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World 'Nobody should be surprised': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban

09:15  19 september  2021
09:15  19 september  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

News Analysis: What went wrong in Afghanistan?

  News Analysis: What went wrong in Afghanistan? With the Taliban in control in Afghanistan's capital and the Biden administration under fire for a chaotic withdrawal, a look at what went wrong.Achieving that goal also included overthrowing the Taliban, and steadily the mission morphed into a vast, complicated experiment to reshape a society that few Americans understood.

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As the Taliban started to gain territory in Afghanistan at an alarming rate last month, President Joe Biden was asked whether a Taliban takeover was inevitable. "Not, it is not," Biden told reporters at the White House on July 8, hailing the 300,000 Afghan National Security Forces as "well equipped as any army in the world" and comparing those numbers to the … Daniel Davis, a twice-deployed veteran of the war in Afghanistan . “ Nobody should be surprised by these outcomes if they had been paying attention.”

WASHINGTON – As the Taliban started to gain territory in Afghanistan at an alarming rate last month, President Joe Biden was asked whether a Taliban takeover was inevitable.

"Not, it is not," Biden told reporters at the White House on July 8, hailing the 300,000 Afghan National Security Forces as "well equipped as any army in the world" and comparing those numbers to the Taliban's estimated 75,000 fighters. "It is not inevitable."

The president's optimism about the abilities of an army trained and funded by the U.S. proved wildly miscalculated over the weekend as the Taliban routed Afghan security forces and seized control of the government amid the chaotic U.S. military exit.

Opinion: A kinder, gentler Taliban?

  Opinion: A kinder, gentler Taliban? The Taliban is promising peace and an amnesty, but it's instructive to look at what they did when they took control in Kabul in 1996, writes Peter Bergen. The Taliban imposed their ultra-purist vision of Islam on much of the country. Women had to wear the burqa and stay at home unless accompanied by a male relative. Music, television and even kite flying were banned. There was no independent Afghan media; only Radio Shariat that blared Taliban propaganda.In an unsettling echo of how the Nazis treated the Jews, the Taliban forced the country's miniscule Hindu population to wear distinctive clothing.

" Why were the Taliban able to so quickly take over? "American troops cannot and should not be fighting in a war and dying in a war that Afghan forces are not willing to Kirsten Fontenrose, director of the Scowcroft Middle East Security Initiative at the Atlantic Council, said the "The ' surprise ' at the Taliban regaining power shows just how little Americans, from top to bottom, understand Afghanistan ."

AUG 16 - were quick to humiliate the Joe administration, taking over the country just days after US forces Globalist ritual humiliation! — breaking… # Taliban Leadership Threatens: ‘Joe Biden surprised ': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the # Taliban | 1 hr ago

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More: Afghanistan in chaos as thousands try to flee Kabul after Taliban takeover

Images of Afghan citizens clinging to U.S. military planes departing the airport in Kabul drew comparisons to the U.S. abandonment of Saigon at the end of the Vietnam War and invited widespread criticism of Biden's decision to end America's 20-year military occupation of Afghanistan.

a group of people standing next to a man in a military uniform: Afghan security force personnel stand guard along the roadside in Herat on August 12, 2021, as Taliban took over the police headquarters in Herat, Afghanistan's third-largest city. © AFP via Getty Images Afghan security force personnel stand guard along the roadside in Herat on August 12, 2021, as Taliban took over the police headquarters in Herat, Afghanistan's third-largest city.

Most U.S. military senior leaders, including commanders on the ground, did not foresee the collapse of the Afghan National Security Forces, according to a U.S. official who was not authorized to speak publicly. But former military officers who served in Afghanistan said there were signs the Afghan military – unmotivated, disorganized and plagued by low morale – would struggle against the Taliban.

White House says a 'fair amount' of US military equipment provided to Afghans is now in Taliban hands

  White House says a 'fair amount' of US military equipment provided to Afghans is now in Taliban hands "Obviously, we don't have a sense that they are going to readily hand it over to us at the airport," National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan said.WASHINGTON — National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan said Tuesday a "fair amount" of military equipment the U.S. provided the Afghan National Security Forces was seized by the Taliban in the militant group's quick route of Afghanistan.

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The Afghan security forces have suffered well over 60,000 deaths since 2001. But Abdulhai was not talking about the Taliban , but rather his own government, which he believed was so inept that it had to be part of a broader plan to cede territory to the Taliban . Washington and the Taliban may spend years pulled between cooperation and conflict, Some of the key issues at hand include: how to cooperate against a mutual enemy, the Islamic State branch in the region, known as ISIS-K, and whether the U.S. should release .4 billion in Afghan government currency reserves that are frozen

"They were evident for a long time," said retired Lt. Col. Daniel Davis, a twice-deployed veteran of the war in Afghanistan. "Nobody should be surprised by these outcomes if they had been paying attention."

