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World NATO chief arrives in Washington looking ahead toward Russia and China, away from Afghanistan

15:11  07 june  2021
15:11  07 june  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

NATO Officials Say Ongoing War Games in Black Sea Aren't Aimed At Russia

  NATO Officials Say Ongoing War Games in Black Sea Aren't Aimed At Russia Russia's increased military presence at the Ukraine border has raised concerns for NATO, but the military organization denied recent exercises are aimed at Russia.The war games are being referred to as Steadfast Defender 21, and are a test of NATO's military response to an attack on any one of its 30 member states, the Associated Press reported. The main focus of the exercises now is testing NATO's ability to deploy troops from America and maintain open supply lines.

AFGHANISTAN IN REARVIEW MIRROR: NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg is in Washington today to meet with President Joe Biden and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin ahead of next week’s summit of alliance leaders in Brussels.

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With the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO forces from Afghanistan expected to pass the halfway mark this week (the U.S. Central Command will release a new, updated percentage tomorrow), the pace the troop exit is ahead of schedule and on track to be completed well before the Sept. 11 deadline set by Biden.

But the focus of next Monday’s summit is not the worsening level of violence in Afghanistan or the inability of the Afghan government forces to blunt an intensifying Taliban offensive, but rather reflects a clear desire by the alliance to put the mission in Afghanistan behind it and look ahead toward countering Russia and China.

NATO chief says Afghan exit going well as 10 die in attacks

  NATO chief says Afghan exit going well as 10 die in attacks BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO's Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said the military organization’s pullout from Afghanistan is going well, as at least six people were killed Tuesday in a series of attacks that plunged the country's capital, Kabul, into darkness. NATO has helped provide security in Afghanistan for almost two decades, but it now believes the government and armed forces it has trained are strong enough to stand on their own in the conflict-torn country without the help of international troops.NATO took charge of security efforts in Afghanistan in 2003, two years after a U.S.

In a speech in Brussels Friday, Stoltenberg mentioned Afghanistan only once in passing and wasn’t asked a single question about the withdrawal in the Q&A session that followed. Stoltenberg meets with Austin at 11 a.m. at the Pentagon and Biden at the White House at 4:30 p.m. The White House said the two would discuss “many issues on the NATO agenda, including reinforcing transatlantic security in the face of challenges from Russia and China.”

In an op-ed outlining his goals for his European trip and meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Biden talked about rallying democracies, but like Stoltenberg, made no mention of Afghanistan.

DIRE PREDICTIONS COMING TRUE: Meanwhile, the Taliban has taken control of seven district centers in four different regions of Afghanistan over the past week, according to the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies’s Long War Journal, whose tracking map shows the Afghan government in control of only a small part of the country in the center, surrounded by districts either contested on controlled by the Taliban.

It's time for Biden to shut NATO's doors

  It's time for Biden to shut NATO's doors It would be a major mistake if Biden and his NATO colleagues simply wax philosophically and avoid making the real changes that NATO needs.The NATO summit will have special resonance for Biden, who entered office promising to improve Washington's relations with allies in Europe and bring the military alliance back to the center of US foreign policy.

“The Afghan security forces have been under heavy pressure since the Taliban renewed its efforts to retake districts after the U.S. began its withdraw from Afghanistan in May. U.S. airpower is no longer assisting Afghan forces in repelling major Taliban attacks,” writes Bill Roggio, an FDD senior fellow. “The Taliban has stepped up pressure in all regions of the country.”

A United Nations report released last week laid out the situation in blunt terms. “The Taliban’s messaging remains uncompromising, and it shows no sign of reducing the level of violence in Afghanistan to facilitate peace negotiations with the Government of Afghanistan and other Afghan stakeholders,” the June 1 report concludes. “The Taliban’s intent appears to be to continue to strengthen its military position as leverage. It believes that it can achieve almost all of its objectives by negotiation or, if necessary, by force.”

