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World Aung San Suu Kyi: Trial begins for ousted Myanmar leader following military coup

18:35  14 june  2021
18:35  14 june  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Myanmar military junta charges Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption

  Myanmar military junta charges Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption Myanmar's deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been charged with corruption by the country's military junta, state media reported Thursday, adding to a raft of legal cases against the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. © Myanmar Radio and Television/AFP/Getty Images Aung San Suu Kyi appears in court in Naypyidaw on May 24 for the first time since the military detained her in a February coup. The new charge follows an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into several accusations leveled at Suu Kyi.

Myanmar's ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi went on trial Monday, more than four months after the country's military seized power in a coup.

Aung San Suu Kyi wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: TOPSHOT - Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi looks on before the UN's International Court of Justice on December 11, 2019 in the Peace Palace of The Hague, on the second day of her hearing on the Rohingya genocide case. - Aung San Suu Kyi appears at the UN's top court today, a day after the former democracy icon was urged to © KOEN VAN WEEL/ANP/AFP/Getty Images TOPSHOT - Myanmar's State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi looks on before the UN's International Court of Justice on December 11, 2019 in the Peace Palace of The Hague, on the second day of her hearing on the Rohingya genocide case. - Aung San Suu Kyi appears at the UN's top court today, a day after the former democracy icon was urged to "stop the genocide" against Rohingya Muslims. Once hailed internationally for her defiance of Myanmar's junta, the Nobel peace laureate will this time be on the side of the southeast Asian nation's military when she takes the stand at the International Court of Justice. (Photo by Koen Van WEEL / ANP / AFP) / Netherlands OUT (Photo by KOEN VAN WEEL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)

The court, in the capital Naypyidaw, heard the first criminal cases against the deposed leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Suu Kyi's lawyer Khin Maung Zaw said she appeared unwell throughout the hearing.

Myanmar junta hits Suu Kyi with graft charges

  Myanmar junta hits Suu Kyi with graft charges The Myanmar junta has hit deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi with corruption charges over claims she accepted illegal payments of gold and more than half a million dollars in cash, state media reported Thursday. The latest charges relate to allegations by the former Yangon region chief minister that Suu Kyi illegally accepted $600,000 in cash from him along with around 11 kilograms of gold. The Anti-Corruption Commission found evidence that Suu Kyi had committed "corruption using her rank", according to the Global New Light of Myanmar, a state-run newspaper."So she was charged under Anti-Corruption Law section 55.

The trial addressed three charges, including that Suu Kyi, 75, violated a communications law by allegedly importing and using a number of walkie-talkie radios, and violated coronavirus restrictions during election campaigning last year.

The court also heard one case against deposed President U Win Myint over the alleged violation of the country's disaster management laws.

Suu Kyi "seemed not very well," her lawyer told CNN, adding that "throughout the hearing she seemed quite interested and paid keen attention."

The trial will resume Tuesday for Suu Kyi on two other charges, while the most serious charges against her, of corruption and violations of the State Secrets Act have yet to be assigned a trial date.

Under the command of coup leader Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, Myanmar's military seized power on February 1, sparking months of civilian protests and deadly clashes. Since then a number of democratically-elected leaders, including Suu Kyi, have been held in detention and charged with a litany of offenses.

Myanmar's Suu Kyi faces most serious charge yet

  Myanmar's Suu Kyi faces most serious charge yet Myanmar's former leader is accused of accepting bribes and faces up to 15 years in jail.Ms Suu Kyi is accused of accepting cash and gold in bribes, and faces up to 15 years in jail if found guilty.

Activists and legal experts have criticized the charges against Suu Kyi as politically motivated and part of a larger crackdown by the military to stifle dissent and consolidate power.

"This is exactly a show trial," said David Mathieson, an independent analyst based in Yangon. "This is a political spectacle in order to discredit Aung San Suu Kyi and the democratic opposition."