More: A timeline of the US withdrawal and Taliban recapture of Afghanistan

China accuses Washington of 'low political tricks' over Uyghur exhibit

  China accuses Washington of 'low political tricks' over Uyghur exhibit China accuses Washington of 'low political tricks' over Uyghur exhibitGENEVA (Reuters) - A U.S.-backed Uyghur photo exhibit of dozens of people who are missing or alleged to be held in camps in Xinjiang, China, opened in Switzerland on Thursday, prompting Beijing to issue a furious statement accusing Washington of "low political tricks".

Learn: ' Nobody should be surprised ': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban . The terrifying images come after Taliban fighters took over the country on Sunday, leading to a panic as thousands tried to flee. 1979 to now: A timeline of the US withdrawal and Taliban recapture of Afghanistan . Jonathan Finer, deputy White House national security adviser, told MSNBC on Monday that U.S. forces were working to secure the airport. "There should be sufficient forces to be able to provide security for the airport so again we can return those civilian evacuation flights for

WASHINGTON – The intelligence community did not predict Afghanistan would fall as quickly as it did, President Joe Biden told ABC News in an interview in which he also rejected reporting that some military leaders asked him to keep some troops there. "The intelligence community did not say, back in June or July, that in fact this was going to collapse like it did," Biden told George Stephanopoulos in an interview that aired on Good Morning America Thursday. ' Nobody should be surprised ': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban .

Unmotivated to fight for 'corrupt' government

The U.S. pumped more than $80 billion in equipment and training into the Afghan security forces since the start of the war in Afghanistan, which the U.S. launched to root out al-Qaida after the 9/11 attacks.

But Davis said Afghan security forces were unmotivated to fight for a government and military that "top to bottom was incredibly corrupt." As a result, he said, the Afghan army just "melted away," giving way to the Taliban without putting up a fight in most cities.

Members of Afghan security forces guard along the roadside in Panjshir province on August 14, 2021. © Ahmad Sahel Arman, AFP via Getty Images Members of Afghan security forces guard along the roadside in Panjshir province on August 14, 2021.

Davis described the response from Afghan soldiers on the ground as apathetic: "'I'm not going to die for a government that doesn't even take care of me, that doesn't pay me very well, and that doesn't even give me food, bullets, resupply things, doesn't give us backup when we need help.'"

'They already looking for me': An Afghan interpreter on the last 24 hours

  'They already looking for me': An Afghan interpreter on the last 24 hours On Monday, I feared the worst. I had messaged Omid Mahmoodi, who worked as an interpreter for the U.S. military. But nothing. And then I had messaged Omid Mahmoodi, who worked as an interpreter and cultural adviser for the U.S. military for three years during the war.

Rather than dig in, soldiers calculated they couldn't defeat the Taliban, experts say.

The withdrawal of U.S. military backing, particularly airstrikes, and the Taliban gaining support from Pakistan, China, Iran and Russia, left Afghan forces largely on their own.

“Afghans read the tea leaves,” said Seth Jones, senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former adviser to the commander of U.S. Special Operations in Afghanistan. “All the major countries – probably except India – in the region had come to terms with the Taliban government. The U.S. was not going to be there, nor the Europeans. Therefore, it made no sense to fight and die because the odds were stacked heavily against them.”

What we know: How did the Taliban retake Afghanistan so quickly?

For the past several years, elite Afghan commandos and other units had operated effectively on their own for the most part, Jones said. But backup from U.S. warplanes and the tangible commitment of American troops in Afghanistan gave them an edge.

“I don't see this as poor training, per se, of the Afghan national security apparatus, or poor equipment or inability to do logistics,” Jones said. “One of the key aspects that failed at the end was morale.”

'Intelligence failure of the highest order' — How Afghanistan fell to the Taliban so quickly

  'Intelligence failure of the highest order' — How Afghanistan fell to the Taliban so quickly "While the end result and bloodletting once we left was never in doubt, the speed of collapse is unreal," one Afghan War veteran told CNBC.After nearly two decades of war, more than 6,000 American lives lost, over 100,000 Afghans killed and more than $2 trillion spent by the U.S., the outlook for the country's future was still grim, with regional experts assuming the Taliban would ultimately come to control most of Afghanistan once again.

Gil Barndollar, a former Marine who also served twice in Afghanistan and a senior fellow at Defense Priorities, a group that supported the withdrawal, pointed to the Afghan army's annual turnover – one-third of the entire force in recent years. He said combat deaths, wounds, failure to reenlist and desertions all contributed. In 2017, The New York Times reported that Afghan army recruitment in some provinces dropped by 50%.

"That was not a sustainable situation," Barndollar said. "Afghan security force attrition fatally undermined any contention that we were in a stalemate, or if we could have sustained things if there was a third option of continuing to do what we had been doing."

