its response as weeks of internet shutdowns, threats and mass arrests have not stopped thousands of people from voicing their opposition.

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