Some US allies near Russia are wary of Biden-Putin summit

  Some US allies near Russia are wary of Biden-Putin summit KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Central and Eastern European nations are anxious about the coming summit meeting between U.S. President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, wary of what they see as hostile intentions from the Kremlin. Some in the countries that once were part of the Soviet Union or the Moscow-led Warsaw Pact during the Cold War worry that Washington could scale down support for its allies in the region in a bid to secure a more stable and predictable relationship with Russia.

US SAYS IT’S NOT ABANDONING AFGHANS: The State Department dispatched a delegation headed by U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad to Doha and Kabul over the weekend to meet with the key players to both try to re-energize the stalled peace process and reassure Afghan leaders of the continued U.S. financial support.

In a tweet following his meeting with Khalilzad, Abdullah Abdullah, chairman of the Afghan High Council for Reconciliation, offered perfunctory thanks to the U.S. and the allies, but in an interview with the Washington Post last month, he was more candid about his disappointment with the speed of the U.S. withdrawal.

“That the U.S. would withdraw sooner or later, we had no doubt,” he told the Washington Post’s Lally Weymouth, noting that with the U.S. packing up to leave, the Taliban have only been emboldened. “So far the Taliban has not been serious in their negotiations,” he said. “Perhaps there are groups among the Taliban that think a military takeover may be possible. They haven’t said it explicitly, but that’s their attitude. They have not fulfilled their commitment about reducing violence nor de-linking with al Qaeda.”

Biden at NATO for bridge building after Trump mocked alliance as 'obsolete'

  Biden at NATO for bridge building after Trump mocked alliance as 'obsolete' Biden is attending his first NATO meeting as president, aiming to build bridges after Trump berated allies as 'deadbeats' and belittled the alliance.The only time that the Article 5 provision was invoked was when NATO member states rushed to support the United States after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. But Trump, who once branded NATO "obsolete," wondered out loud why he should send U.S. troops to defend countries he apparently had barely heard of.

“A Taliban takeover will not happen,” he predicted. “Our priority is to make peace. If the Taliban insists on a violent takeover, they will face not just the Afghan security and defense forces, but also the Afghan people. People don’t want the Taliban. Ask people who have experienced their rule.”

So far, the U.S. has offered no plan to replace the departing U.S. contractors vital to keeping the Afghan military going or to evacuate Afghan translators and others who worked for the U.S. and could face retaliation from the Taliban.

“As Afghans look for visible signs that Biden’s promised support will continue, what they see is a rush to the door — and silence about the details that would make the promises real,” writes Ronald Neumann, a former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, in an op-ed this morning

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Good Monday morning and welcome to Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense, written and compiled by Washington Examiner National Security Senior Writer Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) and edited by Victor I. Nava. Email here with tips, suggestions, calendar items, and anything else. Sign up or read current and back issues at DailyonDefense.com. If signing up doesn’t work, shoot us an email and we’ll add you to our list. And be sure to follow us on Twitter: @dailyondefense.

How NATO is updating its common defense pact to deal with global cyberattacks

  How NATO is updating its common defense pact to deal with global cyberattacks President Joe Biden from Brussels called NATO's Article 5 a "sacred obligation" on Monday, the same day the organization updated how it will respond to cyberattacks. Amid the growing cyber threat, Biden on Monday called NATO's Article 5 "a sacred obligation" that is "rock solid and unshakable.

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HAPPENING TODAY: On Capitol Hill, Secretary of State Antony Blinken has back-to-back hearings on the State Department’s 2022 budget, as well as a third hearing tomorrow morning. Blinken’s testimony had to be rescheduled because of his travel schedule in late May.

This morning, he appears before the House Foreign Affairs Committee at 10 a.m. and then before the House Appropriations State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Subcommittee at 2:30 p.m. Tomorrow, he’s scheduled to testify before the Senate Appropriations Committee at 10 a.m.

ALSO TODAY: U.S. Central Commander Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie will discuss “the safe and deliberate withdrawal from Afghanistan, deterring Iran’s destabilizing activities, China and Russia’s influence in the region, and the defeat-ISIS campaign in Iraq and Syria,” a conference call briefing for reporters run out of the State Department’s Dubai Regional Media Hub.

