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World An Afghan student who rushed to Kabul airport to try to escape said 'I thought at one point that this is the end and I will die'

00:45  19 september  2021
00:45  19 september  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

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a group of people walking down the street: Thousands of Afghans rush to the Kabul International Airport as they try to flee the Afghan capital of Kabul, Afghanistan, on August 17, 2021. ( Sayed Khodaiberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images © Sayed Khodaiberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Thousands of Afghans rush to the Kabul International Airport as they try to flee the Afghan capital of Kabul, Afghanistan, on August 17, 2021. ( Sayed Khodaiberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
  • A 22-year-old Afghan student described the chaos at Kabul's Hamid Karzi International Airport to CNN.
  • She said crowds of people caused mayhem at the airport as they tried to flee Kabul amid the Taliban takeover.
  • She said she thought she was going to die at the airport.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

A 22-year-old Afghan student who was among throngs of Kabul residents who tried to flee through the city's airport on Monday amid the Taliban's takeover says she thought she was going to die during the rush.

As world marks 9/11, Taliban flag raised over seat of power

  As world marks 9/11, Taliban flag raised over seat of power KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban raised their iconic white flag over the Afghan presidential palace Saturday, a spokesman said, as the U.S. and the world marked the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. The banner, emblazoned with a Quranic verse, was hoisted by Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund, the prime minister of the Taliban interim government, in a low-key ceremony, said Ahmadullah Muttaqi, multimedia branch chief of the Taliban’s cultural commission. © Provided by Associated Press A man walks down the stairs at dusk in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021.

Aisha Ahmad told CNN that crowds of people, "including many without passports and little security" caused chaos at Hamid Karzi International Airport on Monday.

"The crowds were pushed by police. Kids and women were on the ground," she said, adding that it felt like a "doomsday" situation.


Video: Crowds rush to Kabul Airport as desperate Afghan citizens attempt to flee city (The Independent)

"I thought at one point that this is the end and I will die," she added.

Ahmad said she did not make it out of Kabul on a plane on Monday, and is unclear what she will do next, as she fears she will be unable to finish her university education.

"People are not much outside, and they do not know how their daily activity will be when life is back to normal. Will they force stores to close during prayer time? Will there be punishment for not going to the mosque, will they force people to go? ... No one knows," she told CNN.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Defense secretaries in their own words: US 'invented reasons' to stay in Afghanistan .
The Taliban blitz exposes the failure of the 20-year Afghanistan war and portends terrorism threats, say former defense secretaries Panetta and Hagel.Afghan security forces, trained and equipped at the cost of $83 billion, wilted before Taliban fighters. With few exceptions, the Taliban rolled through provincial capitals without a fight despite a force of Afghan troops that was supposed to number more than 300,000.  In reality, there were far fewer Afghan forces because of desertions and commanders who reportedly pocketed the pay of ghost soldiers they had kept on rolls. For those who remained and fought, there wasn't enough ammunition and food, to say nothing of pay.

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