He added that despite the junta's efforts to discredit Suu Kyi, she remains hugely popular among the public -- and after experiencing some democratic reforms in the past decade, "the majority of 54 million people do not want the military to run the country anymore."

"They don't trust the military, they don't trust the legal system," Mathieson said. "What I think the military should really be worried about is less the residual influence and power and charismatic authority that Aung San Suu Kyi has, and more the fact that the coup has sparked nationwide resistance, all around the country against the military."

Junta trial of Myanmar's Suu Kyi to hear first testimony

  Junta trial of Myanmar's Suu Kyi to hear first testimony The trial of ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi will hear its first testimony in a junta court Monday, more than four months after a military coup. Near daily protests have rocked Myanmar since the generals' putsch removed her government in February, ending a 10-year experiment with democracy. The mass uprising has been met with a brutal military crackdown that has killed more than 850 people, according to a local monitoring group. The juntaNear daily protests have rocked Myanmar since the generals' putsch removed her government in February, ending a 10-year experiment with democracy.

Ahead of Suu Kyi's trial Monday, nearly 100 supporters marched briefly in Yangon, chanting slogans and making the three-finger salute adopted from "The Hunger Games" that has become a symbol of defiance.

In total, Suu Kyi faces seven charges. She is also accused of violating the Official Secrets Act, which carries a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison. That case is due to resume later this month.

Last Thursday, she was slapped with an additional charge of "corruption using her rank," with a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. Suu Kyi's lawyer Khin Maung Zaw called the charge "absurd," saying on Thursday that she is "honest and incorruptible."

The military, known as the Tatmadaw, staged its coup after claiming widespread voter fraud during the November 2020 parliamentary elections. The military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) performed dismally, while Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) party won a landslide and a second term in government.

It was only the second democratic vote since the previous junta began a series of reforms in 2011, following half a century of brutal military rule that plunged Myanmar into poverty and isolationism.

Human Rights Group Dismisses Trial Against Myanmar's Suu Kyi as 'Bogus'

  Human Rights Group Dismisses Trial Against Myanmar's Suu Kyi as 'Bogus' "This trial is clearly the opening salvo in an overall strategy to neuter Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy party as a force that can challenge military rule in the future," the deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch said."This trial is clearly the opening salvo in an overall strategy to neuter Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy party as a force that can challenge military rule in the future," Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch, told the Associated Press.

The military has not provided evidence for its claims of fraud, and the previous election commission denied any voting discrepancies had taken place.

In the four months since, the junta has cracked down on nationwide pro-democracy protests and a prolonged civil disobedience movement that at times saw tens of thousands of people on the streets.

These mass demonstrations have subsided since March and April, but there are still flash protests like the one on Monday, which appear and then dissipate quickly, said Mathieson.

There has also been the recent emergence of "people's resistance" fighters who are taking up arms against junta forces. Many members of the disobedience movement have fled to areas controlled by ethnic armed groups that have been fighting the military, central government and each other for greater rights and autonomy, on and off for 70 years.

Fighting between these local militia groups and the Tatmadaw has spread across those remote, mountainous regions, especially in the western Chin state, with reports of whole villages forced to abandon their homes.

As of Monday, more than 860 people have been killed by junta-led security forces and 6,027 have been arrested since the coup, according to advocacy group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners. Among them are protesters, activists, journalists, celebrities, government officials, as well as children and bystanders.

Rights group: Facebook amplified Myanmar military propaganda .
Facebook's recommendation algorithm amplifies military propaganda and other material that breaches the company's own policies in Myanmar following the country's military coup in February, a new report by the rights group Global Witness has found. A month after the military seized power in Myanmar and imprisoned elected leaders, Facebook's algorithms were still prompting users to view and “like” pro-military pages with posts that incited and threatened violence, pushed misinformation that could lead to physical harm, praised the military and glorified its abuses, Global Witness said in the report, published late Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

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