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World North Korea says COVID-19 vaccines are 'no panacea,' warns of lengthy battle

11:40  04 may  2021
11:40  04 may  2021 Source:   reuters.com

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North Korea 's state media warned on Tuesday of the prospect of a lengthy battle against the coronavirus, saying vaccines developed by global drugmakers were proving to be " no universal panacea ". The country has not officially confirmed any infections, although South Korean officials North Korea was expected to receive nearly two million doses of AstraZeneca's COVID - 19 vaccine by the first half of this year, via the COVAX sharing programme. read more. But last month Edwin Salvador, the World Health Organization (WHO) representative for the North , said the shipment was

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By Hyonhee Shin

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People wearing protective face masks commute amid concerns over the new coronavirus disease in Pyongyang, North Korea © Reuters/KYODO Kyodo People wearing protective face masks commute amid concerns over the new coronavirus disease in Pyongyang, North Korea

SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea's state media warned on Tuesday of the prospect of a lengthy battle against the coronavirus, saying vaccines developed by global drugmakers were proving to be "no universal panacea".

The country has not officially confirmed any infections, although South Korean officials have said an outbreak there cannot be ruled out, as the North had trade and people-to-people links with China before shutting its border early last year.

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There are no confirmed cases of COVID - 19 in North Korea . In January 2020, the North Korean government began taking extensive measures to block the outbreak, including quarantine facilities

He says covid - 19 vaccines are “brilliant” medicine and insists they do work on an individual level, but says they are “the wrong weapon” to be deployed on a global scale when high pressures of infectious pathogens are present. As he tweeted on March 3rd, “I am EXTREMELY concerned about the impact current Covid - 19 vaccines will have when increasingly deployed in mass vaccination campaigns conducted in the heat of a pandemic. Read my global WARNING & scientific evidence.”

The Rodong Sinmun, the official newspaper of the ruling Workers' Party, said the pandemic was only worsening, despite the development of vaccines.

"Novel coronavirus vaccines introduced competitively by various countries were once regarded as a glimmer of hope for humanity that could end the fight against this frightening disease," it added.

"But the situations in many countries are clearly proving that the vaccines are never a universal panacea," it said, citing news reports of rising numbers of new cases overseas and safety concerns.

It urged people to brace for a protracted pandemic, describing it as an "inevitable reality" that called for efforts to toughen anti-virus measures and foster loyalty to leader Kim Jong Un and his party.

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The specific and significant COVID - 19 risk of ADE should have been and should be prominently and independently disclosed to research subjects currently in vaccine trials, as well as those being recruited for the trials and future patients after vaccine approval, in order to meet the medical ethics standard RSV is an upper respiratory illness that is very similar to that caused by coronaviruses. At that time, they had decided to skip animal trials and go directly to human trials. “They tested it on I think about 35 children, and the same thing happened,” Kennedy said . “The children developed a champion antibody

People who have received a Covid - 19 vaccine could still pass the virus on to others and should continue following lockdown rules, England's deputy chief medical officer has warned . Writing in the Sunday Telegraph, Prof Jonathan Van-Tam stressed that scientists "do not yet know the impact of the vaccine on transmission". He said vaccines offer "hope" but infection rates must come down quickly. Matt Hancock said 75% of over-80s in the UK have now had a first virus jab. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines require two doses, and figures so far reflect those given the first

North Korea was expected to receive nearly two million doses of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine by the first half of this year, via the COVAX sharing programme.

But last month Edwin Salvador, the World Health Organization (WHO) representative for the North, said the shipment was delayed over supply shortages, citing the GAVI alliance, according to South Korean media.

In a comment to Reuters, Salvador said North Korea was completing technical requirements required to receive the vaccines, but did not elaborate.

The GAVI alliance, which co-leads COVAX with the WHO, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

(Reporting by Hyonhee Shin; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

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