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World Hong Kong police arrest another Apple Daily editor under security law

08:21  21 july  2021
08:21  21 july  2021 Source:   afp.com

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Police have arrested the former executive editor -in-chief of Hong Kong 's Apple Daily , a pro-democracy tabloid that was forced to close after authorities raided its offices and arrested staff on June 17. In a statement to AFP news agency, police said they had arrested the 51-year-old former editor Lam Man-chung for "collusion with foreign forces," a national security Officials said Apple Daily staffers were arrested for violating a national security law that was imposed on Hong Kong by Beijing last year. It was the first time police took aim at media organizations under the sweeping legislation.

Hong Kong ’s national security police have arrested the editor -in-chief and four other directors of the Apple Daily newspaper in early morning raids involving hundreds of officers, over their role in the publication of dozens of articles alleged to be part of a conspiracy to collude with foreign forces. The city’s security chief, John Lee, accused those arrested of using “journalistic work as a tool to endanger national security ”, and issued a chilling warning to residents and other media. “Normal journalists are different from these people,” Lee said. “Please keep a distance from them.” The police force’s

A former senior editor of Hong Kong's shuttered pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily was arrested by national security police on Wednesday morning.

a group of people in a room: Lam Man-Chung, then executive editor in chief of Hong Kong's pro-democracy 'Apple Daily' newspaper on the day before it printed its final edition © Anthony WALLACE Lam Man-Chung, then executive editor in chief of Hong Kong's pro-democracy 'Apple Daily' newspaper on the day before it printed its final edition

A police source told AFP that former executive editor-in-chief Lam Man-chung had been detained.

In a statement, police said they had arrested a 51-year-old former newspaper editor for "collusion with foreign forces", a national security crime.

Lam is the eighth employee of Apple Daily arrested under a sweeping national security law that Beijing imposed on Hong Kong last year after huge and often violent democracy protests.

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HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong police arrested on Wednesday a columnist for pro-democracy tabloid Apple Daily on suspicion of conspiring to collude with a foreign country or foreign forces, in another hit to the besieged newspaper. The latest arrest came after police froze assets of companies linked to the newspaper and arrested five executives last week, moves that are likely to force the newspaper to shut down this week. Police have said dozens of Apple Daily pieces may have violated the security law , the first instance of authorities taking aim at media articles under the legislation.

Hong Kong police arrested a former senior journalist with the now-closed Apple Daily newspaper on Sunday night on a suspected national security offence as he was trying to catch a flight out of the city, media reported. The Apple Daily , a popular tabloid, was forced to fold following a raid by 500 police on its headquarters on June 17 and the freezing of key assets and bank accounts. It printed its final edition last Thursday. Authorities say dozens of the paper's articles may have violated a national security law that Beijing imposed on the financial hub last year, the first instance of authorities taking

Lam's girlfriend told local media Citizen News that the arrest was made at home at dawn. Police seized his computers and mobile phones for investigation.

"Nowadays working in journalism, one wouldn't be unprepared psychologically (for this)," she told Citizen News.

Apple Daily, an unapologetic backer of the democracy movement, put out its last edition last month after its top leadership was arrested and its assets frozen under the security law.

Lam was the editor who oversaw that final edition, ending the paper's 26-year run.

Authorities said Apple Daily's reporting and editorials backed calls for international sanctions against China, a political stance that has been criminalised by the new security law.

The tabloid's owner Jimmy Lai, 73, is currently in prison and has been charged with collusion alongside two other executives who have been denied bail.

They face up to life in prison if convicted.

Among the others arrested, but currently not charged, are two of the paper's leading editorial writers, including one who was detained at Hong Kong's airport as he tried to leave the city.

The paper's sudden demise was a stark warning to all media outlets on the reach of a new national security law in a city that once billed itself as a beacon of press freedom in the region.

Last week the Hong Kong Journalists Association said media freedoms were "in tatters" as China remoulds the once outspoken business hub in its own authoritarian image.

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Hong Kong national security law: Tong Ying-kit sentenced to 9 years in prison .
The first person charged and convicted under Hong Kong's national security law was sentenced to nine years in prison on Friday, setting a likely precedent for how future cases will be tried. © Getty Images Tong Ying-Kit arriving in court on July 6, 2020, in Hong Kong. Tong Ying-kit, 24, received a six-and-a-half-year prison term for the charge of incitement to secession for carrying a large black banner emblazoned with the popular anti-government protest slogan, "Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times.

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This is interesting!