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World Human Rights Group Dismisses Trial Against Myanmar's Suu Kyi as 'Bogus'

17:21  14 june  2021
17:21  14 june  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Myanmar military junta charges Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption

  Myanmar military junta charges Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption Myanmar's deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been charged with corruption by the country's military junta, state media reported Thursday, adding to a raft of legal cases against the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. © Myanmar Radio and Television/AFP/Getty Images Aung San Suu Kyi appears in court in Naypyidaw on May 24 for the first time since the military detained her in a February coup. The new charge follows an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into several accusations leveled at Suu Kyi.

Human Rights Watch has called the allegations against Myanmar's ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi "bogus and politically motivated" in an effort to nullify the electoral victory of National League for Democracy lawmakers and prevent Suu Kyi from running for office again.

a group of people walking on a city street: Protesters make the three-finger salute as they take part in a flash mob demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on June 13, 2021. Human rights officials say the charges against ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi are © STR/AFP via Getty Images Protesters make the three-finger salute as they take part in a flash mob demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on June 13, 2021. Human rights officials say the charges against ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi are "bogus."

"This trial is clearly the opening salvo in an overall strategy to neuter Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy party as a force that can challenge military rule in the future," Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch, told the Associated Press.

Myanmar junta hits Suu Kyi with graft charges

  Myanmar junta hits Suu Kyi with graft charges The Myanmar junta has hit deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption charges over claims she accepted illegal payments of gold and more than half a million dollars in cash, state media reported Thursday. The latest charges relate to allegations by the former Yangon region chief minister that Suu Kyi illegally accepted $600,000 in cash from him along with around 11 kilograms of gold. The Anti-Corruption Commission found evidence that Suu Kyi had committed "corruption using her rank", according to the Global New Light of Myanmar, a state-run newspaper."So she was charged under Anti-Corruption Law section 55.

On February 1, the Myanmar army seized power before newly elected lawmakers could be seated and arrested Suu Kyi and other members of her government and the ruling party. Robertson said the charges against her should be dropped, but "there is little likelihood that she will receive a fair trial."

Myanmar's Suu Kyi faces most serious charge yet

  Myanmar's Suu Kyi faces most serious charge yet Myanmar's former leader is accused of accepting bribes and faces up to 15 years in jail.Ms Suu Kyi is accused of accepting cash and gold in bribes, and faces up to 15 years in jail if found guilty.

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below:

Suu Kyi has been charged with illegally importing walkie-talkies for her bodyguards' use, unlicensed use of the radios and spreading information that could cause public alarm or unrest, as well as for two counts of violating the Natural Disaster Management Law for allegedly breaking pandemic restrictions during the 2020 election campaign, her lawyers said Sunday.

"All these charges should be dropped, resulting in her immediate and unconditional release," said Robertson. "But sadly, with the restrictions on access to her lawyers, and the case being heard in front of a court that is wholly beholden to the military junta, there is little likelihood she will receive a fair trial."

Junta trial of Myanmar's Suu Kyi to hear first testimony

  Junta trial of Myanmar's Suu Kyi to hear first testimony The trial of ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi will hear its first testimony in a junta court Monday, more than four months after a military coup. Near daily protests have rocked Myanmar since the generals' putsch removed her government in February, ending a 10-year experiment with democracy. The mass uprising has been met with a brutal military crackdown that has killed more than 850 people, according to a local monitoring group. The juntaNear daily protests have rocked Myanmar since the generals' putsch removed her government in February, ending a 10-year experiment with democracy.

Government prosecutors will have until June 28 to finish their presentation, after which Suu Kyi's defense team will have until July 26 to present its case, Khin Maung Zaw, the team's senior member, said last week. Court sessions are due to be held on Monday and Tuesday each week.

Two other more serious charges against Suu Kyi are being handled separately: one for breaching the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, which carries a maximum 14-year prison term, and another for bribery, which has a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison and a fine.

Although Suu Kyi faced her first charge just days after the February coup, she was not allowed her first face-to-face meeting with her lawyers until May 24, when she made her first actual appearance in court for a pretrial hearing. Since then, she had another brief meeting with them before seeing them in court Monday.

A photo of her May 24 appearance released by state media showed her sitting straight-backed in a small courtroom, wearing a pink face mask, her hands folded in her lap. Alongside her were her two co-defendants, the former president as well as the former mayor of Naypyitaw, Myo Aung.

Aung San Suu Kyi: Trial begins for ousted Myanmar leader following military coup

  Aung San Suu Kyi: Trial begins for ousted Myanmar leader following military coup Myanmar's ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi went on trial Monday, more than four months after the country's military seized power in a coup. © KOEN VAN WEEL/ANP/AFP/Getty Images TOPSHOT - Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi looks on before the UN's International Court of Justice on December 11, 2019 in the Peace Palace of The Hague, on the second day of her hearing on the Rohingya genocide case. - Aung San Suu Kyi appears at the UN's top court today, a day after the former democracy icon was urged to "stop the genocide" against Rohingya Muslims.

The army justified its coup by alleging the government failed to properly investigate accusations of voting irregularities. Since then it has said it has found evidence of fraud—an assertion contested by the independent Asian Network for Free Elections and many others. Junta officials have threatened to dissolve the National League for Democracy and any conviction for Suu Kyi could see her barred from politics.

The junta has claimed it will hold new elections within the next year or two, but the country's military has a long history of promising elections and not following through. The military ruled Myanmar for 50 years after a coup in 1962 and kept Suu Kyi under house arrest for 15 years after a failed 1988 popular uprising.

The military's latest takeover sparked nationwide protests that continue despite a violent crackdown that has killed hundreds of people. Although street demonstrations have shrunk in number and scale, the junta now faces a low-level armed insurrection by opponents in both rural and urban areas.

Aung San Suu Kyi posing for the camera: In this Dec. 11, 2019, file photo, Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi waits to address judges of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands. Myanmar’s Anti-Corruption Commission has found that ousted national leader Aung San Suu Kyi had accepted bribes and misused her authority to gain advantageous terms in real estate deals, government-controlled media in the military-ruled country reported Thursday, June 10, 2021. Officials from a human rights groups called the charges against Suu Kyi © Peter Dejong/AP Photo In this Dec. 11, 2019, file photo, Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi waits to address judges of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands. Myanmar’s Anti-Corruption Commission has found that ousted national leader Aung San Suu Kyi had accepted bribes and misused her authority to gain advantageous terms in real estate deals, government-controlled media in the military-ruled country reported Thursday, June 10, 2021. Officials from a human rights groups called the charges against Suu Kyi "bogus." Peter Dejong/AP Photo

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The UN has condemned Myanmar’s military coup. Will that matter? .
“We cannot live in a world where military coups become a norm,” the UN Secretary-General said.The condemnation comes as UN officials express concern that the nation is on the brink of civil war and as humanitarian conditions worsen for civilians. While significant, though, the vote itself revealed complicated geopolitics that may stymie a more forceful international response to the situation.

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