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World Britons can be confident in vaccine monitoring, health secretary says

12:20  08 april  2021
12:20  08 april  2021 Source:   reuters.com

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Britons aged 18-29 will be offered an alternative to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine after 79 people developed blood clots within days of getting the jab. There is a possible link between the Oxford vaccine and "extremely rare and unlikely to occur" blood clots with lowered platelets, the Medicines and Healthcare The reassurance that pharmacovigilance in both the United Kingdom & the EU works well. This is important in maintaining confidence in the largest vaccination program in history. As @BorisJohnson has said ; We will follow the advice & are confident in meeting our programme targets.

The UK’s medicines and healthcare regulator has urged people with a history of ‘significant’ allergic reactions not to opt for the Pfizer vaccine , after two NHS medics, vaccinated on Tuesday, experienced severe reactions. Professor Stephen Powis, the national medical director for the NHS in England The NHS said that all hospitals had been informed and would be asking everyone scheduled to receive the vaccine whether they have a history of such reactions. Dr June Raine, the head of the MHRA, told a joint select committee hearing on Wednesday that “real-time vigilance” would continue as the vaccine

LONDON (Reuters) -Britons should be confident that the system to monitor COVID-19 vaccines is working following the change in advice on giving young people the Oxford-AstraZeneca jab, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Thursday.

Matthew Hancock wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Britain's Health Secretary Hancock holds a news conference in London © Reuters/HANNAH MCKAY FILE PHOTO: Britain's Health Secretary Hancock holds a news conference in London

"People can be reassured that we have the high class safety system run by our world class regulator (...) and then we're totally transparent with all of the side effects, no matter how extremely rare they are like these ones," he told Sky News.

Britain's vaccine advisory committee said on Wednesday that an alternative to Oxford-AstraZeneca's vaccine should be given to under 30s where possible due to a "vanishingly" rare side effect of blood clots in the brain.

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Health Secretary Matt Hancock today launched a media blitz to reassure the public over the safety of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine as he insisted 'there is no need' for a drop off in uptake of the jab. Mr Hancock said a decision by UK health chiefs to rule the jab should not be given to Britons under He said that 'people can take confidence that we have a system that we are extremely careful on the safety front' but he insisted that 'when you get the call, get the jab'. The Health Secretary also stressed the decision on the AstraZeneca vaccine will not affect the speed of the nation's vaccination drive

They say some will stay in place until there is a vaccine - which they expect to take 18 months - to prevent infection levels soaring again. Health Secretary Matt Hancock last night admitted the economic impact of the lockdown will cause deaths. As Britons look to return to a more normal way of living, restaurants and pubs are expected to be among the first non-essential services to open but could be made to restrict the number of patrons they let in at once. And football clubs could be forced to maintain low attendances at matches.

Hancock said new guidance would not delay Britain's vaccination programme because alternatives from Pfizer and Moderna would be available for the affected group.


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Britain is aiming to give a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine all over-50s by mid-April and all adults by the end of July.

Hancock said there were 10.16 million people aged between 18 to 29, of whom 1.6 million had already had a first dose of vaccine.

"We have more than enough Pfizer and Moderna vaccines to cover all of the remaining eight and a half million people," he said.

"We are on track to hit the target that we've set that we will ensure every adult in the UK is offered the jab by the end of July."

(Reporting by Paul Sandle and Sarah Young; editing by Costas Pitas and Alistair Smout)

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This is interesting!