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World Pope Francis Urges All Bishops to Take Responsibility for Abuse Cases, Refuses German Cardinal's Resignation

21:00  12 june  2021
21:00  12 june  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

'Dead end': German cardinal offers to quit over church abuse

  'Dead end': German cardinal offers to quit over church abuse BERLIN (AP) — A leading German cardinal and confidante of Pope Francis, Cardinal Reinhard Marx, offered to resign Friday over the Catholic Church's mishandling of clergy sexual abuse cases, declaring in an extraordinary public gesture that the church had arrived at “a dead end." The archdiocese of Munich and Freising, where Marx serves as archbishop, published his resignation letter to the pope online, in multiple languages, and the cardinal said Francis had given him permission to make it public.

Responding to the sex abuse scandal in the German Church, Pope Francis refused Thursday to allow Cardinal Reinhard Marx to step down, saying instead that a process of reform was necessary and that every bishop must take responsibility for the "catastrophe" of the crisis.

VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - JUNE 09: Pope Francis greets faithful as he leaves the Courtyard of St Damasus at the end of his weekly General Audience on June 09, 2021 in Vatican City, Vatican. For more than a year, beginning in May 2020, Pope Francis has offered an ongoing cycle of teaching on “prayer” during his weekly General Audience. © Franco Origlia/Getty Images VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - JUNE 09: Pope Francis greets faithful as he leaves the Courtyard of St Damasus at the end of his weekly General Audience on June 09, 2021 in Vatican City, Vatican. For more than a year, beginning in May 2020, Pope Francis has offered an ongoing cycle of teaching on “prayer” during his weekly General Audience.

In a letter to Marx, Francis responded to the explosive announcement that Marx would resign as archbishop of Munich and Freising due to the church's mishandling of abuse cases, the Associated Press reported.

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But Francis refused Marx's resignation, telling him (one of his closest advisers) that he must continue as archbishop and "shepherd my sheep."

He added that what the church needed is a process of reform "that doesn't consist in words but attitudes that have the courage of putting oneself in crisis, of assuming reality regardless of the consequences."

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

Francis' letter appeared to give Marx papal backing to proceed with the German Church's controversial reform process that was launched as a response to the abuse crisis.

The "Synodal Path" has sparked fierce resistance inside Germany and beyond, primarily from conservatives opposed to opening any debate on issues such as priestly celibacy, women's role in the church, and homosexuality.

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The speed with which Francis resoundingly rejected Marx's offer to resign was curious and suggested the drama might have been somewhat choreographed, perhaps to give Marx backing for the reforms.

Marx had said he had been thinking about resigning for several months and had discussed it with Francis. He said he decided to publish his resignation letter June 4, after Francis gave him permission.

Within a week, Francis had published his response, with the correspondence between both men being made public in a variety of languages.

Francis' decision to keep Marx on was welcomed by the head of the influential German lay group ZdK, or Central Committee of German Catholics, which is engaged in the reform process.

"I am happy that we are keeping Cardinal Marx as a strong voice, not least with a view to the Synodal Path," ZdK leader Thomas Sternberg told the Rheinische Post newspaper.

Heated debate before US Catholic bishops vote on Communion

  Heated debate before US Catholic bishops vote on Communion In impassioned debate Thursday, U.S. Catholic bishops clashed over how to address concerns about Catholic politicians, including President Joe Biden, who continue to receive Communion despite supporting abortion rights. Some bishops said a strong rebuke of Biden is needed because of his recent actions protecting and expanding abortion access. Others warned that such action would portray the bishops as a partisan force during a time of bitter political divisions across the country.


Video: Pope Francis changes Catholic law to criminalize sexual abuse by priests (NBC News)

But a prominent group representing German clergy abuse survivors, Eckiger Tisch, said Francis' decision had deprived Marx's offer of its radical impact. Marx, the group said in a statement, had targeted the responsibility of all bishops—including the pope—for the church's "system of abuse and cover-ups."

"Now the pope is just moderating this shocking insight away and, in so doing, also exonerating his own office," the group said. "Not much remains of the radical new beginning that Cardinal Marx's offer of resignation hinted at."

The group said the pope should have listened to German victims before making his decision.

Marx, for his part, said in a statement he was "surprised" by both the speed and the content of the pope's response, and accepted it out of obedience. But he said he still felt the need to personally carry responsibility for the crisis and would find a way to contribute to the necessary renewal.