The Dubai Regional Media Hub is a State Department effort to build relations with media outlets throughout the Arab world through interviews and social media, so McKenzie’s remarks will include a separate simultaneous Arabic translation.

OUR MAN IN UKRAINE: The Washington Examiner’s intrepid defense reporter Abraham Mahshie has been reporting from Ukraine the past few days.

Biden looks to ease EU trade tensions ahead of Putin summit

  Biden looks to ease EU trade tensions ahead of Putin summit BRUSSELS (AP) — President Joe Biden is seeking to tamp down trade tensions with European allies as he spends one last day consulting with western democracies ahead of his highly anticipated meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. After a pair of summits with Group of Seven world leaders in the U.K. and then NATO allies in Brussels, Biden meets Tuesday with European Council President Charles Michel and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen. The president has sought to marshal widespread European support for his efforts to counter Russia prior to his Wednesday meeting in Geneva with Putin. But the U.S.-EU relationship is not without some tensions.

Among his dispatches is an account of how Ukraine, with U.S. help, is rebuilding its navy after losing ships and port facilities to Russia when Vladimir Putin seized Crimea in 2014.

“Ukraine is reconstituting its navy in order to patrol its coastlines and help counter Russia’s increased military presence in the Black Sea and the tiny Sea of Azov closed in by Crimea, Ukraine, and Russia,” Mahshie reports. “The 1936 Montreux Convention limits the presence of foreign navies in the Black Sea, meaning U.S. vessels must rotate out every two weeks to maintain a presence. But Black Sea nations can patrol as they wish.”

“We lost Crimea temporarily, but we lost it,” Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba told Mahshie in an exclusive interview in Kyiv. “We are heavily investing in basically the creation of a new Ukrainian navy.”

The U.S. is donating five P-190 Sloviansk island-class patrol vessels and eight Mark VI patrol boats to a fledgling Ukrainian navy of no more than 30 ships.

READ MORE: US HELPS UKRAINE FEND OFF RUSSIA IN BLACK SEA AFTER MOST OF FLEET WAS CAPTURED WITH CRIMEA

ON THE FRONT LINES: From the capital Kyiv, Mahshie traveled to the Shyrokyne Village, which is along the front line separating Ukraine forces and Russian-backed rebels.

Mahshie interviewed the soldiers manning muddy trenches and subject to shelling as soon as night falls.

“Mud pools below the wooden pallet walkways in the narrow, dark network of tunnels. This is where the soldiers live. And this is where they hunker down when the shelling starts after dark — and European peace monitors are out of sight,” Mahshie reports. “These positions are shelled two to three times a week. Soldiers die, casualties continue.”

“Anybody would be scared. Only a stupid person wouldn’t,” a Ukrainian army officer tells Mahshie. “Nothing is hard for me to get used to. I have known since childhood what military service is,” he said of life in the trenches. “I like to serve.”

A sense of relief over 'dear Joe' and post-Trump summit era

  A sense of relief over 'dear Joe' and post-Trump summit era BRUSSELS (AP) — Over the four years of Donald Trump's presidency and through the seeming eternity of pandemic misery and isolation, America’s partners in world affairs were waiting to exhale. As they cycled through Group of Seven, NATO and European Union summits over the last week, exhale they did, between bites of haggis mousse, pineapple weed and Dover sole. President Joe Biden — “dear Joe” to the European Commission's chief — engaged fellowAs they cycled through Group of Seven, NATO and European Union summits over the last week, exhale they did, between bites of haggis mousse, pineapple weed and Dover sole.

READ MORE: TRENCH WARFARE: ON THE EASTERN UKRAINE FRONT LINE AS CONFLICT WITH RUSSIA RAGES

CONFRONTING PUTIN: In his op-ed published this morning in the Washington Post, President Joe Biden said he will seek a “stable and predictable relationship” with Russia when he meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva, but that he will also “not hesitate to respond” to future harmful activities from Moscow.

“We are standing united to address Russia’s challenges to European security, starting with its aggression in Ukraine, and there will be no doubt about the resolve of the United States to defend our democratic values, which we cannot separate from our interests,” Biden writes.

