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World Ship That Sunk Carrying 25 Tons of Chemicals Caused 'Significant Damage' to Planet

20:21  21 june  2021
20:21  21 june  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Sri Lanka grants bail to captain of cargo ship MV X-Press Pearl embroiled in one of its worst environmental disasters

  Sri Lanka grants bail to captain of cargo ship MV X-Press Pearl embroiled in one of its worst environmental disasters The captain of a container ship that caught fire and partially sunk off the coast of Sri Lanka, causing one of the country's worst environmental disasters, was arrested Monday before being granted bail, local police said. © Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images The Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl carrying hundreds of tons of chemicals and plastics, sinks after burning for almost two weeks, just outside Colombo's harbor on June 2.

A container ship that caught fire while carrying hazardous chemicals off the coast of Sri Lanka's capital Colombo has caused "significant damage" to the planet by releasing the chemicals, a United Nations representative said.

a small boat in a large body of water: A Sri Lankan fishing boat operates in the backdrop of the site where the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl, which is sinking after burning for almost three weeks in the sea off Colombo Harbour, in Colombo on June 18, 2021. © Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP via Getty Images A Sri Lankan fishing boat operates in the backdrop of the site where the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl, which is sinking after burning for almost three weeks in the sea off Colombo Harbour, in Colombo on June 18, 2021.

The Singapore-flagged X-Press Pearl finally sank on Thursday a month after it caught on fire, the Associated Press reported. Due to the material it was carrying, many have raised concerns about an environmental disaster.

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Hanaa Singer-Hamdy, U.N. Resident Coordinator in Sri Lanka, issued a statement late Saturday about the effects on the environment caused by the ship's sinking.

"An environmental emergency of this nature causes significant damage to the planet by the release of hazardous substances into the ecosystem," she said. "This, in turn, threatens lives and livelihoods of the population in the coastal areas."

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

The U.N. said it was coordinating international efforts and helping Sri Lanka in assessing the damage, recovery efforts and preventing such disasters in the future.

A U.N. team of oil spill and chemical experts— provided by the European Union— has been sent to Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka has already submitted an interim claim of $40 million to X-Press Feeders to cover part of the cost of fighting the fire, which broke out on May 20 when the vessel was anchored about 9.5 nautical miles (18 kilometers) northwest of Colombo and waiting to enter the port.

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The Sri Lankan navy believes the blaze was caused by its chemical cargo, which included 25 tons of nitric acid and other chemicals, most of which were destroyed in the fire. But debris, including burned fiberglass and tons of plastic pellets, have already polluted nearby beaches.

A ship manifest seen by the Associated Press said the ship carrying just under 1,500 containers, with 81 of those described as "dangerous" goods.

The main concern has been about 300 tons of bunker oil used as fuel for the ship. But officials have been saying it could have burned off in the fire.

Both Sri Lankan authorities and the ship's operator, X-Press Feeders, have said so far there is no sign of an oil spill.

a large ship in a body of water: This photo provided by Sri Lankan Navy shows the sinking MV X-Press Pearl off Colombo port, Sri Lanka, Thursday, June 17, 2021. The container ship carrying chemicals sank off Sri Lanka’s capital on Thursday nearly a month after catching fire, raising concerns about a possible environmental disaster. The ship's operator said the wreck of the Singapore-flagged X-Press Pearl © Sri Lanka Navy via AP This photo provided by Sri Lankan Navy shows the sinking MV X-Press Pearl off Colombo port, Sri Lanka, Thursday, June 17, 2021. The container ship carrying chemicals sank off Sri Lanka’s capital on Thursday nearly a month after catching fire, raising concerns about a possible environmental disaster. The ship's operator said the wreck of the Singapore-flagged X-Press Pearl "is now wholly sitting on the seabed at a depth of 21 meters (70 feet).” Sri Lanka Navy via AP

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