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World U.S. Friends Join China in Ripping Japan Plan on Fukushima Water

11:30  13 april  2021
11:30  13 april  2021 Source:   bloomberg.com

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The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Japan . The government has decided to release radioactive water from the plant into the Pacific Ocean.Credit Kota Endo/Kyodo News, via Associated Press. Japan said on Tuesday that it had decided to gradually release tons of treated wastewater from the ruined Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant into the ocean, describing it as the best option for disposal despite fierce opposition from fishing crews at home and concern from governments abroad.

Speaking on Friday, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Japan must adopt “a highly responsible attitude towards its own nationals, neighboring countries and the international community” when considering how to dispose of more than one million tons of radioactive water accumulated at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Zhao called on Tokyo to engage in thorough consultations with neighboring countries and assess the possible impact of dumping the Fukushima nuclear power plant’ s wastewater. Japan must conduct its dealings in an “open and transparent manner,” he added.

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U.S. partners South Korea and Taiwan joined China in opposing Japan’s plan to release more than a million cubic meters of radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant into the Pacific Ocean starting in about two years.

The three Asian governments, all with coastlines nearby, swiftly criticized Japan’s announcement Tuesday that it would conduct controlled releases that are expected to last for several decades. South Korea said they posed a risk to the marine environment and the safety of neighboring countries, while China said it reserved the right to take further action.

Japan to announce Fukushima water release into sea soon

  Japan to announce Fukushima water release into sea soon TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese government has decided to dispose of massive amounts of treated but still radioactive water stored in tanks at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant by releasing it into the Pacific Ocean, local media reported Friday, a conclusion widely expected but delayed for years amid protests and safety concerns. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga told top fisheries association officials on Wednesday that his government believes the release into the sea is the most realistic option and that a final decision would be made “within days.” A formal announcement is expected soon at a meeting of key ministers, Industry Ministry officials said Friday.

Greenpeace Japan said it “strongly condemned” the water ’ s release, which “completely disregards the human rights and interests of the people in Fukushima , wider Japan and the Asia-Pacific region”. “The Japanese government has once again failed the people of Fukushima ,” said Kazue Suzuki, the It has discounted the radiation risks and turned its back on the clear evidence that sufficient storage capacity is available on the nuclear site as well as in surrounding districts. Activists take part in a protest against the Japan government’ s plan to release treated water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear

TOKYO — Japan ’ s government decided Tuesday to start releasing treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years — an option fiercely opposed by fishermen, residents and Japan ’ s neighbors. The decision, long speculated but delayed for years The government stresses the safety of the water by calling it “treated” not “radioactive” even though radionuclides can only be reduced to disposable levels, not to zero. The amount of radioactive materials that would remain in the water is also still unknown. Under the basic plan adopted Tuesday by the

Japan will begin releasing more than a million cubic meters of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant into the Pacific Ocean in about two years, splitting the U.S. from other Asian allies that joined China in condemning the move.

China, South Korea and Taiwan all swiftly issued statements criticizing the controlled releases over the next few decades, with Beijing saying they posed a risk to the marine environment and the safety of neighboring countries.

The U.S., on the other hand, said the approach appeared to be in line with global standards while the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said the global body would help ensure the plan is carried out “without an adverse impact on human health and the environment.”

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Japan plans to release treated radioactive water from Fukushima into the sea in 2 years. Japan ' s government decided Tuesday to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years — an option fiercely opposed by local fishermen and residents. The decision, long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests, came at a meeting of Cabinet ministers who endorsed the ocean release as the best option.

Japan is expected to make a formal decision on Tuesday on disposal of the leaked radioactive water stored in tanks at the crippled Fukushima plant. Beijing has asked Tokyo to take ‘responsible attitude’ to the disposal and called for transparency and consultation with neighbouring countries. A formal decision is expected on Tuesday to gradually release treated water from the damaged nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean.

“Disposing of the treated water is an unavoidable issue for decommissioning the Fukushima nuclear power plant,” Japan Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said.

a large ship in a body of water: Ghost Towns of Fukushima Remain Empty After Decade-Long Rebuild © Bloomberg Ghost Towns of Fukushima Remain Empty After Decade-Long Rebuild

Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant seen from Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture, on March 7.