“In my phone calls with President Putin, I have been clear and direct. The United States does not seek conflict,” he said. “At the same time, I have also imposed meaningful consequences for behaviors that violate U.S. sovereignty, including interference in our democratic elections … When we meet, I will again underscore the commitment of the United States, Europe and like-minded democracies to stand up for human rights and dignity.”

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The Rundown

Washington Examiner: Trench warfare: On the eastern Ukraine front line as conflict with Russia rages

Washington Examiner: Russia stirs ethnic divisions in Ukraine in hopes of triggering civil war, says foreign minister

Washington Examiner: US helps Ukraine fend off Russia in Black Sea after most of fleet was captured with Crimea

Washington Examiner: China to 'welcome the Taliban back' in bid to extend Belt and Road into Afghanistan

Washington Examiner: US general: China's Xi Jinping wants to rule the world as 'only' superpower, surrounded by 'vassal states'

Washington Examiner: DOJ to end practice of seeking court orders for reporter records in leak investigations

Reuters: Putin says Nord Stream 2 gas link to be finished as U.S. seeks good European ties

Washington Times: Biden Not Seeking To Add Countries To Quad To Counter China

AP: High court asked to review men-only draft registration law

New York Times: C.I.A. Scrambles for New Approach in Afghanistan

AP: Amid brutal case surge, Afghanistan hit by a vaccine delay

Reuters: U.S. boosts Taiwan's COVID-19 fight with vaccines as senators visit

Bloomberg: China Faces Nationalist Anger Over U.S. Military Plane In Taiwan

The Drive: Close-Up Photo Shows China’s New Aircraft Carrier Rapidly Taking Shape

AIr Force Magazine: Ray: B-21 Program Structure Keeps it On-Track and On-Cost

Defense One: Where the US Army’s Cut List and Wish List Overlap

Air Force Magazine: Space Force Wants Extra $832 Million for Unfunded Priorities

Air Force Magazine: ‘Rocket Cargo’ Becomes Latest Vanguard Project to Get Priority from Air Force

AP: U.S. Intel Report On UFOs: No Evidence Of Aliens, But. ...

USNI News: U.S. Working to Dampen Chinese Missile Advantage in the Pacific

Marine Corps Times: A Marine Fight In The Arctic May Look Like This

Stars and Stripes: The Marine Corps Has Pinned Wings On One Of Its Last Hornet Fighter Jet ‘Back-Seaters’

The Hill: Pentagon To Keep Ban On Pride, Most Other Flags From Being Flown On Military Installations

AP: Normandy commemorates D-Day with small crowds, but big heart

AP: Last of Soviet soldiers who liberated Auschwitz dies at 98

Washington Post: Opinion: The confusion of a rushed U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan could lead to disaster

Forbes: Opinion: When It Comes To Weapons, The Biden Administration’s Budget Is Just Like Trump’s

Calendar

MONDAY | JUNE 7

10 a.m. — House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on "The State Department's Foreign Policy Strategy and FY2022 Budget Request,” with Secretary of State Antony Blinken. http://foreignaffairs.house.gov

11 a.m. Pentagon River Entrance — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin hosts honor cordon to welcome NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg to the Pentagon.

11 a.m. — U.S. Central Commander Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie conducts a telephonic press conference for international reporters to discuss “the safe and deliberate withdrawal from Afghanistan, deterring Iran’s destabilizing activities, China and Russia’s influence in the region, and the defeat-ISIS campaign in Iraq and Syria.” Sponsored by the U.S. State Department. Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/briefing

1 p.m. — NDIA Emerging Technologies Institute virtual workshop: “The Modernization Quandary," with Mark Lewis, executive director of the Emerging Technologies Institute; retired Gen. Hawk Carlisle, president and CEO, National Defense Industrial Association; James Geurts, performing the duties of undersecretary of the Navy; Nicole Petta, assistant director for microelectronics, Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering; Katherina McFarland, former assistant secretary of defense, acquisition, and acting assistant secretary of the army for acquisition, logistics and technology; and Al Shaffer, former deputy undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment

