•   
  •   
  •   

World The Latest: Blinken says US working with Taliban on flights

12:06  07 september  2021
12:06  07 september  2021 Source:   msn.com

The Taliban have declared victory. Now they must reckon with a country freefalling into chaos

  The Taliban have declared victory. Now they must reckon with a country freefalling into chaos The last American military flight left the airport and disappeared into the Kabul sky on Monday -- and minutes later, the Taliban flooded the streets around the city's last exit point, filling the night with celebratory gunfire. © Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/Shutterstock Taliban militants spilled onto the streets outside Kabul airport after the final Western military flight left on Monday. It was a decisive and humbling final chapter to the United States' longest war, a two-decade effort that unraveled spectacularly in the space of a few weeks.

DOHA, Qatar — U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken says the State Department is working with the Taliban to facilitate additional charter flights from Kabul for people seeking to leave Afghanistan after the American military and diplomatic departure.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, arrives at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP) © Provided by Associated Press US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, arrives at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP)

Blinken was speaking on Tuesday at a joint news conference with Qatar’s top diplomats and defense officials. He said the U.S. has been in contact with the Taliban “in recent hours” to work out arrangements for additional charter flights from the Afghan capital.

Al Qaeda, ISIS-K, and a trio of has-beens: The players in Taliban-led Afghanistan

  Al Qaeda, ISIS-K, and a trio of has-beens: The players in Taliban-led Afghanistan Just over a week ago, the U.S.-backed Islamic Republic of Afghanistan was overthrown as the Taliban swept through Afghanistan and seized the capital with the aim of establishing the so-called “Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan."As thousands of Americans and Afghan allies remain behind Taliban lines in Afghanistan as the U.S. evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport continues, multiple players in the country, including Taliban allies such as the Haqqani Network and al Qaeda, have strengthened their hand while anti-Taliban warlords have fled the country and anti-Taliban resistance fighters engage in a desperate fight with the country's new rulers.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, fist-bumps Ambassador John Desrocher, left, as MFA Director of Protocol Ambassador Ibrahim Fakhroo looks on upon Blinken's arrival at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP) © Provided by Associated Press US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, fist-bumps Ambassador John Desrocher, left, as MFA Director of Protocol Ambassador Ibrahim Fakhroo looks on upon Blinken's arrival at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP)

Blinken said the Taliban have given assurances of safe passage for all seeking to leave Afghanistan with proper travel documents. He said the United States would hold the Taliban to that pledge.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, is welcomed upon his arrival by MFA Director of Protocol Ambassador Ibrahim Fakhroo at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP) © Provided by Associated Press US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, right, is welcomed upon his arrival by MFA Director of Protocol Ambassador Ibrahim Fakhroo at Old Doha Airport in Qatar's capital Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. Blinken is meeting with Qatari leaders to thank the nation for its support in the Afghanistan evacuation efforts and to discuss the future of US-Afghanistan relations. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP)

Blinken said the United States believes there are “somewhere around 100” American citizens still in Afghanistan who want to leave. The State Department had previously put that estimate at between 100 and 200.

Latest on Afghanistan: Biden says US 'on a pace' for Aug. 31 pullout; Taliban block Afghans from airport

  Latest on Afghanistan: Biden says US 'on a pace' for Aug. 31 pullout; Taliban block Afghans from airport Biden added the deadline depends on Taliban cooperation, and added that he has asked the Depts. of State and Defense to prepare contingency plans.His remarks from the White House came the same day the Taliban said it would stop Afghans from trying to go to the Kabul airport and told women to stay home to stay for a time to stay safe, fueling worries about how the Taliban will treat women.

Blinken and U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin are in Qatar to thank the Gulf Arab state for its help with the transit of tens of thousands of people evacuated from Afghanistan after the Taliban took control of Kabul on Aug. 15.