"I view this decision by the pope as a great challenge," Marx said. "Just to go back to business as usual after this cannot be the way for me and for the archdiocese."

EXPLAINER: What is the Catholic Communion controversy?

  EXPLAINER: What is the Catholic Communion controversy? A committee of U.S. Catholic bishops is getting to work on a policy document that has stirred controversy among their colleagues before a word of it has even been written. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops overwhelmingly approved the drafting of a document “on the meaning of the Eucharist in the life of the Church” that some bishops hope will be a rebuke for politicians who support abortion rights but continue to receive Communion. TheThe U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops overwhelmingly approved the drafting of a document “on the meaning of the Eucharist in the life of the Church” that some bishops hope will be a rebuke for politicians who support abortion rights but continue to receive Communion.

In his letter, Francis said every bishop must take personal and collective responsibility for the institution's failures to protect young people from sexual predators, and that doing so inherently puts the institution in crisis.

"Not everyone wants to accept this reality, but it's the only path because making proposals to change your life without 'putting flesh on the grill,' won't do anything," Francis wrote.

The German church, one of the wealthiest in the world, is the latest to face a reckoning over the abuse scandal, after institutional reports made clear that thousands were victimized by priests and the hierarchy covered up the crimes for decades.

In 2018, a church-commissioned report concluded at least 3,677 people were abused by clergy in Germany between 1946 and 2014. More than half of the victims were 13 or younger and nearly a third were altar boys.

Earlier this year, another report came out about the church officials' handling of alleged sexual abuse in the country's western Cologne diocese. The archbishop of Hamburg, a former Cologne church official who was faulted in that report, offered his resignation and was granted a "time out" of unspecified length.

But significantly, the archbishop of Cologne, Cardinal Rainer Maria Woelki, who was cleared of wrongdoing by the report but remains under pressure for his handling of the issue, refused to step aside.

EXPLAINER: What is the Catholic Communion controversy?

  EXPLAINER: What is the Catholic Communion controversy? A committee of U.S. Catholic bishops is getting to work on a policy document that has stirred controversy among their colleagues before a word of it has even been written. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops overwhelmingly approved the drafting of a document “on the meaning of the Eucharist in the life of the Church” that some bishops hope will be a rebuke for politicians who support abortion rights but continue to receive Communion. TheThe U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops overwhelmingly approved the drafting of a document “on the meaning of the Eucharist in the life of the Church” that some bishops hope will be a rebuke for politicians who support abortion rights but continue to receive Communion.

Francis recently authorized a Vatican investigation into the archdiocese's handling of abuse cases.

Marx himself has not been implicated in any of the investigative reports to date, but he said all members of the hierarchy shared blame for the failures.

A report is expected this summer about the handling of sexual abuse cases in Marx's archdiocese.

a man wearing glasses: In this Oct. 21, 2015 file photo, German Cardinal Reinhard Marx attends a press conference by Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi at the Vatican's press center. Pope Francis refused Thursday, June 10, 2021 to accept the resignation offered by German Cardinal Reinhard Marx over the sex abuse scandal in the church, but said a process of reform was necessary and that every bishop must take responsibility for the “catastrophe” of the crisis. Andrew Medichini, file/AP Photo © Andrew Medichini, file/AP Photo In this Oct. 21, 2015 file photo, German Cardinal Reinhard Marx attends a press conference by Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi at the Vatican's press center. Pope Francis refused Thursday, June 10, 2021 to accept the resignation offered by German Cardinal Reinhard Marx over the sex abuse scandal in the church, but said a process of reform was necessary and that every bishop must take responsibility for the “catastrophe” of the crisis. Andrew Medichini, file/AP Photo

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Catholic Bishops Move Toward Denying Biden Communion .
Conservative bishops are trying to be more Catholic than the pope on enforcing opposition to abortion. A big fight is brewing.So it’s somewhat shocking that the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, acting against the public and private advice of the Vatican, took a deliberate step during its spring meeting to draft and promulgate a “document on the Eucharist” that some proponents said was intended to lead to the denial of communion to the president and other prominent pro-choice Catholic politicians. The vote, after a brief but intense debate, was 168-55, with six abstentions.

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This is interesting!