2:30 p.m. — House Appropriations State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Subcommittee hearing on "Department of State and Related Programs FY2022 Budget Request,” with Secretary of State Antony Blinken. http://appropriations.house.gov

3 p.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces hearing: “Fiscal Year 2022 Army and Marine Corps Ground Systems Modernization Programs,” with Douglas Bush, acting assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition, logistics and technology; Gen. John Murray, commanding general, Army Futures Command; Frederick “Jay” Stefany, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition; and Lt.  Gen. Eric Smith, commanding general., Marine Corps Combat Development Command and deputy commandant for combat development and integration. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

4 p.m. — Center for Strategic and International Studies conference call briefing: "Previewing the G7 and NATO Summits,” with Heather Conley, director of the CSIS Europe, Russia, and Eurasia Program; Rachel Ellehuus, deputy director of the CSIS Europe, Russia, and Eurasia Program; Matthew Goodman, CSIS senior vice president for economics; and Michael Green, CSIS senior vice president for Asia. https://www.csis.org/events/press-briefing

TUESDAY | JUNE 8

9 a.m. — American University holds a virtual media briefing on the first Biden-Putin meeting and the upcoming NATO, U.S.-EU and G-7 summits, with James Goldgeier, member of the State Department's Historical Advisory Committee, professor at the AU School of International Service and senior visiting fellow at the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution; Ghiyath Nakshbendi, senior professorial lecturer at the AU Kogod School of Business; Michelle Egan, professor at the AU School of International Service and co-director of SIS's Transatlantic Policy Center; and Garret Martin, professorial lecturer and co-director of SIS's Transatlantic Policy Center https://american.zoom.us

9:30 a.m. G50 Dirksen — Senate Armed Services Committee hearing; “The United States’ strategic competition with China,” with Matt Pottinger, former assistant to the president and deputy national security adviser; distinguished visiting fellow, The Hoover Institution Stanford University; Evan Medeiros, distinguished fellow, U.S.-China studies Georgetown University; Sheena Chestnut Greitens, associate professor, University of Texas at Austin; and Bonnie Glaser, director, Asia Program, German Marshall Fund of the United States. https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

9:30 a.m. — German Marshall Fund of the United States virtual discussion; “Priorities for a U.S.-EU Summit,” with Acting Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Philip Reeker; EU Ambassador to the United States Stavros Lambrinidis; and Ian Lesser, vice president and executive director of GMFUS Brussels. https://www.gmfus.org/events/priorities-us-eu-summit

10 a.m. 106 Dirksen — Senate Appropriations Committee hearing: “A Review of the FY22 State Department Budget Request,” with Secretary of State Antony Blinken. https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/hearings

10 a.m. — Woodrow Wilson Center Global Europe Program and Kennan Institute virtual discussion: “Biden's First International Trip: Expectations and Realities,” with Daniel Hamilton, fellow at the Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation; and Matthew Rojansky, director of the WWC Kennan Institute. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event

11 a.m. — Center for a New American Security National Security Conference, with Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks; and Richard Fontaine, CEO, CNAS. https://www.cnas.org/2021-conference-registration

11 a.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces hearing: “Air Force Projection Forces Aviation Programs and Capabilities Related to the 2022 President’s Budget Request,” with Darlene Costello, acting assistant secretary of the Air Force, acquisition, technologies and logistics; Lt.  Gen. David Nahom, deputy chief of staff plans and programs; and Lt. Gen. S. Clinton Hinote, deputy chief of staff strategy, integration and requirements. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

11 a.m. — SETA Foundation at Washington D.C. virtual discussion: “U.S.-Turkey Relations: Previewing the Biden-Erdogan Meeting at NATO,” with Luke Coffey, director of the Heritage Foundation's Center for Foreign Policy; Burhanettin Duran, general coordinator at SETA; and Kilic Kanat, research director at SETA. https://setadc.org/events/u-s-turkey-relations

