•   
  •   
  •   

World China Blames U.S. for 'Strong Smell of Gunpowder and Drama'

11:55  20 march  2021
11:55  20 march  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

China summons UK ambassador as media freedom fight escalates

  China summons UK ambassador as media freedom fight escalates Beijing has summoned Britain's ambassador to China over an article she wrote on press freedom, escalating a bitter row between the two countries that has spilled over to the media industry. © K. Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post/Getty Images Caroline Wilson, Consul General to Hong Kong & Macao of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland; addresses at the Signing ceremony of the refund certificate to the MSAR of Recovered Assets by the United Kingdom in the light of the UN Convention Against Corruption at the Macau Government Headquarters. 03NOV15 (Photo by K. Y.

China blamed the U.S. for a "strong smell of gunpowder and drama" on Friday after the two nations exchanged barbs during their first face-to-face meeting since President Joe Biden took office.

a group of people sitting at a table in front of a curtain: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (2nd R), joined by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan (R), speaks while facing Yang Jiechi (2nd L), director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office, and Wang Yi (L), China's Foreign Minister at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska on March 18, 2021. © FREDERIC J. BROWN/Getty Images U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (2nd R), joined by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan (R), speaks while facing Yang Jiechi (2nd L), director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office, and Wang Yi (L), China's Foreign Minister at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska on March 18, 2021.

Speaking from Beijing on Friday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian accused U.S. diplomats of making "groundless attacks" against China's foreign and domestic policies when the countries met a day earlier in Anchorage, Alaska.

WHO origins investigator defends Wuhan lab and blames lack of access on ‘anti-China political rhetoric’

  WHO origins investigator defends Wuhan lab and blames lack of access on ‘anti-China political rhetoric’ A key member of the World Health Organization team that investigated COVID-19’s origins in China in early 2021 defended a Wuhan lab’s removal of a viral sample database from public view and said it was the fault of “anti-China political rhetoric” that resulted in the Chinese Communist Party blocking an investigation for a year. © Provided by Washington Examiner Officials from both the Trump and Biden administrations have said the Chinese government worked to thwart investigations into the origins of the virus, which has killed 2.63 million worldwide, and the WHO-China report is slated to be released next week.

"It was the U.S. side that...provoked the dispute in the first place, so the two sides had a strong smell of gunpowder and drama from the beginning in the opening remarks. It was not the original intention of the Chinese side," Zhao told reporters at a daily briefing, the Associated Press reported.

Zhao's remarks came after Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Chinese Communist Party foreign affairs chief Yang Jiechi argued over trade, technology, human rights, cybersecurity and China's territorial claims to Taiwan and islands in the South China and East China seas.

Tensions developed between both sides early into the talks on Thursday, with the Americans accusing the Chinese of authoritarianism and human rights violations while China hit back by accusing the U.S. of hypocrisy and "advancing its own democracy."

Biden lays groundwork for high-stakes China meeting

  Biden lays groundwork for high-stakes China meeting President Biden is preparing to confront China on a range of issues in the coming week as he seeks to reassert America's position on the global stage.Secretary of State Antony Blinken and national security adviser Jake Sullivan are set to meet with their Chinese counterparts in Alaska in what will be the first high-level meeting between the two countries since Biden took office.The meeting will follow an effort by the White House to demonstrate U.S. solidarity with its allies in the Indo-Pacific. Biden is seeking to work in solidarity with other countries to stand up to Beijing, in contrast with his predecessor's go-it-alone approach.

Blinken said China's actions in Xinjiang—the region where the country has been accused of humans rights abuses by detaining over a million Uyghur Muslims—along with its authoritarian approach in Hong Kong and Taiwan "threaten global stability."

"Each of these actions threaten the rules-based order that maintains global stability," Blinken said. "That's why they're not merely internal matters and why we feel an obligation to raise these issues here today."

National security adviser Jake Sullivan then added that China's actions were an "assault on basic values" and said, "We do not seek conflict, but we welcome stiff competition."

Blinken also accused China of "grandstanding" in its opening remarks and said the nation aimed to focus "on public theatrics and dramatics over substance."

In response, China retorted by accusing the U.S. of being roiled by its own domestic discontent and called the attacks against its policies "unwarranted."

Bipartisanship in a divided Senate? On China, perhaps

  Bipartisanship in a divided Senate? On China, perhaps Senate Republicans are not closing the door to working with Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on China.The Senate majority leader is vowing to put a bill on the floor this spring aimed at curbing Beijing’s growing economic influence, human-rights abuses and threats to U.S. national security. Schumer, a longtime China hawk, knows he needs Republicans to get his bill done. And while Senate Republicans were livid after Schumer pushed forward on a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package without GOP votes, they’re not closing the door to working with the New York Democrat on China.

"We believe that it is important for the United States to change its own image and to stop advancing its own democracy in the rest of the world," Yang said, according to the AP. "Many people within the United States actually have little confidence in the democracy of the United States."

Yang added that "China will not accept unwarranted accusations from the U.S. side" and said that recent developments had plunged relations "into a period of unprecedented difficulty" that "has damaged the interests of our two peoples."

The two nations are set to meet again on Friday, this time in a closed-door session.

Though the exchange on Thursday felt icy at times, a senior Biden administration official told the AP that the talks were "substantive, serious and direct" and lasted far longer than the two hours that had been planned.

The first in-person meeting between the two countries came just one day after the U.S. announced new sanctions against Beijing for its crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

Officials within the Biden administration said earlier this week that the talks with China come at a time when the U.S. is "in the middle of a pretty extensive China strategy development process."

Biden officials poised to confront China over 'long list' of contentious issues in first face-to-face meeting

  Biden officials poised to confront China over 'long list' of contentious issues in first face-to-face meeting A raft of contentious issues will dominate the Biden administration's first face-to-face meeting with Chinese diplomats, set for Thursday in Alaska.The Biden administration has signaled it will take a hard line when the two sides sit down behind closed doors in Anchorage, Ala., for their first meeting. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Jake Sullivan, Biden's national security adviser, will lead the talks with their Chinese counterparts.

"This is really about having a broader strategic conversation," a senior Biden administration official said. "It's about communicating the areas where we intend to take steps, and it's about understanding where our Chinese interlocutors are at."

Newsweek contacted China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the White House for additional comment but did not hear back in time for publication.

Related Articles

  • Joe Biden Admin Enters War of Words with China, Russia, and North Korea
  • Ted Lieu Touts Rise of Asian American Voters as Trump's 'Kung Flu' Rhetoric Spreads
  • China Media Attacks 'Unreasonable' Tony Blinken after Alaska Meeting
  • China Says It's 'Furious and Sad' Over Anti-Asian Hate Crime Spike in U.S.
  • 30% of Anti-Asian Incidents in 2020 Used Rhetoric Like 'China Virus,' 'Kung Flu,' Report Says
  • Boris Johnson, Jean Castex Signal Support for AstraZeneca Vaccine by Getting Shots Amid Controversy
  • China Blames American Politicians for 'Racism and Hatred' That Prompts Anti-Asian Attacks

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Biden's China Invite Pits Blinken's Tough Strategy Against Kerry's Climate Hopes .
"Despite signals to the contrary this past week, I am optimistic that we will see some cooperative efforts on climate change in the coming months," Joanna Lewis, director of Georgetown University's Science, Technology and International Affairs Program, told Newsweek. "Despite signals to the contrary this past week," she added, "I am optimistic that we will see some cooperative efforts on climate change in the coming months." And there's a lot of work to be done. Among the new president's first international actions after being sworn in office in January was to recommit the U.S.

usr: 2
This is interesting!