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World Philippine foreign secretary directs unusually aggressive tweet at Beijing over South China Sea

11:05  03 may  2021
11:05  03 may  2021 Source:   msn.com

Philippines Tells China to Back Off Its Exercises in South China Sea, Says There's No Basis to Stop Them

  Philippines Tells China to Back Off Its Exercises in South China Sea, Says There's No Basis to Stop Them "China has no business telling the Philippines what we can and cannot do within our own waters," Philippines Department of National Defense Director Arsenio Andolong said in the statement. "Therefore, it is they who are encroaching and should desist and leave. We will continue to do what is necessary to protect our sovereign rights." The remarks from the Philippines Defense Department come shortly after China's Foreign Ministry responded to the military exercises and called for them to end.

  • Teodoro Locsin Jr., Philippine secretary of foreign affairs, slammed China in a Twitter post as the two countries engage in a war of words over the South China Sea.
  • Locsin asked China to "get the f--- out" and accused Beijing of straining its "friendship" with the Philippines.
  • The Philippines and China have for years made overlapping territorial claims in the South China Sea, a resource-rich waterway where trillions in dollars of global trade pass.
a man in a suit holding a flower: Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Teodoro Locsin speaks at a press conference after meeting Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in Beijing, China on March 20, 2019. © Provided by CNBC Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Teodoro Locsin speaks at a press conference after meeting Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in Beijing, China on March 20, 2019.

Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Teodoro Locsin Jr. slammed China with decidedly undiplomatic language on Twitter Monday, suggesting the Asian giant "get the f--- out" as the two countries engage in a war of words over the South China Sea.

Philippine foreign minister tells China to 'Get the F**k Out' over South China Sea dispute

  Philippine foreign minister tells China to 'Get the F**k Out' over South China Sea dispute The Philippine foreign minister on Monday demanded in an expletive-laced Twitter message that China's vessels get out of disputed waters, the latest exchange in a war of words with Beijing over the South China Sea. © Carlo Gabuco/Bloomberg/FILE Teodoro Locsin, Philippine secretary of foreign affairs, speaks during an interview in Manila, Philippines, in 2019. The comments by Teodoro Locsin, known for blunt remarks, follow Manila's protests for what it calls the "illegal" presence of hundreds of Chinese boats inside the Philippines' 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

Locsin in the tweet accused China of straining its "friendship" with the Philippines. The foreign affairs secretary has been a vocal critic of China in the administration of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, who sought closer ties with Beijing after taking office in 2016.

China's embassy in the Philippine capital of Manila did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for comment.

In response to criticism of his rhetoric made by other Twitter users, Locsin said the "usual suave diplomatic speak gets nothing done."

The Philippines and China have for years contested overlapping territorial claims in the South China Sea, a resource-rich waterway with a total area of about 1.4 million square miles where trillions in dollars of global trade pass. Beijing has in the past year appeared more assertive in the disputed waters.

Beijing responds to U.S. alliances with 'wolf warrior' defiance. Will it backfire?

  Beijing responds to U.S. alliances with 'wolf warrior' defiance. Will it backfire? Beijing's rejection of criticism from America and its friends has grown shriller as the Biden administration demonstrates its ability to pull allies together.Those sentiments, spoken at the U.S.-China meeting in Anchorage last month by Yang Jiechi, the Chinese Communist Party's foreign policy czar, have been repeated incessantly by state media and commercialized by enterprising online sellers. They capture the hubristic defiance that has defined Chinese foreign policy over the last three months as Beijing challenges a Biden administration that is restoring America's global alliances.

Locsin's Monday tweet followed a statement by the Philippine foreign affairs department, which protested the "illegal presence" of Chinese vessels in parts of the South China Sea that are internationally recognized as belonging to the Philippines.

a close up of a map © Provided by CNBC

The statement lashed out at "belligerent actions" by the Chinese coast guard against their Philippine counterparts in the vicinity of Bajo de Masinloc. It said the Chinese had engaged in "shadowing, blocking, dangerous maneuver, and radio challenges" on April 24 to 25.

It also protested the "incessant, illegal, prolonged, and increasing presence of Chinese finishing vessels and maritime militia vessels in Philippine maritime zones."

China 'enjoys sovereignty'

Beijing last week maintained that it "enjoys sovereignty" over Bajo de Masinloc — which it calls Huangyan Island — and its surrounding waters. It urged the Philippines not to escalate disputes.

Bajo de Masinloc, also known as Scarborough Shoal, is a chain of reefs in the South China Sea that lies around 120 nautical miles from the nearest Philippine coast and 470 nautical miles from the nearest coast of China.

China claims most of the South China Sea, based on what it says are nine dashes that delineate Chinese territory in historic maps.

An international tribunal in 2016 dismissed the so-called nine-dash line as legally baseless — a ruling ignored by Beijing.

How to fight China in the South China Sea .
How can the U.S. military best position itself to defeat China in a major conflict in the South or East China Seas? © Provided by Washington Examiner The question deserves keen attention amid escalating tensions between the two superpowers. China claims the near entirety of the South China Sea as its own private swimming pool: a vast area enclosed by Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, and China. This assertion of sovereignty is politically, legally, and geographically absurd.

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