•   
  •   
  •   

World Pentagon Can’t Say When, Where Chinese Rocket Will Crash Into Earth

01:05  06 may  2021
01:05  06 may  2021 Source:   usnews.com

China launches main part of its 1st permanent space station

  China launches main part of its 1st permanent space station BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday launched the main module of its first permanent space station that will host astronauts long term, the latest success for a program that has realized a number of its growing ambitions in recent years. The Tianhe, or “Heavenly Harmony," module blasted into space atop a Long March 5B rocket from the Wenchang Launch Center on the southern island province of Hainan, marking another major advance for the country’s space exploration. © Provided by Associated Press In this image taken from undated video footage run by China's CCTV via AP Video, a rendering of a module of a Chinese space station is shown.

The Pentagon has just announced that a Chinese rocket is now expected to crash into earth . An astrophysicist argues that people shouldn' t worry. The particular Chinese Long March 5B rocket is now expected to reenter Earth 's own atmosphere at an estimated date of May 8. The thing is, as of the moment, nobody knows where the rocket will crash .

The Pentagon and US Space Command are said to be tracking a large Chinese rocket which is set to reenter Earth 's atmosphere at some point this coming weekend , likely "around May 8th" according to the latest DoD statement. US Defense Department spokesman Mike Howard issued to following details in a Tuesday statement : The rocket 's "exact entry point into the Earth 's atmosphere" can ' t be pinpointed until within hours of reentry, Howard said , but the 18th Space Control Squadron will provide daily updates on the rocket 's location through the Space Track website .

The Pentagon on Wednesday said it does not know where a Chinese rocket will come crashing to Earth, three days before its expected reentry.

a group of people standing in front of a large crowd of people: TOPSHOT - People watch a Long March 5B rocket, carrying China's Tianhe space station core module, as it lifts off from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in southern China's Hainan province on April 29, 2021. - China OUT (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images) © (STR/AFP via Getty Images) TOPSHOT - People watch a Long March 5B rocket, carrying China's Tianhe space station core module, as it lifts off from the Wenchang Space Launch Center in southern China's Hainan province on April 29, 2021. - China OUT (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

"It's too soon to know exactly where it's going to come down," Defense Department spokesman John Kirby said of the huge Long March 5B rocket, which launched China's first permanent space station into orbit. U.S. Space Command assesses "almost the entire body of the rocket" remains intact, Kirby said, and that it will return to Earth "somewhere around the 8th of May.'

The Pentagon is tracking an out of control Chinese rocket expected to crash into Earth

  The Pentagon is tracking an out of control Chinese rocket expected to crash into Earth The Chinese Long March 5B rocket is expected to reenter Earth's atmosphere around May 8. No one knows where. But don't panic!The Chinese Long March 5B rocket launched Tianhe, the core module of the Chinese Space Station.

In the meantime, the spokesman said the squadron would provide daily updates on the rocket and its location through a special website. The craft was sent into orbit late last month, embarking on an 18-month project to construct China ’s first-ever space station. The successful April 30 launch put the While the 22-ton rocket stage detached from the Tianhe module as intended, it was unable to maneuver into a safe deorbiting path for a controlled reentry. The uncertain trajectory of the rocket was reported within hours of the launch, though the Pentagon only acknowledged the matter on Tuesday

The Pentagon said it is tracking China ’s Long March 5 rocket , which is out of control and will re-enter the Earth ’s atmosphere this weekend. China ’s Long March 5B rocket core carried the country’s space station “core module” into low earth orbit last week. However, after the mission is completed, the rocket appears to have fallen into orbit where it can be seen plunging towards Earth . This was when some Western experts expressed concern about the secret ambitions behind the construction of a Chinese base and the triggering of a new “space race.”

"It's also too soon to explore options about what, if anything, can be done about this until we have a better sense of where it's coming down," Kirby said, confirming a prior statement from Space Command that it would only have a few hours' notice once it determines the rocket's return trajectory. "I don't want to hypothesize or speculate about possible actions the department might or might not take here. We're tracking it, we're following it as closely as we can. It's just a little too soon to know where it's going to go or what, if anything, can be done about that."

China through its state media on Wednesday blasted "Western hype of the 'China threat' in space technology advancement," citing civilian experts who believe it is "completely normal" for rocket debris to return to Earth and that it will "likely fall in international waters," offering no official assessment of the potential dangers.

Portion of Chinese Rocket Expected to Hit Earth Saturday, but Where Is a Mystery

  Portion of Chinese Rocket Expected to Hit Earth Saturday, but Where Is a Mystery U.S. officials said the location can only be pinpointed within hours of reentry, but other experts said the impact will be minimal.The Long March 5B rocket carried the main module of Tianhe, or Heavenly Harmony, China's first permanent space station into orbit on April 29.

