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World Five key takeaways from the China-focused 'AUKUS' deal

09:50  17 september  2021
09:50  17 september  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

The US, UK, and Australia are teaming up to develop new defense technology - including nuclear-powered subs

  The US, UK, and Australia are teaming up to develop new defense technology - including nuclear-powered subs The new group will allow the countries to share advanced technologies including AI, cyber, underwater systems and long-range strike capabilities.The three countries will work together to "strengthen the ability of each" to pursue their defense interests through cooperation on defense technology.

This " AUKUS " agreement will enable Australia to design its own nuclear-powered attack submarines. Here are five key takeaways . 1) Australia views China as a critical threat. Unless and until the Australian and British navies join U.S. freedom of navigation patrols within 12 miles of China 's pirate islands, this deal will remain limited in its strategic impact. 4) New Zealand is no longer a serious member of the Five Eyes partnership. New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says that her nation was not invited to join this agreement.

Here are 5 key learnings from the pandemic that businesses can draw upon to quickly adapt, reorient to the new normal and navigate towards future growth. This is evident from museums such as the Louvre and MoMA which have seamlessly transitioned to offering virtual tours online to combat the lack of footfall[1]. Another excellent example is Chinese cosmetics company Lin Qingxuan. Faced with the shuttering of half of its stores, the company converted its beauty advisers into online influencers that engaged customers via WeChat to promote online sales[2].

The United States and United Kingdom will share proprietary nuclear propulsion technology with Australia. They will also cooperate on long-range strike weapons, artificial intelligence, and cybertechnology. This "AUKUS" agreement will enable Australia to design its own nuclear-powered attack submarines.

a large ship in a body of water © Provided by Washington Examiner

Here are five key takeaways.

1) Australia views China as a critical threat

While Australia will only build nuclear attack submarines (nuclear-powered but conventionally armed) and not nuclear ballistic missile submarines (armed with nuclear weapons), this agreement reflects Australia's new critical threat perception of China.

Joe Biden Acted Like Donald Trump to Stab France in the Back, Official Says

  Joe Biden Acted Like Donald Trump to Stab France in the Back, Official Says In an emotive interview on Thursday, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian accused the United States of leading a betrayal of trust against France.In an interview with radio station franceinfo on Thursday, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian channeled prevailing national sentiment and went on to describe Canberra's reneging on a diesel submarine agreement with France's Naval Group as a betrayal of trust.

Furious China issues bone-chilling warning subs deal could 'make Australia a potential target for a NUCLEAR strike'. Australia will get nuclear powered submarines in a technology sharing deal with the US and the UK. Mr Morrison will now have to tear up previous billion French deal - to the fury of President Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said the ' AUKUS ' alliance 'seriously damages regional peace and stability, intensifies the arms race, and undermines the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.' And China 's Global Times news website - a mouthpiece for the

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken hailed the recently-unveiled AUKUS treaty as a sign of “the country’s shared commitment to safeguard peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific now and in the future” during a Thursday press conference in Washington, DC, adding that the US has concerns about Beijing economically pressuring Australia. Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne praised the newly-strengthened US-UK alliance as “well-suited for countering economic coercion.”

Facing Australia's increased restriction of Chinese espionage and political influence and its support for U.S. efforts to deter Chinese imperialism, Beijing has waged an aggressive economic pressure campaign against Canberra. In turn, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has boosted defense spending and strengthened military ties to the U.S.

Australian nuclear attack submarines will complement this action in significant ways, allowing for more flexible, longer-range, longer-duration Australian naval operations. They will also offer greater security against the next generation of Chinese satellite and aerial sensor systems. Unlike the diesel-electric-powered Shortfin Barracuda submarines that Australia had been scheduled to buy, nuclear submarines need not snorkel to recharge their batteries, risking detection from above.

AUKUS deal: Australia's decades-long balancing act between the US and China is over

  AUKUS deal: Australia's decades-long balancing act between the US and China is over For more than 20 years, Australia tried to maintain good relations with both the United States and China. Now with the AUKUS deal, Canberra has picked a side -- Washington.For more than 20 years, Australia tried to maintain good relations with both the United States and China.

China : Expert discusses impact of AUKUS alliance. Sign up to receive our rundown of the day's top stories direct to your inbox. The plans sparked fury in China 's embassy in Washington, which accused the trio of a "Cold War mentality and ideological prejudice". The arrangement focuses on the military, marking it out as separate from the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing alliance. The Five Eyes, which formed in 1941, includes Canada and New Zealand alongside Australia, the US and Canada.

