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World Mexico metro overpass collapses, killing 23 and injuring dozens

19:30  04 may  2021
19:30  04 may  2021 Source:   pri.org

Families mourn victims of Mexico City subway collapse

  Families mourn victims of Mexico City subway collapse MEXICO CITY (AP) — José Luis Hernández Martínez crossed Mexico City every day on subway Line 12 between his home on the city’s south side and the body shop where he worked repairing mangled cars. The 61-year-old’s train had emerged from beneath the city and was jostling along the elevated portion far from downtown late Monday night when two of its bright orange cars suddenly fell into a void. Hernández Martínez was killed instantly, his son Luis Adrian Hernández Juarez said, one of 24 people who died in one of the world’s largest subway system’s worst accidents. More than 70 others were injured.

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a group of people standing in front of a building: Mexico City's subway cars lay at an angle after a section of Line 12 of the subway collapsed, May 4, 2021. © Marco Ugarte/AP

Mexico City's subway cars lay at an angle after a section of Line 12 of the subway collapsed, May 4, 2021.

A section of a subway overpass of the Mexico City metro collapsed late Monday night, sending two cars of a passenger train onto traffic on a busy street below. The accident killed at least 23 people while 70 others were injured, and some are in serious condition, according to officials.

The accident in southeast Mexico City, one of the deadliest for the city’s busy subway system, happened on the Golden Line or line 12 inaugurated in 2012.

'No one is going to give me my father back': Families mourn, voice anger after deadly Mexico City metro line crash

  'No one is going to give me my father back': Families mourn, voice anger after deadly Mexico City metro line crash The overpass collapsed late Monday, sending subway cars plunging from Mexico City's newest subway line toward a busy boulevard.The overpass collapsed late Monday, sending subway cars plunging from the city's newest subway line toward a busy boulevard. Rescuers brought in a crane to stabilize the wreckage so they could safely continue the operation.

“A support beam gave way” just as the train passed over it, Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum said, adding that there will be an investigation into the causes of the accident.

The subway system in Mexico City, second-largest in the Americas, transports over 4 million passengers daily. It runs underground through more central areas of the city of 9 million people and on elevated concrete structures on the outskirts.

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Metro overpass in Mexico City collapses, nearly two dozen dead

  Metro overpass in Mexico City collapses, nearly two dozen dead An elevated section of the metro in Mexico City collapsed late Monday. © Provided by Washington Examiner The metro car was sent plunging toward the busy street below around 10:25 p.m. At least 23 people died, and 70 more were injured, authorities said.THREE DEAD AND 27 RESCUED AFTER SUSPECTED SMUGGLING BOAT OVERTURNS OFF SAN DIEGO COAST“A support beam gave way,” as the train passed over it, said Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum, according to the Associated Press. “There are unfortunately children among the dead.

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From The World

The Proud Boys right-wing group disbands in Canada

a group of people standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Organizer Joe Biggs, in a green hat, and Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio, holding a megaphone, march with members of the Proud Boys, and other right-wing demonstrators, across the Hawthorne Bridge during a rally in Portland, Oregon, Aug. 17, 2019. Noah Berger/AP/File photo © Noah Berger/AP/File photo Organizer Joe Biggs, in a green hat, and Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio, holding a megaphone, march with members of the Proud Boys, and other right-wing demonstrators, across the Hawthorne Bridge during a rally in Portland, Oregon, Aug. 17, 2019. Noah Berger/AP/File photo

Photos at the scene of the Mexico City Metro overpass collapse and rescue efforts

  Photos at the scene of the Mexico City Metro overpass collapse and rescue efforts At least 23 people died in an overpass collapse on the Mexico City Metro, which is among the busiest in the world.Rescue workers were still removing bodies from the scene hours after the collapse, but those efforts were suspended early Tuesday because of safety concerns for those working near the precariously dangling car.

In a statement, Proud Boys Canada announced that it was disbanding, and denied being a terrorist or white supremacist group. That announcement came after the Canadian government, in February, became the first country to designate it a terrorist organization.

“For some of [the members], being listed on the same group that lists al-Qaeda or the Islamic State was probably a wake-up call for them, and not something they wanted to be affiliated with,” said Jessica Davis, president of Insight Threat Intelligence, and a former senior strategic analyst with the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service.

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a person riding on the back of a motorcycle: Medical personnel wheel a bed with a coronavirus patient in critical condition as they prepare to transfer the patient by ambulance to a hospital in Aachen, Germany, April 14, 2021. Francisco Seco/AP/File photo © Francisco Seco/AP/File photo Medical personnel wheel a bed with a coronavirus patient in critical condition as they prepare to transfer the patient by ambulance to a hospital in Aachen, Germany, April 14, 2021. Francisco Seco/AP/File photo

Mexico looks for answers after metro train plunges into road, killing 23

  Mexico looks for answers after metro train plunges into road, killing 23 Mexico looks for answers after metro train plunges into road, killing 23MEXICO CITY (Reuters) -A full investigation will be carried out into the causes of an overpass collapse that killed at least 23 people when a Mexico City metro train plunged onto a busy road below, authorities said on Tuesday.

Doctors around the world are working to understand “long COVID” — a lingering range of symptoms that persists in some people after they have initially recovered from COVID-19.

Strange theft of Confederate chair mystifies Alabama town

  Strange theft of Confederate chair mystifies Alabama town SELMA, Ala. (AP) — It’s not the first Confederate monument to go missing in Selma, Alabama, but the story of the stolen Jefferson Davis chair may be the oddest. How to steal a chair that weighed maybe 500 pounds (225 kilograms)? Who was the group “White Lies Matter" that appeared to have stolen the chair to make a statement about how we remember the Confederacy? What of the ransom demand that didn't ask for money, but included threats of a scatological nature? And how did the chair end up 300 miles (480 kilometers) away in New Orleans? © Provided by Associated Press A plaque commemorates where a chair carved out of limestone honoring Confederate President Jefferson

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