11 a.m. — United States Institute of Peace virtual discussion: “The Resurgence of the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan,” with Amira Jadoon, assistant professor at West Point's Combating Terrorism Center; Asfandyar Mir, postdoctoral teaching fellow at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation; Tricia Bacon, assistant professor at American University's School of Public Affairs; and Tamanna Salikuddin, director of South Asia programs at USIP https://www.usip.org/events/resurgence-tehrik-i-taliban-pakistan

1 p.m. — American Bar Association virtual discussion: “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Military: Racial Disparity in the Services,” with Col. Christopher Shaw, staff judge advocate at the Marine Corps Combat Development Command; retired Col. Will Gunn, principal at W. Gunn Consulting Services; Rachel VanLandingham, Law professor at Southwestern Law School; and Patricia Harris, member of the ABA Standing Committee on Armed Forces Law. https://americanbar.zoom.us/webinar/register

1:30 p.m. Pentagon Briefing Room — Army Gen. Daniel Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau, briefs reporters on the states of the Guard

2 p.m. — Senate Appropriations Defense Subcommittee hearing: “Air Force and Space Force Budget,” with John Roth, acting Air Force Secretary; Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr., Air Force chief of staff; Gen. John Raymond, chief of space operations. https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/hearings/air-force-and-space-force-budget

2 p.m. — Association of the U.S. Army’s Thought Leaders webinar, with retired Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges to discuss his new book, Future War and the Defence of Europe. https://info.ausa.org

2:30 p.m. 222 Russell — Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower hearing “Navy and Marine Corps investment programs in review of the Defense Authorization Request for Fiscal Year 2022,” with Lt. Gen. Eric Smith, deputy commandant for combat development and integration; Vice Adm. James Kilby, deputy chief of naval operations for warfighting requirements and capabilities; and Frederick Stefany, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition. https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

3:30 p.m. — Washington Post Live virtual discussion: “UFOs and National Security,” with Luis "Lue" Elizondo, former director of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. https://www.washingtonpost.com/washington-post-live

WEDNESDAY | JUNE 9

All Day — President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden travel to the United Kingdom for Biden’s first overseas trip.

10 a.m. 192 Dirksen — Senate Appropriations Committee Subcommittee hearing: “A Review of the Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Submission for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Bureau of Reclamation,” with Jamie Pinkham, acting assistant secretary Army (civil works); Lt. Gen. Scott Spellmon, chief of engineers and commanding general, David Palumbo, deputy commissioner of operations, Bureau of Reclamation. https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/hearings

10 a.m. — Middle East Institute virtual Cyber Conference, with pre-recorded remarks from Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va. https://www.mei.edu/events/meis-second-annual-cyber-conference

12:15 p.m. — New America virtual discussion: “Bringing Americans Home 2021: A Non-Governmental Assessment of U.S. Hostage Policy and Family Engagement,” with former Acting Secretary of Defense Christopher Miller; and State Department Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs Roger Carstens. https://www.newamerica.org/international-security/events

2:15 p.m. — Atlantic Council virtual discussion: “Competition and Deterrence in Europe,” with Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, commander of U.S. European Command and Supreme Allied Commander Europe. https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event

3 p.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness hearing: “Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for Military Readiness, with Gen. Joseph Martin, vice chief of staff of the Army; Adm. William Lescher, vice chief of naval operations; Gen. David Allvin, vice chief of staff of the Air Force; Gen. Gary Thomas, assistant commandant of the Marine Corps; and Gen. David Thompson, vice chief of staff space operations. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

3 p.m. — American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research web event, “Transforming the U.S. Army,” with Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville; Gen. John Murray, commander, Army Futures Command; and Mackenzie Eaglen, Resident Fellow, AEI. https://www.aei.org/events/transforming-the-us-army

4:30 p.m. 232A Russell — Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces hearing: “Missile defense strategy, policies, and programs in review of the Defense Authorization Request for fiscal year 2022 and the Future Years Defense Program,” with Vice Adm. Jon Hill, director Missile Defense Agency; Lt. Gen. Daniel Karbler, commander U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Joint Functional Component Command For Integrated Missile Defense; Gen. Glen VanHerck, commander United States Northern Command and North American Aerospace Defense Command; Leonor Tomero, deputy assistant secretary of defense for nuclear and missile defense policy; Ankit Panda, senior fellow, Nuclear Policy Program Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; Robert Soofer, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for nuclear and missile defense policy. https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

THURSDAY | JUNE 10

TBA — President Joe Biden meets with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson during his visit to the United Kingdom.

