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World Biden offers cagey laugh when asked if one meeting will change Putin's behavior

23:00  10 june  2021
23:00  10 june  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Biden-Putin summit: Key takeaways from their high-stakes meeting

  Biden-Putin summit: Key takeaways from their high-stakes meeting Here are key takeaways from the high-stakes summit between U.S. President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Both men called their meeting positive, but while Biden said he raised serious concerns and warned of consequences, he did not claim he got Putin to commit to changing his behavior and the Russian leader accepted no responsibility for cyberattacks on the U.S. or for anything else.

President Joe Biden just laughed when a reporter asked if he believes the few hours he will spend with Vladimir Putin next week will instantly change the mercurial Russian president’s behavior.

Joe Biden, Boris Johnson are posing for a picture © Provided by Washington Examiner

The U.S. commander in chief offered a toothy grin, then turned to face the reporter who asked the question following remarks in Cornwall, England, where he held meetings with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson ahead of the G-7 summit.

“Mr. President do you think your meeting with Vladimir Putin … will change his behavior in a way that sanctions haven’t?” the reporter, who was off-camera, asked Thursday.

Images of Biden's meeting with Putin show a cool but cordial dynamic as the president seeks a reset after Trump

  Images of Biden's meeting with Putin show a cool but cordial dynamic as the president seeks a reset after Trump Trump's behavior toward Putin repeatedly sparked criticism in Washington and fueled suspicions about the president's loyalties.Biden's approach to relations with Putin has marked a significant shift in the US stance toward Russia in comparison to the past four years under former President Donald Trump.

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Biden first grinned and looked at the ground as he left his lectern. But then the president slowed his gait and turned toward the journalist with a wide smile. He did not, however, provide a verbal description of what his smile meant.

But there have been clues in his and his top national security aides’ descriptions of the goals for the June 16 Putin summit in Geneva, Switzerland.

For weeks, the White House has painted the meeting as a chance for Biden to issue stern warnings to Putin on a number of matters.

That list includes recent ransomware attacks on companies that provide gasoline and meat products to millions in the United States, Moscow’s aggression in Ukraine and across Eastern Europe, and its disinformation campaign in many countries — including the U.S., with its 2016 election meddling.

With US-Russia relations at low point, Biden, Putin each bring a wariness to Geneva summit

  With US-Russia relations at low point, Biden, Putin each bring a wariness to Geneva summit When Joe Biden meets Vladimir Putin in Geneva the West's favorite geopolitical bogeyman is not likely to get the easy pass he got from Donald TrumpThree years ago this July, former President Donald Trump stood side by side with the Russian autocrat at a press conference in Finland's capital and blithely dismissed assessments from his own intelligence agencies, defense officials and American lawmakers about Russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.

“So, our basic view on this is that all ransomware attacks are crimes. They should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law, and every responsible nation should take action against the criminals who are conducting them and should not harbor them in any way,” Biden’s national security adviser Jake Sullivan told reporters traveling with Biden on Air Force One on Wednesday. “The President (Biden) will talk to President Putin about our concerns on this front.

“We do not judge that the Russian government has been behind these recent ransomware attacks, but we do judge that actors in Russia have,” he added. “And we believe that Russia can take and must take steps to deal with it.”

Asked later what Biden, then vice president, learned during a one-on-one meeting with the Russian leader a decade ago, Sullivan made clear again his boss’s goals for the much-anticipated meeting.

“Bottom line: He believes you need to be clear, direct, and straightforward in every aspect of the engagement with Vladimir Putin,” the security adviser said. “And that’s what he intends to do.”

Biden, unlike predecessors, has maintained Putin skepticism

  Biden, unlike predecessors, has maintained Putin skepticism BRUSSELS (AP) — President Joe Biden frequently talks about what he sees as central in executing effective foreign policy: building personal relationships. But unlike his four most recent White House predecessors, who made an effort to build a measure of rapport with Vladimir Putin, Biden has made clear that the virtue of fusing a personal connection might have its limits when it comes to the Russian leader. The president, who is set to meet with Putin face-to-face on Wednesday in Geneva, has repeated an anecdote about his last meeting with Putin, 10 years ago when he was vice president and Putin was serving as prime minister.

The president himself has suggested he is playing a long game vis a vis the Russian strongman, using part of his Memorial Day address to promise straight talk to Putin.

"I had a long conversation for two hours recently with [Chinese] President Xi [Jinping], making it clear to him we could do nothing but speak out for human rights around the world because that's who we are," Biden said. "I'll be meeting with [Russian] President [Vladimir] Putin in a couple weeks in Geneva, making it clear that we will not stand by and let him abuse those rights."

And upon his arrival in the U.K., the American president, also a former Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman, set another expectation for his Putin meeting: to bring about a more predictable relationship between the nuclear-armed countries.

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"We're not seeking conflict with Russia," he said at RAF Mildenhall. "We want a stable and predictable relationship. ... But I've been clear: The United States will respond in a robust and meaningful way if the Russian government engages in harmful activities."

Biden likely to come out of Putin summit empty-handed and risks handing the Kremlin a victory, former US officials warn

  Biden likely to come out of Putin summit empty-handed and risks handing the Kremlin a victory, former US officials warn "If there aren't clear deliverables criticism will grow that this high-level meeting ultimately benefited the Kremlin," a former US official said.Relations between the US and Russia have been deteriorating for years, and Washington has struggled to come up with an effective response to Putin's increasingly aggressive behavior both at home and abroad. Experts warn that Putin has no intention of using the meeting to improve relations, and question what Biden has to gain via the summit.

Biden's cagey laugh can be seen at the end of this archived video.

Tags: News, Joe Biden, Vladimir Putin, Russia, Boris Johnson, G7, White House

Original Author: John T. Bennett

Original Location: Biden offers cagey laugh when asked if one meeting will change Putin's behavior

Biden and Putin agree relations are abysmal. Will their meeting change anything? .
President Biden and Russia's Vladimir Putin agree the nations' relationship is at a low point before their summit. Trump sends the ex-KGB chief 'warmest regards.'Both said as much in interviews leading up to Wednesday's meeting in Geneva, which comes amid tensions over myriad issues, including a spate of cyberattacks emanating from within Russia; Putin's military adventurism along his country's border with Ukraine; and his imprisonment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who survived poisoning with a Russian nerve agent.

usr: 1
This is interesting!