Photographer: Toru Hanai/Bloomberg

The decision ends years of debate over how to dispose of the water, which is enough to fill more than 500 Olympic-sized swimming pools. It has been leaking into the reactors that suffered core meltdowns after an earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

The U.S. backing comes as Suga prepares to become the first foreign leader to hold an in-person summit with President Joe Biden in Washington ahead of a climate conference, where Japan may announce new 2030 emissions reduction targets. To meet its vow to be carbon neutral by 2050, some government officials contend Japan will need to restart almost every nuclear reactor it shuttered in the aftermath of the 2011 meltdowns, and then build more.

Japan to Dump Treated Radioactive Fukushima Water Into Ocean

  Japan to Dump Treated Radioactive Fukushima Water Into Ocean Japan will release more than a million cubic meters of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government said Tuesday. © Photographer: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: A general view of radiation contaminated water tanks and the damaged reactors at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Five years on, the decontamination and decommissioning process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant continues on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan.

BEIJING ( CHINA DAILY/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – The government of Japan has reportedly decided to release radioactive water accumulated at the now defunct Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, and the decision may be finalized as early as Tuesday (April 13) at a meeting of related ministers. This contaminated water is stored in specially built storage tanks. But the capacity of the containers will be reached next year and there is a plan to remove them to make room for decommissioning operations.

Tanks of water at Fukushima that have been scrubbed of all radioactive materials except mildly [+] radioactive tritium, and which can be slowly released to the ocean with no environmental harm. This despite opposition from fishermen and consumers in neighboring countries such as China and South Korea. The government will hold a meeting of related ministers as early as this week to formally decide on the plan , a major development following over seven years of discussions on how to discharge the water used to cool down melted fuel at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

“We thank Japan for its transparent efforts in its decision to dispose of the treated water from the Fukushima Daiichi site,” U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Twitter.

Discharges are common practice in the industry, and Japan has said the releases will meet global guidelines. A panel within Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry recommended last year the water be released into the ocean or evaporated. The proposal stipulated that any water released into the environment must be re-purified and diluted to meet standards, and that the discharges take place over decades, according to a December 2019 report from METI.

While Tokyo Electric Power Co. Holdings Inc. cycles in water to keep fuel and debris cool at the Fukushima site, fresh groundwater flows in daily and becomes contaminated. That water is pumped out and cleaned in a process that removes most of the radioactive elements except for tritium. Then it’s stored in one of roughly 1,000 tanks at the site, which are forecast to be full by mid-2022.

Read more: Why Japan Is Dumping Water From Fukushima in the Sea: QuickTake

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water to sea in 2 years

  Japan to start releasing Fukushima water to sea in 2 years TOKYO (AP) — Radioactive water accumulating in tanks at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant will be released into the sea in two years after it is treated, Japan's government said Tuesday in a decision long delayed by safety concerns and protests. Cabinet ministers endorsed the release as the best option for handling the massive amount of water that has been stored at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant since the massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011 caused reactor meltdowns and leaks of cooling water from the damaged reactors.

Greenpeace criticized Japan’s plan to release the treated Fukushima water into the ocean and said there are other options that should be considered.

“Rather than using the best available technology to minimize radiation hazards by storing and processing the water over the long term, they have opted for the cheapest option, dumping the water into the Pacific Ocean,” the group said.

The International Atomic Energy Agency said in a report in April 2020 that METI’s recommendations were “based on a sufficiently comprehensive analysis and on a sound scientific and technical basis.”

Taiwan’s Atomic Energy Council expressed regret about the decision, saying it had expressed opposition to the plan earlier. The body in Taipei said it set up 33 monitoring spots in waters nearby Taiwan to assess any impact of radioactivity.

Hu Xijin, an editor at the Communist Party-backed Global Times newspaper, said the U.S. approved of the plan “to cement Japan’s loyalty.”

“The U.S. thinks it’s far from Japan and has the least risk,” he wrote on Twitter. “But ocean currents mean it will face the same risk in future.”

(Updates with details throughout.)

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