The Aukus deal has left the French political class seething at Joe Biden’s Trumpian unilateralism, Australian two-facedness and the usual British perfidy. “Nothing was done by sneaking behind anyone’s back,” assured the British defence minister, Ben Wallace, in an attempt to soothe the row. Moreover, the move was presented not only as a switch from the diesel-powered subs France was building to longer-range nuclear vessels, but as part of a new three-way security pact for the region that would develop new technologies. Perhaps someone had decided the French could not be trusted to join this

2) France has been left out in the cold

On that Shortfin Barracuda point, there is one major loser here: France. As a result of this agreement, France's government-owned Naval Group has lost a contract to build Australia's next generation of submarines. Reflecting the attenuated loss of billions of dollars and thousands of French jobs, French foreign minister Jean-Yves le Drian described AUKUS as "a stab in the back."

To be fair, France bears some responsibility for the Australian decision. Paris had prevaricated on holding to cost estimates and manufacturing/sourcing agreements with the Australian government.

Still, France has a legitimate complaint. Australia could have purchased at least some of Naval Group's submarines. Centered on highly advanced pump-jet, air-independent propulsion systems, the Shortfin Barracudas would have been very quiet and cost-efficient. Paris also has a legitimate gripe against the Biden administration. While President Emmanuel Macron remains too keen on attracting Chinese investment at the expense of security and human rights concerns, he has authorized bold French submarine patrols alongside the U.S. Navy in the South China Sea. This agreement obviously fails to reward those efforts.

Advocates fear US weighing climate vs. human rights on China

  Advocates fear US weighing climate vs. human rights on China U.S. envoy John Kerry’s diplomatic quest to stave off the worst scenarios of global warming is meeting resistance from China, the world's biggest climate polluter, which is adamant that the United States ease confrontation over other matters if it wants Beijing to speed up its climate efforts. Rights advocates and Republican lawmakers say they see signs, including softer language and talk of heated internal debate among Biden administration officials, that China’s pressure is leading the United States to back off on criticism of China’s mass detentions, forced sterilization and other abuses of its predominantly Muslim Uyghur minority in the Xinjiang region.

China has criticised a historic security pact between the US, UK and Australia, describing it as "extremely irresponsible" and "narrow-minded". The deal will see the US and UK give Australia the technology to build nuclear-powered submarines for the first time. It is being widely viewed as an effort to counter China 's influence in the contested The new partnership, under the name Aukus , was announced in a joint virtual press conference between US President Joe Biden, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his Australian counterpart Scott Morrison on Wednesday evening and Thursday morning.

AUKUS isn’t explicitly about China but c’mon, of course it is. Three major Western allies are teaming up to ward off Beijing’s military and technological rise in the Indo-Pacific. It’s a bold move that’s been well received so far Down Under. The French deal had long been in trouble, with the Naval Group, the French shipbuilder tasked with constructing the 12 submarines, and the Australian government sparring over design changes and cost increases. A new class of nuclear-powered submarines would give Washington and its allies in the Pacific a powerful new tool to attempt to contain Chinese military

3) The deal has limits

This is not the beginning of a new NATO for the Indo-Pacific. As reflected by the recent failure of Britain's HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier to transit within 12 miles of a Chinese pirate island in the South China Sea, the U.S. remains alone where it matters most — in conducting operations that bar China from inventing sovereign waters just because it builds and militarizes islands in international waters.

Unless and until the Australian and British navies join U.S. freedom of navigation patrols within 12 miles of China's pirate islands, this deal will remain limited in its strategic impact.

4) New Zealand is no longer a serious member of the Five Eyes partnership

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says her nation was not invited to join this agreement.

That's not surprising. While New Zealand adopts a strict no-nuclear policy, it has isolated its Five Eyes security alliance partners (Australia, the U.K., the U.S., and Canada) and refused to join U.S.-led efforts to challenge Beijing's aggressive behavior. Ardern's government instead resorts to absurd mythology in order to justify its abandonment of allies and betrayal of supposedly sacred democratic values. On that point, New Zealand no longer deserves or can be trusted with Five Eyes membership.

French submarine dispute could torpedo EU-Australia trade talks

  French submarine dispute could torpedo EU-Australia trade talks France is threatening to block talks on a planned free trade agreement between Europe and Australia after the Australian government ditched a huge deal to buy French submarines. © Handout/LSIS Leo Baumgartner/Australian Defence Force/Getty Images Australia, the United States and the United Kingdom have agreed a defense partnership known as AUKUS to build nuclear-propelled submarines, leaving France out in the cold.

5) China has miscalculated

China had assumed that it could leverage its economic might to avoid more coordinated international action against it. Instead, Beijing's arrogance and bullying are slowly waking up the democratic world to the need to resist. Even the European Union, once docile in the face of Chinese aggression, is beginning to re-balance its relationship with Beijing. Facing growing internal challenges, Xi Jinping must also now consider whether he has miscalculated abroad.

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Tags: Opinion, Beltway Confidential, National Security, Foreign Policy, China, Australia, Britain, France, Nuclear Submarine, South China Sea, Xi Jinping, Communist Party, New Zealand

Original Author: Tom Rogan

Original Location: Five key takeaways from the China-focused 'AUKUS' deal

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This is interesting!