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World Tokyo Olympics staff start receiving vaccines

15:36  18 june  2021
15:36  18 june  2021 Source:   bbc.com

Japanese who support the Games fear speaking out

  Japanese who support the Games fear speaking out Some Japanese - including athletes - are afraid to come forward and show support for the Olympics.The Tokyo Olympics, up until the pandemic, may have been an unlikely target. But with less than 50 days till the start of the event, the majority of the public say they want the Games to be cancelled or postponed again.

Officials and volunteers working on the Tokyo Olympics started receiving Covid-19 vaccinations on Friday, five weeks before the games are set to start.

a group of people standing around a table: Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike (left) was seen visiting a clinic as part of the drive © Reuters Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike (left) was seen visiting a clinic as part of the drive

Pfizer are providing enough doses for 40,000 people, in an effort separate to Japan's national vaccination drive.

The opening ceremony for the games, originally meant to happen last year, will take place on 23 July.

There is ongoing debate in the country on whether domestic fans will be allowed to attend the games.

The country's leading medical experts say it would be safest if all fans are not allowed but other officials have indicated they want spectators to attend if possible.

How the Olympics will navigate COVID-19

  How the Olympics will navigate COVID-19 The International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee on Tuesday revealed the third and final version of "playbooks" that outline countermeasures and rules that athletes and other Olympic participants must follow while in Japan. The countermeasures include daily COVID testing, restrictions on movement within and outside of Olympic venues, and removal from competition for anybody who tests positive. Here's what we know about theThe International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee on Tuesday revealed the third and final version of "playbooks" that outline countermeasures and rules that athletes and other Olympic participants must follow while in Japan.

The games are still scheduled to go ahead despite a fresh wave of Covid-19 cases in Japan in recent months.

A state of emergency in Tokyo is set to be lifted on Sunday, but polls in local media suggest public scepticism to the games going ahead remains high amid a slow vaccine roll-out.

  • When are Olympics and will they go ahead?
  • Why people are afraid to show support for games

Only about 16% of the country's population have received one Covid-19 dose so far, according to the Reuters news agency.

The vaccine doses allocated for games officials have been supplied by Pfizer as part of a deal agreed with the International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government.

Those being vaccinated include volunteers and staff working at the athletes village and members of the media covering the games.

"Now that I will be vaccinated, I will feel a little more reassured doing my job," Chika Hirai, director of doping control for Tokyo 2020, was quoted by the AFP news agency as saying.

Fact check: COVID-19 vaccines aren't magnetic .
All three coronavirus vaccines approved for emergency use in the United States are free from metals. And even if they did have metallic ingredients, public health officials say the vaccines wouldn't cause a magnetic reaction. USA TODAY reached out to Ruby and Tenpenny for comment. Vaccine ingredients aren't magnetic The lists of ingredients for all three coronavirus vaccines approved for emergency use are publicly available online. None of them include magnetic substances.

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This is interesting!