___

MORE ON AFGHANISTAN:

Blinken and Austin to visit Gulf to address postwar stresses

Taliban say they took Panjshir, last holdout Afghan province

Over 24 hours in Kabul, brutality, trauma, moments of grace

US: Afghan evacuees who fail initial screening Kosovo-bound

Rescue groups: US tally misses hundreds left in Afghanistan

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan Monday, Sept. 6, 2021.(AP Photo/Muhammad Farooq) © Provided by Associated Press Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan Monday, Sept. 6, 2021.(AP Photo/Muhammad Farooq)

___

— Find more AP coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/afghanistan

In this handout photo provided by UK Parliament, MPs listen to Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson giving an update on the latest situation in Afghanistan in the House of Commons, London, Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. (Jessica Taylor/UK Parliament via AP) © Provided by Associated Press In this handout photo provided by UK Parliament, MPs listen to Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson giving an update on the latest situation in Afghanistan in the House of Commons, London, Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. (Jessica Taylor/UK Parliament via AP)

___

Senior Democrat's spokesperson disputes Blinken's comments about flights grounded in Afghanistan

  Senior Democrat's spokesperson disputes Blinken's comments about flights grounded in Afghanistan The communications director for a senior Democratic senator pushed back on comments from Secretary of State Antony Blinken about charter flights that have been grounded for days in the north of Afghanistan, as uncertainty over the militant group's promises to let Americans leave Afghanistan continued to roil Washington and as the Taliban named members of a designated terror group to its interim government. © OLIVIER DOULIERY/POOL/AFP/Getty Images US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin meet with Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani and Qatari Deputy Prime Ministe

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

BOSTON — Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal: Promote law and order and government accountability and modernize a war-ravaged land.

A general view of an Afghan refugee camp inside the US military base in Ramstein, Germany Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken headed on Sunday via Ramstein to Qatar on his first trip since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan as he seeks a united front with allies shaken by the chaos.  (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP) © Provided by Associated Press A general view of an Afghan refugee camp inside the US military base in Ramstein, Germany Monday, Sept. 6, 2021. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken headed on Sunday via Ramstein to Qatar on his first trip since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan as he seeks a united front with allies shaken by the chaos. (Olivier Douliery/Pool Photo via AP)

But in the Taliban’s lightning seizure of power, most of that digital apparatus — including biometrics for verifying identities — apparently fell into Taliban hands. Built with few data-protection safeguards, it risks becoming the high-tech jackboots of a surveillance state. As the Taliban get their governing feet, there are worries it will be used for social control and to punish perceived foes.

As world marks 9/11, Taliban flag raised over seat of power

  As world marks 9/11, Taliban flag raised over seat of power KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban raised their iconic white flag over the Afghan presidential palace Saturday, a spokesman said, as the U.S. and the world marked the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. The banner, emblazoned with a Quranic verse, was hoisted by Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund, the prime minister of the Taliban interim government, in a low-key ceremony, said Ahmadullah Muttaqi, multimedia branch chief of the Taliban’s cultural commission. © Provided by Associated Press A man walks down the stairs at dusk in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021.

FILE - In this June 30, 2021, file photo an employee scans the eyes of a woman for biometric data needed to apply for a passport, at the passport office in Kabul, Afghanistan. Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal was to promote law and order and government accountability, and to modernize a war-ravaged land.  But in the Taliban’s lightning seizure of power, most of that digital apparatus fell into the hands of an unreliable rulers. Built with few data-protection safeguards, it risks becoming the high-tech jackboots of a surveillance state. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this June 30, 2021, file photo an employee scans the eyes of a woman for biometric data needed to apply for a passport, at the passport office in Kabul, Afghanistan. Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal was to promote law and order and government accountability, and to modernize a war-ravaged land.  But in the Taliban’s lightning seizure of power, most of that digital apparatus fell into the hands of an unreliable rulers. Built with few data-protection safeguards, it risks becoming the high-tech jackboots of a surveillance state. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File)

Putting such data to work constructively — boosting education, empowering women, battling corruption — requires democratic stability, and these systems were not architected for the prospect of defeat.

“It is a terrible irony,” said Frank Pasquale, Brooklyn Law School scholar of surveillance technologies. “It’s a real object lesson in ‘The road to hell is paved with good intentions.’”

Since Kabul fell Aug. 15, indications have emerged that government data may have been used in Taliban efforts to identify and intimidate Afghans who worked with the U.S. forces.

‘Debacle’ and ‘betrayal’: Blinken ripped for Afghanistan failures in rancorous House hearing .
MORE GRILLED BLINKEN ON TAP: To call yesterday’s House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on the Biden administration's withdrawal from Afghanistan “contentious” would be to risk serious understatement. Secretary of State Antony Blinken faced withering criticism from Republicans on the committee, including demands he resign. More “grilled Blinken” is on the menu for this morning as the embattled secretary of state is raked over the hibachi by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, beginning at 10 a.m. © Provided by Washington Examiner DOD header 2020 “I can summarize this in one word, ‘betrayal,’” said ranking Republican Rep.

usr: 1
This is interesting!