9:30 a.m. G50 Dirksen — Senate Armed Services Committee hearing: “Department of Defense budget posture in review of the Defense Authorization Request for Fiscal Year 2022, with Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin; Gen. Mark Milley; and Michael McCord, undersecretary of defense (comptroller). https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

11 a.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces hearing: “FY22 Budget Request for Nuclear Forces and Atomic Energy Defense Activities,” with Melissa Dalton, acting assistant secretary of defense for strategy, plans, and capabilities; Charlie Verdon, acting administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration; Vice Adm. Johnny Wolfe, director, Strategic Systems Programs; and Air Force Lt. Gen. James Dawkins, deputy chief of staff for strategic deterrence and nuclear integration. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

11 a.m. — Center for a New American Security National Security Conference panel: “Protecting Democracy, Protecting National Security,” with Rep. Peter Meijer R-Minn; Rep. Elissa Slotkin, D-Mich; Carrie Cordero, CNAS senior fellow, and Jonathan Swan, Axios national political correspondent. https://www.cnas.org/2021-conference-registration

12 p.m. — McCain Institute virtual book discussion on "The Kill Chain: Defending America in the Future of High-Tech Warfare,” with author Christian Brose, head of strategy at Anduril Industries; and former National Counterterrorism Center Director Nicholas Rasmussen, executive director of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/authors-insights

FRIDAY | JUNE 11

All Day — President Joe Biden attends the G7 Summit in Cornwall, U.K., and takes part in bilateral meetings with fellow G7 leaders.

11 a.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Intelligence and Special Operations hearing: “FY22 Defense Intelligence Enterprise Posture Hearing,” with David Taylor, performing the duties of the undersecretary of defense for intelligence and security; Gen. Paul Nakasone, director, National Security Agency; and Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier, director Defense Intelligence Agency. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

SUNDAY | JUNE 13

TBA — President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden meet with Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle, before departing for Brussels, Belgium.

MONDAY | JUNE 14

All Day — President Joe Biden participates in the NATO Summit and a separate U.S.–EU Summit.

WEDNESDAY | JUNE 16

All Day — In Geneva, Switzerland President Joe Biden will meet face to face with Russian President Vladimir Putin for the first time since assuming office.

THURSDAY | JUNE 17

10 a.m. 106 Dirksen — Senate Appropriations Committee hearing: “A Review of the FY 2022 Department of Defense Budget Request.” https://www.appropriations.senate.gov/hearings

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“When you enter the age of things like hypersonics, or artificial intelligence enabled actions … time availability shrinks or evaporates altogether, so what once may have been a warfighting advantage has now become a warfighting necessity.”

Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Dennis Crall, Joint Staff chief information officer, explaining to reporters how the Pentagon’s new Joint All-Domain Command and Control strategy, or JADC2, will help warfighters understand faster, decide faster, and then act faster.

Tags: National Security, Daily on Defense

Original Author: Jamie McIntyre

Original Location: NATO chief arrives in Washington looking ahead toward Russia and China, away from Afghanistan

A sense of relief over 'dear Joe' and post-Trump summit era .
BRUSSELS (AP) — Over the four years of Donald Trump's presidency and through the seeming eternity of pandemic misery and isolation, America’s partners in world affairs were waiting to exhale. As they cycled through Group of Seven, NATO and European Union summits over the last week, exhale they did, between bites of haggis mousse, pineapple weed and Dover sole. President Joe Biden — “dear Joe” to the European Commission's chief — engaged fellowAs they cycled through Group of Seven, NATO and European Union summits over the last week, exhale they did, between bites of haggis mousse, pineapple weed and Dover sole.

usr: 3
This is interesting!