The Pentagon says it is tracking the trajectory of the Chinese Long March 5B rocket , which is expected to reenter the Earth 's atmosphere on May 10. That's plus or minus two days so it could happen as early as May 8 or as late as May 12. The Long March 5B's 30-metre (98.4-foot) high core launched the Tianhe or "Heavenly Harmony" unmanned module into low Earth orbit last week. It's the first module of China 's space station that's expected to be fully operational by 2022.

The Pentagon has said it is tracking a large Chinese rocket that is out of control and set to reenter Earth 's atmosphere this weekend, raising concerns about where its debris may make impact. The Chinese Long March 5B rocket is expected to enter Earth 's atmosphere "around May 8," according to a statement from Defense Department spokesperson Mike Howard, who said the US Space Command is tracking the rocket 's trajectory. The rocket 's "exact entry point into the Earth 's atmosphere" can ' t be pinpointed until within hours of reentry, Howard said , but the 18th Space Control Squadron will

The risk of this falling space debris, however, has raised alarm among many analysts.

"This is not unique. Things come down. What's unique about this is it's so large, and the Chinese did nothing to try to control its reentry or mitigate risk," Todd Harrison, director of the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells U.S. News. "This is evidence that they are a junior space power that hasn't really figured out how to operate safely and responsibly."

Beijing's space agency as of Tuesday had not stated whether it believed the "core stage" of the huge rocket is being controlled during its descent – a common practice among space-faring countries that allows refuse to burn up in the atmosphere – or if it didn't know how the rocket would fall.

American officials have previously slammed Chinese behavior in space as the burgeoning superpower expands its celestial exploration. In 2007, it tested an anti-satellite missile and successfully destroyed one of its orbiting weather satellites – a message to the world of its new capabilities and a grave concern to Western powers. Incidents like those are allowed, in part, due to relatively few international laws or rules governing space operations.

The US has no plans to shoot down the Chinese rocket due to crash down this weekend, defense secretary says

  The US has no plans to shoot down the Chinese rocket due to crash down this weekend, defense secretary says The Long March 5B rocket took off from China on April 29, and a big chunk is now heading toward Earth uncontrolled.Austin told reporters: "We have the capability to do a lot of things, but we don't have a plan to shoot it down as we speak," The Guardian reported.

The Pentagon has said it is tracking a large Chinese rocket that is out of control and set to re-enter Earth 's atmosphere this weekend, raising concerns about where its debris may make impact. The rocket 's "exact entry point into the Earth 's atmosphere" can ' t be pinpointed until within hours of re-entry, Howard said , but the 18th Space Control Squadron will provide daily updates on the rocket 's location through the Space Track website. The rocket was used by the Chinese to launch part of their space station last week.

Howard said the rocket ’s exact entry point won’ t be known until within hours of reentry, but that daily updates on its location will be provided at the Space Track website. Aerospace.org is also tracking the rocket , and as of Tuesday evening, was predicting a May 8 arrival, around 9:30 p.m. PT — though But don’ t panic. Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Astrophysics Center at Harvard University, told CNN, “the risk that it will hit you is incredibly tiny. And so I would not lose one second of sleep over this.” Because the Pacific Ocean covers so much of the Earth , the debris will likely splash down in

More recently, an 18-ton Chinese rocket fell uncontrolled into the Atlantic Ocean in May near the coast of West Africa, marking the largest piece of space debris to fall to earth since the Soviet space station Salyut 7 in 1991. The latest rocket is even bigger at 100 feet long.

China's first space station in 2016 crashed into the Pacific Ocean after officials confirmed they had lost control of it. Three years later, China executed a controlled demolition of its second station, Tiangong-2, in Earth's atmosphere.

It remains unclear whether international condemnation at this latest incident will change China's behavior. Beijing has not engaged in similar anti-satellite operations following near universal outrage at its 2007 test, Harrison notes.

And as for the risk of going outside on Saturday, he adds, "none at all."

"The odds of it hitting you are trivial," Harrison says.

Copyright 2021 U.S. News & World Report

After days of uncertainty, Chinese rocket reenters atmosphere over Indian Ocean .
The U.S. Space Command said it could confirm that the rocket reentered over the Arabian Peninsula at about 10:15 p.m. EDT.The U.S. Space Command said it could confirm that the rocket reentered over the Arabian Peninsula at about 10:15 p.m. EDT, but that "it is unknown if the debris impacted land or water.

usr: 6
This is interesting!