Barndollar said the disastrous outcome was "baked in" after 20 years of a failed war. "Trying to execute a flawless end game after that, to me, is like cramming for a final the night before after failing a course all semester."

More: 'They already looking for me': An Afghan interpreter on the last 24 hours

U.S. concerns about the Afghan army go back years

Active military leaders questioned the preparedness of the Afghan security forces in recent years.

Nearly three years ago, Marine Gen. Kenneth "Frank" McKenzie, the top U.S. general for the Middle East, raised concerns publicly about the Afghan military's ability to defend itself. "If we left precipitously right now, I do not believe they would be able to successfully defend their country," McKenzie, then the incoming head of U.S. Central Command, told Congress in December 2018.

Photos show turmoil and panic as Taliban enter Afghanistan's capital Kabul

  Photos show turmoil and panic as Taliban enter Afghanistan's capital Kabul The United Nations has cited continued reports of serious human rights abuses and violations in the communities most affected by the fighting. International aid groups have warned of a humanitarian crisis.U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres expressed particular concern Sunday about the future of women and girls in the country, saying hard-won rights "must be protected" and "all abuses must stop.

In April, McKenzie told a Senate committee he was concerned “about the ability of the Afghan military to hold on after we leave.”

The Washington Post in 2019 publicized a trove of previously undisclosed interviews of military officers that described the Afghanistan forces as undisciplined and incompetent. Afghan police deserted their jobs with their government-issued weapons to set up their own private checkpoints to extort travelers, Thomas Johnson, a Navy official, said in one interview.

The Afghan soldiers were "stealing fools" who looted equipment supplied by the U.S., said Victor Glaviano, who worked with the Afghan army as a U.S. combat adviser from 2007 to 2008. Glaviano complained to interviewers that the Afghan troops had "beautiful rifles, but didn’t know how to use them" and were wasting ammunition.

a group of people posing for the camera: Afghan youths who would be inducted in Afghan Security forces sit along a road in Panjshir province of Afghanistan on August 15, 2021. © Ahmad Sahel Arman, AFP via Getty Images Afghan youths who would be inducted in Afghan Security forces sit along a road in Panjshir province of Afghanistan on August 15, 2021.

Meanwhile, the Taliban changed their approach from two decades ago.

In the years since the Taliban's 2001 defeat, they “got smart” and negotiated peaceful transfers of power in parts of Afghanistan, said Michael O’Hanlon, a national security expert at the Brookings Institution. That mitigated the downside of defeat for those who had backed the Afghan government and contributed to the sense of inevitability for the Taliban.

“It looks like a snowballing to me,” O’Hanlon said. “Afghans don’t like to be on the wrong side of a losing fight. When we pulled out so fast, with little development of a credible strategy or plan for how the Afghan security forces could secure at least part of the country on their own, many were discouraged.”

After two decades and billions spent, Afghan government collapses as Taliban takes Kabul

  After two decades and billions spent, Afghan government collapses as Taliban takes Kabul The Taliban, which for hours had been in the outskirts of Kabul, announced soon after they would move farther into a city gripped by panic.Embattled President Ashraf Ghani fled the country as the Taliban entered the capital city of Kabul, and American troops scrambled to evacuate thousands of U.S. diplomats and Afghans from the U.S. Embassy.

White House now says it knew the fall of Kabul was 'a possibility'

In July, Biden quickly rejected any comparisons of the Afghanistan exit to the U.S. withdrawal in Vietnam in 1975 before the North Vietnamese rolled into Saigon.

"None whatsoever," Biden said. "Zero. What you had is, you had entire brigades breaking through the gates of our embassy."

He continued that the Taliban is "not remotely comparable in terms of capability" to the North Vietnamese Army.

"There's going to be no circumstance where you see people being lifted off the roof of a embassy in the – of the United States from Afghanistan. It is not at all comparable."

But talking points distributed by the White House Monday said: "The administration knew that there was a distinct possibility that Kabul would fall to the Taliban. It was not an inevitability. It was a possibility."

More: What President Joe Biden said in his address on Afghanistan

In a speech from the White House defending the military withdrawal, Biden said the U.S. should not fight a war that "Afghan forces are not willing to fight for themselves." He said the Afghan army was larger than militaries of many NATO allies and noted that it had something the Taliban lacked: an air force.

"We gave them every chance to determine their own future. What we could not provide them was the will to fight for that future."

Reach Joey Garrison on Twitter @joeygarrison.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 'Nobody should be surprised': Why Afghan security forces crumbled so quickly to the Taliban

After two decades and billions spent, Afghan government collapses as Taliban takes Kabul .
The Taliban, which for hours had been in the outskirts of Kabul, announced soon after they would move farther into a city gripped by panic.Embattled President Ashraf Ghani fled the country as the Taliban entered the capital city of Kabul, and American troops scrambled to evacuate thousands of U.S. diplomats and Afghans from the U.S. Embassy.

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