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World Obama praises Biden's 'bold leadership' in withdrawing US troops from Afghanistan after nearly 20 years at war

23:20  14 april  2021
23:20  14 april  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

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Barack Obama wearing a suit and tie: President Barack Obama delivers a speech from Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Tuesday, May 2, 2012. AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool © AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool President Barack Obama delivers a speech from Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Tuesday, May 2, 2012. AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool
  • Former President Barack Obama praised Biden for planning to end the US war in Afghanistan.
  • Biden announced that he plans to withdraw all troops in Afghanistan by September 11, 2021.
  • "It is time to recognize that we have accomplished all that we can militarily," Obama said.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Former President Barack Obama on Wednesday praised President Joe Biden's "bold leadership" in taking steps to end the US war in Afghanistan that has drawn out for nearly two decades and spanned multiple administrations.

Why America Can't End Its 'Forever Wars'

  Why America Can't End Its 'Forever Wars' The U.S. military's new way of fighting, developed after two decades at war, traps us in conflicts that last forever.Though the new administration seems intent on ending America's oldest war and there is growing fatigue over endless wars in the Middle East, and though the Pentagon is scrambling to refocus resources and attention away from counterterrorism to big war pursuits against the likes of Russia and China, war isn't going to actually end. That's because there is something about the way the United States fights—about how it has learned to fight in Afghanistan and on other 21st-century battlefields—that facilitates endless war.

Biden plans to withdraw all US forces currently deployed to Afghanistan by September 11, 2021, which will mark 20 years since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

"I am now the fourth American president to preside over an American troop presence in Afghanistan," Biden said in Wednesday remarks in the White House Treaty Room announcing the move, vowing that he "will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth."

Read more: Pasadena-based startup Virtualitics just raised $18 million to help the Pentagon make sure that America stays competitive in AI

Biden said that "while we will not stay involved in Afghanistan militarily, our diplomatic and humanitarian work will continue" to support Afghan security forces and people against the Taliban.

Biden to withdraw all US forces from Afghanistan by Sept. 11

  Biden to withdraw all US forces from Afghanistan by Sept. 11 President Joe Biden will make the announcement on Wednesday, according to a senior administration official. There are roughly 2,500 U.S. troops in Afghanistan now. American troop levels reached a high of 100,000 troops in August 2010 and stayed at that level for much of the next year.

"It has been a long and arduous struggle in Afghanistan, rooted in our response to the deadliest terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland in our history," Obama said, adding that troops and diplomatic workers "can take pride in their efforts to deliver justice for 9/11, destroy al Qaeda's safe-haven, train Afghan Security Forces, and support the people of Afghanistan."

The US' invasion of Afghanistan, then called Operation Enduring Freedom, was launched in October 2001, just weeks after the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. The aim was to destroy the Taliban-aligned terror group behind the attacks, al-Qaeda, and its leader Osama Bin Laden. US forces killed bin Laden in a 2011 strike during Obama's first term in office, but his administration did not succeed in ending the US troop presence in the country.

Currently, the US has approximately 2,500 troops deployed to the country, in addition to troops from the US' allies who belong to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). In all, over 2,300 American service members have died in Afghanistan since the war began in 2001.

US coordinates Afghanistan pullout with NATO withdrawal

  US coordinates Afghanistan pullout with NATO withdrawal BRUSSELS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden’s top national security aides were consulting with NATO on Wednesday to coordinate the alliance’s withdrawal from Afghanistan with the planned pullout of American troops by the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin were meeting senior officials from the alliance’s 30 members on Wednesday to discuss NATO’s future presence in Afghanistan in light of the announcement of the U.S. withdrawal that Biden was to make later in the day.Blinken said that he expected the allies to withdraw together but maintained that neither the U.S.

On Wednesday, NATO announced that they too plan to withdraw their allied forces from Afghanistan alongside the US.

"There will be very difficult challenges and further hardship ahead in Afghanistan, and the U.S. must remain engaged diplomatically and through our development efforts to support the Afghan people, particularly those who have taken extraordinary risks on behalf of human rights," Obama said.

"But after nearly two decades of putting our troops in harm's way," he added, "it is time to recognize that we have accomplished all that we can militarily, and that it's time to bring our remaining troops home."

Read the original article on Business Insider

China Warns Biden Focus on Beijing Challenges Reflects 'Sinister,' 'Deep-Seated Cold War' Mentality .
In withdrawing troops from Afghanistan, Biden said the U.S. needs to focus on challenges that are "in front of us," including China.While former President Donald Trump tried to build a new relationship between the U.S. and China, tensions mounted during his final year in office. Biden taking over has done little to temper heightened emotions and China's regularly issuing warnings to the United States that their rhetoric and actions have consequences.

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