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World Recent killings in Afghanistan highlight ongoing issue of violence against women

12:05  05 march  2021
12:05  05 march  2021 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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Violence against women and girls is exceptionally high in Afghanistan and is almost at a pandemic level, with up to 87.2 percent of women having experienced some form of violence , such as physical, psychological, sexual, economic violence , social abuse as well as forced and early marriage. Recent targeted killings and intimidation of high -level female government officials and activists also raise fears about increased violence against women . Such incidents still remain largely under-reported because of the associated stigma. Prevailing insecurity and weak rule of law have further hampered women 's

A fourth women wounded in the attack was admitted to hospital in a critical condition, hospitals officials. Afghanistan 's President Ashraf Ghani condemned the attack, which local police initially blamed on the insurgent Taliban, who denied any involvement. "Such attacks on our innocent compatriots, especially women , contradict the teachings of Islam, Afghan culture and the spirit of peace, and make the Violence has risen around Afghanistan and media workers and civil society members in urban areas have been targeted in recent months even as a peace process takes place in Qatar's capital of Doha.

The killing of three female journalists and one doctor this week have once again thrown the issue of violence against women in Afghanistan into sharp focus, even as peace talks between the Taliban and the Afghan government continue.

ISIS in Afghanistan has claimed responsibility for an attack on Tuesday in the city of Jalalabad, which saw journalists Mursal Waheedi, Saadia Sadat and Shahnaz Raufi, of the Enikas television station, shot dead. Then, on Thursday morning, a female gynecologist, Dr Sadaf Elyas, was killed in another attack.

a group of people that are standing in the dirt © Rahmat Gul/AP

According to Attaullah Khogianai, the spokesperson for the governor of Jalalabad, Elyas was on her way to the central hospital in Jalalabad when a sticky bomb was attached to the three-wheeler rickshaw she was riding in. The bomb exploded, and she was killed on the spot, the spokesperson said.

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JALALABAD, Afghanistan (Reuters) - Three female media workers were shot dead in the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad on Tuesday, government officials said, amid a wave of killings that is spreading fear among professional workers in urban centres. Government sources said the women were killed on their way home from work and witnesses said gunmen shot the women in the head before fleeing. A fourth woman was injured and a hospital spokesman said she had been admitted to hospital and was fighting for her life.

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MORE: Targeted killings threaten Afghanistan's postwar future

While most of the recent attacks on women have been claimed by ISIS, the Afghan government has accused the Taliban of being behind the spate of killings. The militant group has denied responsibility.

Part of the reason the Afghan government is blaming the Taliban is because people linked to the group were recently found guilty of killing various government employees, and one suspect detained in connection to the killings is a known member of the Taliban, an official said.

Now, the government will likely face criticism for failing to protect its citizens at a crucial time in the country's history, when attacks by the Taliban are constant despite the historic withdrawal agreement the militant group reached with the U.S. and despite the group's continued negotiations with the government.

Three female journalists killed by gunmen in Afghanistan in latest wave of violence

  Three female journalists killed by gunmen in Afghanistan in latest wave of violence Three female media workers were shot dead in the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad on Tuesday, government officials said, amid a wave of killings that is spreading fear among professional workers in urban centers. © Sadaqat Ghorzang/AP Afghans carry the body of a woman who was killed in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, on March 2. Zalmai Latifi, head of local broadcaster Enikas TV, said the three women were recent high school graduates aged between 18 and 20 who worked in the station's dubbing department.

KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban waged a sustained assault against an Afghan intelligence complex in the city of Aybak on Monday, killing at least 11 people and wounding more than 60 others, part of a bloody wave of violence across the country’s north. With the opening of peace talks between the insurgency and the Afghan government stalled for months, the Taliban have intensified their And it broke with the Taliban tactics in recent months of escalating violence in the countryside without claiming many of the attacks, while the cities were largely spared except for hit-and-run assassinations.

International legal framework. DEDAW. CEDAW. VDPA. DEVAW. Belém do Pará. Maputo. Istanbul. Related topics. Prosecution of gender-targeted crimes. Women 's shelter. 25 November. 6 February. By country.

a group of people walking down a dirt road: Afghan journalists film at the site of a bombing attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, Feb. 20, 2021. © Rahmat Gul/AP Afghan journalists film at the site of a bombing attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, Feb. 20, 2021.

Some believe the killing of the four female professionals in a country as conservative as Afghanistan, is an attempt by extremists to create a climate of fear in a nation which has long struggled with incorporating the rights of women into public society. Hard-won gains could now be at risk, rights groups have repeatedly warned.

"These attacks are meant to intimidate; they are intended to make reporters cower; the culprits hope to stifle freedom of speech in a nation where the media has flourished during the past 20 years," the U.S. Embassy in Kabul tweeted. "This cannot be tolerated."

The killings of Waheedi, Sadat and Raufi also highlight another ongoing problem: the targeted killing of journalists.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Relatives carry the body of one of three women working for a local radio and TV station who were killed on Tuesday in attacks claimed by the Islamic State group, during her funeral ceremony in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, March 3, 2021. © AP Relatives carry the body of one of three women working for a local radio and TV station who were killed on Tuesday in attacks claimed by the Islamic State group, during her funeral ceremony in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, March 3, 2021.

In 2020, the Committee to Protect Journalists said that Afghanistan was the most dangerous country in the world for media workers.

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And on Thursday, the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission also called for the UK "to open an independent public inquiry to review and investigate the allegations of unlawful killings by UK Special Forces". Last year, the BBC's Panorama programme revealed that the UK had failed to fully investigate credible evidence of a "The US and UK, and other countries with an armed presence in Afghanistan [should] respond to these media reports, and to investigate their forces' participation, and leadership, of acts of violence against Afghan non-combatants," the AIHRC said in a statement.

UN General Assembly defines " violence against women " as "any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or mental harm or suffering to women , including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life." The 1993 Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women noted that this violence could be perpetrated by assailants of either gender, family members and even the State itself. Honor- Killing in Afghanistan : Father Kills His Daughter and Her Lover « RAWA News.

MORE: New killings deepen Afghan journalists' assassination fears

Shaharzad Akbar, the chairperson of the Afghanistant Independent Human Rights Commission, reacted to the news of the killings on Twitter, saying that the "Afghan media community has suffered too much" and "Afghan women have been targeted and killed too often."

MORE: Fear, uncertainty meet US troop withdrawal announcement in Afghanistan

"Afghan women are again anxious about an uncertain future," Akbar wrote. "To reach peace, fundamental human rights for all should be recognized & preserved. Any [political] process should include women's voices, concerns & aspirations & benefit from their expertise & experience."

She added that recognizing equality "is key to lasting peace" in the country.

Mexican women have been physically, sexually abused for participating in protests .
In Mexico, women have been victims of human rights violations, including violence and rape, after participating in protests, according to an Amnesty International report.As the crowd around her was looking for a way out, she saw several police officers beating some teenage women. She ran toward the officers and screamed at them until they left the young women alone, who then fled in terror.

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